Rimfire Central Firearm Forum banner

cleaning barrels

403 Views 7 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  Gizzy
i posted an opinion on the savage site suggesting that he might be able to improve accuracy by not cleaning his barrel every 20 shots and letting it heat up a bit. hope i wasnt wrong with advice.probably old hat here,but is there a theory about over cleaning,letting the barrel break in abit.cause i sure hope so. i only clean my barrels about every 200 rnds.but do live in dry climate. one actions i spray with remlube and swab after every session. is their different trains of thought on this. do some guns do better either way? hope this isnt old horse.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
5,129 Posts
I find that it takes around 20 rounds to get accuracy back where it should be after cleaning so to clean every 20 rounds wouldn't make much sense for me. I like to clean my barrel thoroughly after about 350-500 rounds.

I've heard of benchrest shooters cleaning their barrels after a limited number of rounds fired so there may be something to it:confused:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
I'm sure you will hear opinions that span the range. Some assert their rifles are more accurate with clean barrels, but I believe most feel that you need at least 15 rounds, maybe more, of a given ammo to see what that ammo will do in a given rifle. In general, I find I get satisfactory results cleaing barrels only when accuracy starts to deteriorate.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,646 Posts
Bench-rest shooters will clean and be obsessive about it as they need their barrels to be absolutely consistent, and constant cleaning keeps them in the same condition constantly.

General theory is that for the average shooter to not clean often, but using the same ammo will find a barrel levels off to its best consistent precision on an ammo in say 20 shots. Then it will stay accurate for that ammo fora long string, eventually precision will trail off and then it is time to clean and go again. Could be 100 or 1000 shots, depends on the rifle.

I took several months trying different ammo makes using a lot of shooting of each brand and stumbled on this. I did not clean after every ammo change nor even after every session. I would fire off two shots at an ammo change to "season" for that new ammo and stumbled on something else, for me anyway.

My test would use 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper with 5 aim points. I found this consistency, that some days the upper right aim point would always be my best for that day on every target, sometimes the lower left, sometimes the center bull. Could be my first shots, or my last for that ammo. The real consistency was it would change from session to session which told me my bench shooting skill was not consistent day to day, but changed at each set up and was so rigid at that point I would not be in good position for each aim point on that day but just for one bull. Seriously, I noted that on my second session of intense testing, and never did get that corrected.

Back to the original on cleaning. That is why I clean my barrels after approx 500 rounds, more or less. Unless high tide brings the Atlantic to the base of the Rockies - in which case I will use my rifle for an oar.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,447 Posts
0Different rifles seem to lead up at different rates in the leade area. Some I clean at 100, some at 300 rounds.

The biggest thing to be sure to clean is the ring just in front of the case mouth and the rifling in the leade area.

Lead can take on a shiney appearence that many think is the barrel when in fact there is a good layer of lead inbetween the lands. Too much lead will squeeze down the ball and strip lead from it so when it gets further down the barrel where there is less lead, the ball is on the small side, so I cannot see cleaning every 20 rounds, most of my rifles take at least 20 rounds to really shoot, but then I'm not using hand lapped custom barrels either. The smoothness and consistancy of the rifling makes a difference.
I let the rifle dictate when to clean it.

My Best, John
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,161 Posts
BD,
I seen your post on the Savage forum.
One thing I dont think anyone pointed out is that the 17HMR is more like a center fire than a rimfire(in referance to bullets and FPS).IE fully copper jacketed,not a waxed lead bullet.Also traveling much faster.
I have never had a centerfire that got more than 50 or so rounds through it and not have it tell me I should clean it.22 rf ,with waxed lead bullets will go much longer between cleanings than their centerfire brothers.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
18,181 Posts
BD,
I seen your post on the Savage forum.
One thing I dont think anyone pointed out is that the 17HMR is more like a center fire than a rimfire(in referance to bullets and FPS).IE fully copper jacketed,not a waxed lead bullet.Also traveling much faster.
I have never had a centerfire that got more than 50 or so rounds through it and not have it tell me I should clean it.22 rf ,with waxed lead bullets will go much longer between cleanings than their centerfire brothers.
Exactly..... The HMR should be cleaned like a centerfire, and that means every 20-30 rounds, and or every time you bring it back in from shooting. I leave my .22lr's dirty for years.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top