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Hmmm. I guess I see things differently. I see the Brno rimfires as simple designs where complexity and cost were added only when it would provide clear benefit, like threading the barrel. A case in point is the Brno rimfire triggers: from the Mauser style trigger to the 2-stage to the current 452 design. They are extremely simple, low part count designs. And how about those amazingly complex safety mechanisms! Not! And then there's that complex mechanism for removing the bolt. :rolleyes:

Hammer forged barrels? Once you have the capital equipment in place (which I believe the Germans were kind enough to provide during the war... somebody please correct me on that assumption if I'm out in the weeds), it's a high volume, low cost way to manufacture rifled barrels. It's a process that's suitable for high volume production of military rifles, but still results in excellent barrels. Sorry, I just don't buy your premise about high cost, high complexity Brno's. Great workmanship? YES, High cost? Not so much.
 

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That's an interesting theory, Mauser22, and you may well be right. OTOH, All4Fun has some interesting ideas as well and the truth may fall somewhere between the ideas of the two of you.

Wouldn't it be nice if someone researched the history of the BRNO arms company in depth and answered some of the questions we have no authoritative answers for now? I'd surely buy a copy.
I think that's probably true: the truth probably falls in between. :) Mauser22 has made good points. The Brno receiver really does have a fair number of machining operations. But I also believe that many of the mechanisms in Brno's were kept simple and elegant. And that kept part count low and assembly time low. I also think that Brno received some of its heavy machinery for "free" as part of the war effort, or as surplus. That means Brno Arms had little debt to service. And of course the cost of skilled machining labor had to be very low compared to the US.

Added up, I think these factors help explain Brno's competitive pricing.

I also think it's a good point that the Communist block had need of hard currency to buy items on the open market. So maybe they would be willing to trade-off profit to get hard currency.

I also hope one of the Brno historians czechs in and shares what they know... :t
 

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Interesting thread...and I agree that they are elegant and amazing rifles...my favorite RF's.

Slight deviation, the Czechs were making Mauser's and were known for their high quality arms etc. long before WWII and Hitler's minions came rolling through. (And later USSR.) Actually Czech arms were some of the reasons for the interest and timing of Hitler's invasion. (Sudetenland was just an excuse.) They have always been known for their innovation, quality and designs in arms...(Even their tanks were better than Germany's pre invasion.) Sadly the rest of the world sold them out and hung them out to dry for the price of peace...or peace at any cost attitude...thx Chamberlain. Anyway...
Thanks TOU... I appreciate the historical insight. I looked up Chamberlain and his appeasement policy on Wikipedia and it had this little blurb: "... the annexation of Czechoslovakia gave the Third Reich access to well-developed Czech industrial resources and significantly improved the Reich's strategic standing."
 
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