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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I bought a lightly used Micro Nickel Pro Target Buckmark about a week ago. I've fallen in love with the gun. I own 4 other guns, but this is quickly become my favorite. My problem seems to happen after cleaning and reassembley.

Right after I bought the gun, I brought it home and did (what everyone does); I cleaned it and reassembled it (to make sure that the prior owner's cooties were dead). After reassembley, it took Godzilla to cock it. For some reason, the slide came back very hard.

I took it to my local range (where I'm a member). I swear to you, when I entered the store, the gun acted perfectly. At some time between the reassembley and the ride to the range, the slide was normal again. I had no problem cocking it at all; it worked smooth, although, it would not stay back when cocked. The in-house smith took a look at it. Someone had done something to the magazine; it appeared to have been in a vice or something. I bought two new magazines and threw out the magazine that came with it.

Today, I went to the range. The gun worked flawlessly. I clean my guns everytime I go to the range (I take flawless care of my guns; a holdover from 6 years in the Air Force). Once again, it takes the strength of Godzilla to pull back the slide and cock it. After cocking, the slide is easy to pull back, until you pull the trigger, then it's very hard to pull back. I'm waiting to see if tomorrow it miraculously fixes itself like it did a week ago.

Does anyone have an idea as to what is going on? Any help would be appreciated.

Diane K.
 

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I am not quit sure what you are saying but all auto's are harder to cock after
the trigger has been pulled. After the trigger has been pulled and you go to
cock it you have to push the hammer and it's spring back again until it cocks
which requires a lot more effort. Once the hammer is in the cocked position
the slide works easy because there is almost no resistance until you pull the
trigger again. All my auto's are a lot harder to cock after I pull the trigger.
Maybe this is not what you are saying but that's the way I read your post.
Once the hammer is cocked the only resistance you have is the recoil spring.
With the hammer in the uncocked postion you have the recoil and hammer
spring to over come.
 

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Yep, and also if you have one of the older Buckmarks that don't have the "ears" on the back of the slide it makes if more difficult to get a good hold on the slide. Don't dry fire it and it will always be easy. :)
Ross
 

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Just one note about dry firing the gun. If you want to keep your gun in the
uncocked position make sure you put a empty case or a snap cap in the
chamber and then you can pull the trigger to uncock the gun. If you don't
do this with a rimfire gun on some of them you can damage the firing pin and
the barrel chamber. Rimfires hit on the edge of the bullet case not in the
middle like center fire guns. When they hit on the edge without something
to cushion the blow damage can occur. this does not happen on all models
but better safe than sorry. While you were in the service if you had a side
arm I am sure it was a center fire gun. This is not a problem with them.
BTW thank you for your service for our country.
 

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I would strip the gun and look for binding and/or debris around the recoil spring. The clearance between the spring and guide rod is pretty tight and crud in this area can really tighten things up. Also, make sure that the recoil spring guide (plastic thingy) at the front of the spring/rod assembly is installed right side up. If it's installed inverted it will not engage the slide properly and will bind against the sight base. The narrow portion of the guide must be uppermost. This is item no. 36 in the Buckmark owner's manual.

Glad to hear that the Buckmark is your favorite! I've got two with thousands of rounds through them and they're still doing great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi,

I'll make myself clearer. When I bought the gun it was very easy to cock (even without the ears to grab hold of the slide). After cleaning it, it became very difficult to cock. I took it to the range, in the time that it took me to drive from my house to the range, it was again easy to cock (perhaps the vibration from the car helped). I put 200 + rounds through it, brought it home, cleaned it, and again, it was very hard to cock (only after the cleaning).

Mark, what you've said makes sense. When I brough the gun home and did the initial take down, I found almost what I would call "filings" under the sight mounting base. These were numerous, small pieces of metal splinters. I haven't seen any since I cleaned it when I brought it home; obviously, this isn't the normal debri found after firing.

The recoil spring guide is seated properly (it was the first thing I looked at when I reassembled it the first time). I keep empty casings to dry fire the gun; I lower the hammer on an empty casing prior to storage.

I took it back to the range today, it was a little easier to cock today, but still much harder than when I bought the gun.

Diane K.
 

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Diane. I would take a good look at the recoil spring and guide rod. Other than
a bind in the slide these I think might be the cause of your problem. If the
guide rod is bent or the spring is broke of bunching up for some reason may
be why it is ok sometimes and not others. Look to see if you have rub spots
on the spring. someone also may of change it to a non standard spring. These
parts are cheap I would replace them. Also check your buffer and make sure
the guide rod is going all the way thru into the recess in the frame. Make sure
also that there is a clip on the end of the rod that keeps the spring in place.
I think that Mark maybe right about a problem with the spring and guide
rod. If this is an older gun some of them had a washer under the sight base
instead of in the screw hole. If this is missing that could be a problem. There
is one more thing to try. Put the gun back together without the guide rod
and recoil spring. Work the slide back and forth to see if there is any
binding in the slide to frame fit or a possibe problem with the sight base.
 

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Hi, again, Diane. The suggestion to reassemble your Buckmark with the spring and guide removed is a good one, as this would reveal any binding problems unrelated to the spring/rod assembly. While you have the gun apart, note any witness marks on the rear frame post sides and on the area immediately above the slide-lock and safety levers. All Buckmarks will show some light wear in the anodizing in this area from normal use. Since your problem seems more intermittent in nature I suspect that it lies elswhere, but this is worth checking. I just cycled the slide on one of my Buckmarks, both cocked and uncocked, and there is an initial resistance while the hammer is being cocked, but it lightens up over the rest of the slide's travel.
 

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Greetings,

I have over-tightened the screws on top resulting in the condition you describe. Try replacing the star washers; they may have constituted the debris you found. Fresh washers will allow the screws to hold without overtightening. Good shooting. :Blasting_
 

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Ledbetter said:
Greetings,

I have over-tightened the screws on top resulting in the condition you describe. Try replacing the star washers; they may have constituted the debris you found. Fresh washers will allow the screws to hold without overtightening. Good shooting. :Blasting_
:yeahthat: :yeahthat:
Exactly!
In my gun-shop days I showed that "trick" to a few BuckMark owners experiencing the same problem you're having. A little overtightening is alll it takes on some Buckmarks. Replace the star washers or even file a few thousandths off the screws if necessary, and you'll be good to go. :t
The replacement of the star washers is the best fix, however.

One more thing; once you have everything up and running well again, it's a good idea to use the same screw in the same position after every takedown. That will eliminate any pronlems involving differing specs across the top rail.

FWIW! ;) - Dakotan
 

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Dakotan said:
...One more thing; once you have everything up and running well again, it's a good idea to use the same screw in the same position after every takedown. That will eliminate any pronlems involving differing specs across the top rail.
Ah yes! That reminds me... I believe the for and aft screws are of different length (at least on my production Buckmark: vintage 2000)
Be certain they are in the proper location. I'll check and post back if it's still needed.
-S
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hi everyone,

I took the gun back to the store; while there, the store owner and the person who works on his guns took the gun down and cleaned it. Low and behold, they could not cock the gun. The rod and spring are fine.

There is something making the hammer awfully hard to cock. Those metal filings may have found their way deep under it. Also, the store owner noticed that the hammer didn't seem centered and is rubbing. At any rate it's on its way to a gunsmith. In the end we may need to send it to Browning to fix the problem if the smith can't fix it. I'll let you know what happens.

Thanks for your advise.

Diane K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi,

My Buckmark is already at Browning getting fixed. What ever the problem is, they're going to stand good for it. That's fine with me; I like this particular used Buckmark. It suits me.

But, thanks for the idea.

Diane K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Update To Browning Buckmark Problems

Hi,

It's been awhile and I wanted to update you on my weird saga. I sent the bugger back to Browning and bought a brand new one. I noted that the new Buckmark had about 1mm of clearance between the hammer and the side of the gun frame; the old one did not. It was rubbing the frame. Browning eventually sent it back with a new slide. They also replaced the hammer. I have since sold the used Buckmark. The problem was definately not my imagination. It was the strangest thing I've ever encountered with a gun.

I love my new Buckmark. I think I'll be buried with it. My husband and I have compared his Ruger Mark II to my buckmark. Both are dead-on accurate. I like the balance of the buckmark much more (as well as the easy take down). You definately can't beat it. It was also nice that Browning fixed, without charge, a used Buckmark.

Diane K. :)
 
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