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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
the factory stock has a ledge at the rear of the inletted area that the rear of the trigger guard locks under...similar to how the m1 carbine reciever locks the rear of the reciever...... i assume this is what holds the rear of the reciever down, and allows the 10/22 to only need one action screw......

is this contact/support area something that is critical for accuracy??? is it normal to bed the area for better contact???.... is anyone installing a tension screw to adjust it?

from my experience w/ firearms in general, this is a critical area, but i don't know alot of the specifics about 10/22.... i would expect the rifle to shoot best w/ equal pressure on both the trigger guard and the action screw.....

any tips would be appreciated
cletus
 

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In the past I have completely free floated barrels by bedding the area behind the trigger guard well.
Chief Dave has also in the past said that this area is critical in bedding if you want to keep the reciever from rocking.
To eliminate the problem of getting the action in and out after bedding, put clay on the trigger guard before bedding to ensure that the entire are is not completely filled with bedding compound.

Some people have different ways of going about the one action screw problem. The most commons is as MKarr stated, bedd ahead of the action screw. This is easier than bedding behind the trigger guard, but I dont like it because I often take my barrel out and am afraid that the barrel wont seat exactly the same in the action when I put it back in, thus causing uneven pressure between the bedding and barrel.

There's a lot of ways to do it. The best thing is try them out. If the gun shoots well and the barreled action does not move in the stock then stick with that method. If it doesnt shoot well or you want to try something different then do it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
"The area you are describing does sort of hold the reciever down but it really doesn't do a very good job because if it were really tight enough to do some good, you wouldn't be able to get the action into the stock."

it appeared to me that as long as i rotated the reciever out, bbl first, and the engagement angle was the radius from the upper rear of the reciever to the end of the trigger guard....(i hope that makes sense)... i could get plenty of contact area............properly bedded, it should rotate into contact just before the reciever bottoms out, so a minor but consistent pressure is applied by the action screw...

like i said before, i don't know squat about 10/22's, 'cept what i've learned here....but, i've done enough gun "mechanic" work over the yrs to have a grasp of the general concepts of an accurate rifle...... if anyone has any good advice, i'm all ears!

cletus
 

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cletus, your thoughts are right on the money. this area can be bedded so that it has full contact with the upper rear part of the trigger guard, and yet it will still easily allow removal of the barreled action from the stock.
 

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my bedding method

Hi Guy's,
I prefer the two screw pillar method here is how I do it. I mill the cutout in the stock 20mm (3/4") longer than stock then make a second action screw block out of 7075 aluminium billet and capscrew it to the back of the action with two m5 capscrews

I then glue in front and rear pillars into the stock using 'pro-bed 2000' bedding compound. Stock here is ready for a bit of black touch up paint.

I mill a cut across the front of the action (4-6mm ball nose end mill) to create a inverse recoil lug out of bedding compound. This mainly so that the action sits back in the action the same way each time it is removed and replaced.

Finished bedding job done with 'pro-bed 2000'. I can take my action in and out of the stock with no measurable shift in bullet impact. I convert the front action screw to m5 using a 'keysert' and tap the rear block m5 and torque the front and rear scews to 20inch-lb's
With select baches of win subsonic in my duplex chamber my rifle shoots 7-8mm for 5 shots at 50m out of it's 16.5" Shilen select match suppressed barrel.

Cheers,
Craig.
NB:You can see there is a lot of work there. But too me the rifle has to be utterly reliable and hold it's zero. which it does. I can confidently plonk it down on its harris bipod aim 5 mils high (750mm, 2 1/2 feet) from a 70 m zero and know 9 times out of ten or better I will have a dead rabbit with a bullet through his shoulder at 150m. Head shots out to 110-120m are easy. I love mil-dot reticles.
 

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I have also hear of people threading a swivel stud into the rear of the reacever, adding a pillar and using 2 screws that way. Then you can bed the remainder of the action if you want to.
This method seems easiest and should be plenty accurate enough for even the most serious shooter. Therse is a wright up about this somewhere in here, do a search and maybe you can find it. 2 pillars and glass bedding., using proper torc each time.............it cant move.

JMHO
swampf0x
 
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