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Has anybody Finished a project with the arrow wood finish?
Have seen alot of good talk about and some saying they where going to try it.
But not much about the end results.
If you have a stock finished, a pic either posted or emailed would be great.
Looking for a new finish besides tung and polly have both now.
Like the tung but tends to darking to much, Love the polly but to much work.

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I'm looking at getting some, but haven't had the time to get it and work on my stock, yet. I'm going to try it anyways, sounds good, but then I'm going to have to get some moly fusion for the barrel, and then a Kid trigger, and ............:D
 

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I've got some

I am using it to finish a Turner Customs stock that I colored blue with rit dye. I only have one coat on it so far. I received the package yesterday and started last night. I am going for a high gloss finish and have to put several very thin layers on 24 hours apart.

Since I'm some ways from done yet, I can only tell you that I like what the first coat looks like. I have been taking pictures as I go along but am not ready to post anything yet. Hopefull, I will have something up by the end of the week.
 

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Three coats on so far. The first coat was put on with a cloth patch wet with arrow finish. The second and third coats (24 hours apart) were put on with just a drop on my finger, spread on a section of the stock and hand rubbed in until it felt dry. Repeated over whole stock. The finish is now feeling very smooth but is not very shiney yet. More like a semi gloss or satin finish. Looks good and feels good. Hopefully it will get a better gloss over the next few coats.

Found a couple of rough spots that had dings or something in the stock. Didn't show up until I started finishing it. Not very noticible. (I hope) Sometime in the future I might go back and resand and refinish whole thing. Too far along and too impatient to start over now. "**** the torpedos, etc. etc."
Next time I do this I'm buying a Palm sander! Gotta be better than trying to do this all by hand!

Arrowfinish is easy to work with, not caustic and not a very strong smell. I"ve been doing it inside the house and no one's complained of the smell. I havn't finished a stock before so I don't really have anything to compare it to?
 

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O.K. BigMac:

On the palmsander: you can use one with Arrow Wood for quick drying. Arrow plus mechanical help is required for large objects that can't be done by hand.

On newly discovered dings: As long as you don't mind going back to a dull finish in the areaa around the dings, just switch back to courser wet r dry sandpaper to get more finish-filling wood finish to make the dings dissapear (if minor, dissapearing is best, I think).

On getting to a finer than 600 grit: apply far less than the sparing use thus far and RAPIDLY buff it by hand, or with a finer grit, like 1000. Many thin layers is the way to build up ruggedness.

The reason for thinly, is to make sure all solvent is able to completely escape the finish, since there are no drying agents. (But prevents having to ga back with steel wool and remove the finish again).

So: If you have time (a rubber block, rubber shaped pieces will make rubbing 10 times quicker) don't put up with anything less than 100% perfection in finish feel, look, texture, and final gloss.

If you want the Weatherby super brilliant gloss and a baby-bottlom smooth feel, don't settle for anything less. Arrow Wood is too inexpensive to accept anything less. This is why it comes with a full page of directions and a full page of FAQ.
Final color should be the same color the wood would have if it were wet with isopropyl alcohol before finishing. This is something else you want to achieve. (No imbedded wet r dry sanpaper grit, etc.) The fact it is dry to the touch, it doesn't pick up dust from the air during the solvent "leaving" stage.

Jon.
 

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I haven't and wouldn't use a polishing compound on it.

Better to let it wear naturally or apply more very thin layers by hand.

Doing the finish method, and if you need a quick fix, I would use the back of a piece of sandpaper.

You don't want to risk imbedding something into an otherwise perfect finish.

It is not like urethane, where it is more like a piece of plastic you can use a polishing compound on.

If you have the polish already, better to use it on metal or glass.
Compound or abrasive will try to become part of anything it touches, even metal, plastic, and glass - never mind wood finish.

Polishing compound: even dry polishing compound would be throwing the baby to the wolves.
 

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Question Techshooter?

Give me a fast rundown on using your product on a bare walnut stock that has been sanded last with 400gr paper. Do I still use 400grit wet dry with your product or should I use 600 grit? How many wet sandings to fill the grain, on average?
 

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Question: "Give me a fast rundown on using your product on a bare walnut stock that has been sanded last with 400gr paper. Do I still use 400grit wet dry with your product or should I use 600 grit? How many wet sandings to fill the grain, on average?"

I start by cutting squares of cloth. Then shake the bottle until everything is mixed thoroughly. Then on each square (one at a time as necessary) and apply a few drops worth to the center, and rub vigorously into the wood. If need be I repeat this with other squares until every section is completed.
You give some time for each section for the "whiskers of the wood" to rise before rubbing with 320 or 400 grit wet r dry sanpaper, with a tiny drop on the paper to keep from removing what you put on: only drying what is there, and taking the whiskers of the wood, and they act as part of the pore filler.

The process of subsequent applications are much quicker, as there is now no more "whisker raising" as there is with the urethane finishes. Note the step of using alcohol and removing whiskers of the wood is eliminated with Arrow: The whiskers are actually used judiciously as part of the finish.

For further instructions and FAQ - HTML version, check out links at the Arrow Wood Finish page Arrow Wood Finish or check out directly FAQ and Instructions They don't give a date, but they are current through 12/2002.

I don't know if you have read the above, so I am answering your questions and not just giving the rush. I bet you never expected to find instructions, tips, and FAQ - even a bit dated at the website?

If you start with 600, the pores will clog up too quickly to work. You start with 600 on an existing finish you want to improve, but not fill dents and scratches: or as the directions indicate: "in reverse". 600 will be for a vastly thinner finnish.

A course grit reason is for just one coating on the raw wood, everything else should not dissolve through the first application, or you are just redoing the first application.

Does this help?
 

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Techshooter

I hope you don't take this the wrong way, but here goes. Your instuctions first say to "use sparingly," then it says to use it liberally. Then it says, "See tip 1 below," there is no tip 1. Then take a piece of wet-dry abrasive paper, ok but what grit? Sanding with the grain or not? When the finish becomes stiff and you say to use a cloth or your hand, is this roundy-round or with the grain or against the grain?

I think you should rewrite your instuctions in a kind of step by step fashion, at least for a beginner like me. I did one stock with Formbys and it turned out pretty good if I do say so myself. It took an awful lot of coats and a lot of time for the drying.

I'm refinishing a stock off a 40X from 1975. Tell me how I use your product and 320 grit paper without altering the shape(edges) of this stock?
 

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Well, I guess you need to read between the lines, I guess. Since you have wood finish "gumming up the sandpaper," it is actually much finer acting then if it were dry. You want to be very sparing in quantity, but liberal is getting that sparing amount onto the wood.

I guess it is kind of wierd-sounding, as you say. No offense taken.

You don't have to start at 320, but if you have sanded dry at 400, then 400 after the finish has soaked into the wood already, even the 320, the only wood it hopefully will sheer will be the risen whiskers. On edges, you can use greater care.

In checkering and engraving you don't even go near the sandpaper, but use a soft, medium, or hard-bristle toothbrush, depending on how much filling action you want. (The reverse of the edges you speak of).

So the main thing is to understand the science of the Wood Finish, and you go from there. It is recommended that as with all new technology you try it out on a test piece first.
 

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Tell you what I did so far..........

and you tell me if I'm doing it wrong.

First I rubbed by hand your Arrow Finish into the stock and let it dry for 24 hrs. I used enough and rubbed like heck with my palm. Then I wet sanded three times now with 400 grit wet-dry paper with the grain till it becomes real tacky and then I use a piece of old t-shirt and gently rub cross grain, allowing 24 hrs drying time between. Right-wrong?????
 

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Yes, you are doing it wrong.

It should be dry to the touch before the 24 hours. It should be done and dried to the touch in seconds. No time for dust and dirt to collect.

It is ready for the next application in 12 to 24 hours, not to finish each application.

If you are doing an entire piece, for example, you are done in minutes, not in 24 hours.

However, what is done is O.K. now, it was just longer than necessary, and risking dust getting imbedded into the still-wet surface.

This is my main criticism of letting it go that long: aggressiveness of the solvent (not an issue in this case), and accidental contamination risk (presuming not being done in a certified "clean room").

Otherwise, you have the idea, I think!

Does that make sense? I'm not trying to be critical.
 

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I'm getting confused..

I got your Arrow Finish on Saturday like you promised. I did one coat just rubbing it in with the palm of my hand, it's dry to the touch. Then Sunday afternoon I did the first sanding with your product, it's dry then too. I set it aside. After work on Monday I did the wet sanding and cross grain rubbing with the t-shirt rags again, it's dry to the touch too. I set it aside again. Today I did it for the third time.

Must be part of my Polish side, I'm doing it wrong, right???
 

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Hey, I'm glad you got it Saturday.
Well, and I mean this in a good way - you could have benefited from the gunshow demonstration, I guess - or describing how it went :)

It sounds like you are getting some good results, I hope, even if the technique is a little bit original.

You kind of want to combine a couple steps in one sitting for the quickest results.

Now for what you did, it sounds like it will work: it is just more steps than necessary. But I suspect the results should still be smooth to the touch, dry, wood filled, sealing the wood by now, I hope, and it should aready starting to look good. After letting the finish set, you want to combine a bit of finish with the sandpaper so any whiskers that are rubbed off become part of the finish for additional depth and strength: kind of like the fiberglass in Bondo.

Now once a base is done, then you MUST use far less with now the next finer grade: now 600 grit. You apply less onto cloth then the finish or hand to finish then immediately sand with the 600 with a tiniest dab on it. Don't wait like 24 hours for instance, or the solvent will soften the existing finish.

The important thing is to read the directions closely, and follow them, not the directions you would use for another finish, like Tru-oil. Tru-oil it is not.

You got to use it stingy like an irishman. The directions are long, but you gots to read them too, since they are written for exact following.

Confused is O.K., as long as you eventually understand.

I hope you are getting excellent results at this time - even if you're doing it different than I expected. - No inference intended.

Anyway, talking in a support way is good: the directions will get modified as necessary.
 

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Techshooter

I read your instuctions over again last night and was thinking about it at work today when something dawned on me. I had said I set it aside" to dry", I should have said "to cure." It's dry to the touch when I'm done each time, I just used the wrong termanology!

It is looking good!

One question I have, what if I drip Shooters Choice on it after it's finished?
 

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Not to be wise, but I say lightheartedly why don't you Moly-Fusion™-react a prepared barrel so hopefully you won't have to be so "wet" with the fine and outstanding "shooters choice" - and 2. Try not to wet a patch over the stock. Not saying shooters choice is bad, but if you don't need high volumes of it anymore, there should be less "drippage" and potential damage if any. If you aren't going to use Moly-Fusion, then just be careful.

Anyway, I am not sure you would really want to try that out on your now prized stock? finish that is now going to be a reflection of your work. Youi might hate to drip any powerful solvent on it to ruin it.

Do you plan on dripping various solvents on it for "eat through" tests? You know, to see which solvents and acids where will dissolve the largest holes through finish and wood. Just kidding. :D

Thanks for pointing out the terminology in the directions. This means you have an old version of the directions, because even the online directions, state "Allow the finish to cure 24 hours between coats." I do remember a version that had the wrong word "dry" instead of "cure" which is clearly incorrect, because it would lead you to believe it will turn from a liquid to a solid all on its own.
As to determining how "solid" the finish is when your done: as an experiment, a drop of water should immediately "bead" and not water into it. (If it does your in trouble at that spot). You want the following combination on the stock for the finish: easy to apply, beautiful, feel nice, rugged, and long-wearing - all 5. If you get most of the 5, then inexpensive would be the additional kicker.
 
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