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Canyon creek custom stock cheap

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Looks like it was made, or modified, to accept both safety types.
The first thing it would need, is a trip back to LeRoy to doctor the scratch that was mentioned.
Only a few options, but still a lot of bucks to have created these days. At least $1500 just for the labor factor, plus the three options, plus the blank.
I was more comfortable with Canyon Creek prices years ago, about a third less, when I did ten with him. My interest in the sport was also keener, so that probably explains it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The stock is for sale from
I stay away from EBAY. There is no Santa Clause there. If it went cheap, there's probably a reason.
This stock is for sale from Lock Stock & Barrel. Reputable company with an impeccable reputation. If you have any questions about it, just ask. They’ll answer. Stock is still for sale and has not yet sold.
 

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That thumbhole stock has sleek good looks, at least I think so... but I much prefer my thumb straight up behind the bolt, as allowed with a conventional stock. If I had a rifle relegated to the status of a picture I would like one of those stocks on it.
 

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Thumbhole stocks were developed in the 1930s/40s for position shooting. The idea was to place the grip lower, close to the trigger, and at a steeper angle, so the shooter's wrist was straight, allowing a cleaner trigger release. Thumbholes came to dominate European position rifles, even in the Prone event. Even UIT Standard and Prone rifles tried to emulate the hand position with the thumbhole itself. Most allowed a thumb-up hold for those who preferred; think of the scallop behind the bolt on a 54 Supermatch.

The sporter thumbholes I've seen are more raked, and further behind the action than a Match thumbhole. The effect is rather sleek, but I can see why it wouldn't offer the same ergonimic advantage as the original.
 

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Where's the picture of the scratch? What's that huge black puttied in area, inside, above left of trigger cutout, it does not appear to be walnut wood grain to me? Is that "Electrical Tape"?
Electrical tape is for electrical wire as it uses a very goopy adhesive.
 

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Where's the picture of the scratch? What's that huge black puttied in area, inside, above left of trigger cutout, it does not appear to be walnut wood grain to me? Is that "Electrical Tape"?
Electrical tape is for electrical wire as it uses a very goopy adhesive.
The electrical tape, being used to hold the trigger guard in place.
 

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The electrical tape, being used to hold the trigger guard in place.
Yes, post 5. I had already read that, unlike some posters who bypass all of the threads previous posts after which they then add their post. :rolleyes:

Some post super close to yours and theirs are exactly the same content as yours! Happened to me in a recent thread. :(
 

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Apparently, a collector is selling off some of his nice stuff. You youngins might not think so, but sooner or later, most of us do it.
I see that the same dealer is offering an Anschutz American, one of 250 stocked by Cooper in the 90s, and one of two that I owned.. I am the original purchaser of that GB gun. Bought it from The Outdoorsman at a Valley Forge show. Sold it perhaps twenty years ago. I don't recall where my buyer was, but it's in CA now.
 
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