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I bought an Anschutz 54 1710 D HB back in 2013 and put less than a box through it back then. Recently, I decided to put a rail on it and an Athlon scope that I bought from Doug. The other day, besides getting it out to the club-long over due(life got in the way)-, I wanted to see if it had a preference for Lapua CX or SK+. I picked the best 3 five shot groups from each load for a total of 6 targets all shot at 50 yards. CX for the win, this time. The targets are posted below. I look forward to getting this one out again-sooner rather than later- and this time with a much lighter trigger-good gosh it's too heavy now.


These 3 five shot groups are of the SK+ (vertical target)



These 3 five shot groups are of the Lapua CX ( 2 targets then 1 target)


 

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Those are nice results.

The 1710 can be a very good shooter. Sometimes even inexpensive SK Standard Plus can give very good results with that rifle. Below are two five-shot groups at 57 yards.




Unfortunately, SK+ cannot give consistently consistent results. There was a group shot between those targets shown above. Here's a more complete picture.



No doubt there was some shooter error involved with the middle group above, but consistent ammo is the key to consistent results.
 

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Great to see that you have the 1710 dusted off. I have an Athlon on mine and it also shoots well and with a wide range of ammo. SK performs well but as Penage Guy alluded to is inconsistent.
Sticking with Eley for its consistency and it's easier for me to source.
 

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Nice.

A couple of weeks ago I shot my best ever 100Y groups with any rifles. Average of the last six consecutive 5 shot group = 0.6507"

I can't do it all the time and at 50 yards I can typically only get in low 0.3s

But after shooting this 100Y groups, I'm convinced that if this rifle doesn't perform it's the ammo or me or both.

This is good, because now, instead of running after a new miracle sporter that will shoot consistently 1/4" at 50Y, I can focus on practicing and ammo selection.

 

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This is good, because now, instead of running after a new miracle sporter that will shoot consistently 1/4" at 50Y, I can focus on practicing and ammo selection.
Not many rimfire rifles out there in the world that are capable of consistent 1/4", and those that are, are usually custom BR rigs. Shooting 0.3's at 50 yards with a factory sporter is most excellent, likewise sub 3/4" at 100. Indicates you're doing your part just fine ;) Ammo is a big factor as well, the chase never ends.
 

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My 1710 D HB can shoot like that, but not too often with me pulling the trigger.

I am still experimenting with my grip and rests. Tight grip, light grip, no grip, where to put my thumb, check pressure, shoulder pressure...

What works for you and your 1710?

Thanks
 

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Not many rimfire rifles out there in the world that are capable of consistent 1/4", and those that are, are usually custom BR rigs. Shooting 0.3's at 50 yards with a factory sporter is most excellent, likewise sub 3/4" at 100. Indicates you're doing your part just fine ;) Ammo is a big factor as well, the chase never ends.
So that's it? I'm stuck in the 0.3s with a sporter? Thanks for raining on the parade :D
 

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Its sporter stock design can make the 1710 HB more challenging to shoot consistently well off a rest because of its relatively narrow forend. A BR-style rifle with a flat and wide forend is much less prone to movement or rolling on a rest. Despite being able to shoot very small groups on a target it can be difficult to shoot them consecutively.
 

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So that's it? I'm stuck in the 0.3s with a sporter? Thanks for raining on the parade :D
Depends what you wanna do to it... :p It is my observation that rimfires tend to bellcurve the groups they produce, you'll get some groups better than 0.3's, and some worse, with the typical group being in the 0.3's (or wherever your individual rifle centers on it's bellcurve). I've yet to see one that can pound out group after group with minimal variation in the group size.

Sporters present an extra challenge in eeking out cutting edge accuracy, and it is not as simplistic as being more challenging to shoot off a bench as some misguided posters might suggest. That's not to say rest setup and technique for sporters isn't important, it is, just that there is much more to it than that alone. Briefly, "free recoil" technique is ill suited to sporter stocks. A narrow front bag that snugly supports the stock and prevents it from rolling is ideal, combined with a firm hold. Front hand pulls the forestock straight down onto the front bag. Break the trigger clean and you're off to the races :bthumb:

The biggie with the sporters, though, is that relatively thin and taper profiled barrel. Finding ammo that plays nice with the barrel is more difficult than with their heavier, straight profile brethren. You can't load your ammo to suit the barrel as is possible with centerfire. A naked barrel sporter is probably the worst thing you could use to attempt high level benchrest accuracy with.

What can be done, then? A tuner is perhaps hands down the best accuracy enhancing mod for a sporter rifle. Yes, gone are the sleek, sexy lines of a sporter with one of those things hanging off the end of the barrel, but, such is the price of accuracy. I had briefly experimented with a tuner on my Weatherby XXII before the tuner was bored for my CZ custom. Observe what I got it to do, with SK Rifle Match to boot. Side note: I haven't had as good a lot of SK ammo since.



Yes, still a couple 0.3's, but most groups dived under that threshold. There ya go, it is possible to do better than 0.3's (on average) with a sporter! Now, observe the same rifle's behavior naked barrel. I can't touch the results generated with the tuner installed, and look at what happens with RWS Rifle Match S! :eek: Four different ammos tried, none of them really suit the naked barrel.



I hope this example really clarifies what one is up against when trying to get accuracy out of a sporter. You either get lucky with ammo or have to do exhaustive testing for the naked barrel if you aren't going to use a tuner. Even with the tuner, you still need a good lot of ammo, but it will still improve results compared to naked barrel. Finally, factory barrels. Is yours a good one? Always a big question mark and I have had an Anschütz barrel that was a royal dud (that Weatherby got re-barreled with a 1416 HB take-off). Custom barrels might be considered, though gains to be had are small if one is already getting 0.3's. Whole lotta money and effort to shave off hairs at that point!

Rifle and how I position it on the rest



I also shot this with my Lilja barreled Remington 597, no tuner. RWS Rifle Match S, what one barrel hates, another loves! Sporters are very picky, as this clearly illustrates. Been wondering what a tuner would do for my 597, just a thinner muzzle than the Harrell's bore comes stock, so not so easy to outfit this rifle (not to mention the barrel taper).

 

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With regard to the rifle in question, there is no "misguided" information offered above about the stock design contributing to the challenge of shooting the 1710 HB consistently well. The remarks about the thin and taper profiled barrel above are relevant to rifles with such barrels but they are not relevant here with regard to the topic at hand, the Anschutz 1710 HB.

The rifle in question here in this thread, the model to which the OP referred, is a heavy barrel rifle. Its barrel has a muzzle diameter of 21mm (.828 inches). The Anschutz 1710 DKL has the slimmer barrel at 18mm (.709 inches). The stock on the DKL model is somewhat different from the HB model.
 

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R4B1DM4U53,

Look at the accuracy that these guys are getting with a Sako sporter.

http://forums.accuratereloading.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/8711043/m/7531057281/p/1/xsl/print_topic

http://www.accuratereloading.com/2013/sakop04r.html

I'd be really happy to get something close to that.
thanks for the link to the sako results. I was very surprised to see how well that sako shot the federal american eagle at 100 yards. Considering how cheaply you can buy this ammo it is the sleeper in this test at 100 yards. Less than a inch at a 100 yards. I have used this ammo for years and has always shot very good for me.
 

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Depends what you wanna do to it... :p It is my observation that rimfires tend to bellcurve the groups they produce, you'll get some groups better than 0.3's, and some worse, with the typical group being in the 0.3's (or wherever your individual rifle centers on it's bellcurve). I've yet to see one that can pound out group after group with minimal variation in the group size.
I see what you mean. I shot this target yesterday. It was a little windy.
If I just keep the first 5 five shot groups, the rifle is shooting an average of 0.280"
But then for some reason it opens up and throws two successive groups of around 0.5" each that brings the overall average to 0.351"

 

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I see what you mean. I shot this target yesterday. It was a little windy.
If I just keep the first 5 five shot groups, the rifle is shooting an average of 0.280"
But then for some reason it opens up and throws two successive groups of around 0.5" each that brings the overall average to 0.351"
Very good, Kevin. Many rifles can have accuracy, but it is consistency in which they fall short. Far too many people will look at the tightest groups and assume that the rifle will be capable of that every single time "if they do their part", yet, you could put the rifle in a mechanically perfect machine rest and it'll still exhibit this behavior. C'est la rimfire. Each rifle will be different in how many shots it can go before it "acts up". Some do it every group (the infamous four in one hole plus a flier), others every other group or so, and better examples can go 5 or more groups. Some settle back down quickly, others take a group or two to shake the cobwebs off.

When you shoot enough rounds through many rifles, these patterns become apparent. One of mine very often shoots the best group of a set, then puts two in one hole, flips one high, drops the next low, and the last usually bites the edge of the first two, then the following group is usually very tight again. It's not the ammo, it's not "shooter error", it's quirky rimfire behavior. I've only seen one insight into why this occurs. When I get a chance I'll PM you with further information as I don't want to carry on with "irrelevant" discussion to the 1710HB lest I offend some cantankerous member(s) :rolleyes:
 
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