Rimfire Central Firearm Forum banner

Bench set-up

766 9
Hello: How do you folks shoot your CZ off of the bench? I assume most use an adjustable front rest and some kind of bags in the rear. What set-up has worked for you. I realize practice is important and I enjoy my time shooting, but I want to make sure I am not practicing bad techniques. I shoot alone, so I can not check out anyone elses set-up and I have not found any good books or videos on shooting rimfire benchrest. I am enjoying the shooting, but I sure would like to break 240 next month. My front rest currently has a flat bag on it and I am considering putting one of the protektor #1 bags there. Any helpful bench shooting information will be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Mike

Ps I did the Brookie spring set-up on my CZ and the improvement was very noticeable.

Pss My scope is a Simmons 1022T (3x-9x). I am thinking of a Weaver T36.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,889 Posts
Mike,

If you can afford it go with a front rest, with a windage adjustment. That alone has really helped me in my consistency. I have a bald eagle front rest with a windage top. I started out with a #1 front bag. Worked fine except with the narrow stock fore end the gun was always rotating slightly. I just switched over to a #3 front bag which has a 3" spacing between the ears. I use a Hart accuracy assist plate that attaches to the stock through the old front sling stud hole. That way I can use the same front bag for a wider target stock or the narrow sporter stock on the cz. The hart plate is 3" wide so sits flat on the front bag. Now I can pull the trigger and slide the gun back forward and it is never canted and pretty much will go right back to being on target. For shooting groups this is outstanding.

If you like to shoot usbr targets the adjustable windage top is so nice. That way you just turn the adjustment over to the next target ring. No need to bump the rear bag around. You can get on target very fast and have more time to concentrate on your shot and the wind flags.

For the rear bag I went with the protector leather bunny ear bag with a donut bag under it. The donut bag is a pain to fill, but takes all the rock and rolling of the rear bag out. If you fill the rear bag full it will round out the bottom of the bag. Which won't make any difference with a donut bag as it will contact the bag only on the perimeter and raise the rear bag up around 3/4".

Just made some home made wind flags and they really helped my score the first time out. It was pretty gusty winds and I still beat my average on every target. I think I am a firm believer in wind flags now.

With a good solid front rest and rear bag you will be much more consistent and steady. Then you can experiment around with different grip pressure techniques.


Oh well, just a start. These are some of the main things I have learned so far. I got most of my starting information from a local competive shooter who owns a custom gun shop and has been very good with giving out advice and suggestions.

Have fun shooting.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,889 Posts
Brookie

I built mine from scratch. I haven't taken any pictures of them yet will try to do it tonite. They seem to work very well, very sensitive. Unless I just got lucky, I did extremely well the first time out with them. The wind was very gusty and was constantly changing. At least with the flags you can find out what it doing to your bullet in that type of condition. I will try and post some pictures of them tonite.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,889 Posts
wind flag parts

Here is a picture of the parts disassembled.

The base is made out of 1" square tube, plywood, short 2x4, piece of electrical conduit 6" long.

For the vertical I wanted it adjustable for height so I went with a 2' piece of 1/2" od tubing with some duct tape wraps to get a nice fit inside the electrical conduit. The orange fiberglass wand is a driveway marker I bought at lowe's hardware, also 2' long. I put two rubber washers on it that fit tightly and act as a friction stop slide.

On the top of the vertical fiberglass wand I drilled and tapped a 6-32 piece of all thread around 1 1/2" long, with 3/4" of it sticking out. I then put on a 6-32 nylon nut with a nylon flat washer. I capped the whole thing with a 6-32 nylon cap nut.

For the horizontal I used another piece of the fiberglass wand 11 1/2" overall in length with a 2 1/2" slot for the foam board flag. The flag is made out of foam board that I got at a arts and craft store, 12" long, 7" tapering down to 2 1/2". I hot glued the foam board to the fiberglass shaft with the slot. I then drilled a hole in the fiberglass wand for a nylon sleeve with a built in washer on one end, 1" from the 2 1/2" end of the foam. That way I have nylon pivoting on nylon which works very smooth with little resistance.

I used a 1 1/4" wooden dowel for my counterweight. I drilled a hole lengthwise through the dowel for the fiberglass wand. I then bought a eye screw and blunted the end and am using that as a set screw.

I used a 28" piece of flagging tape with a paper clip attaching it to the foam board.

I made a small box lined with cutout foam to carry it all together as a unit except for the bases which I just put in the back of the truck. They are very quick to put together and are adjustable in height from 2' to about 3'-6". I lay the assembled flag on it's side off the end of a shooting table and balance it with the dowel counterweight. That way it pivots with just a small breath on it.

Most of the above dimensions I stole from various wind flag manufactures. The proportions seem to work out great as they are very sensitive. I set one out about 10' from the bench, one around 25 yards and the third one a little before or after the target depending on which way the wind is blowing.

Hope I didn't go into to much detail and drag this post out for you.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top