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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is a repeat of a post I made on another thread, it's worth repeating here for everyone's reference.
And yes, I've mentioned it before. If any of the administrators are watching, this might make a good sticky for the scope threads.

I've posted this before, and there has been a considerable discussion on it also, so it's worth repeating here.

There are some scopes that the objective lens (the lens opposite the eyepiece) is held in adjustment by a threaded ring on the outside of the scope bell. If you look at Nikons, Leupolds, Tascos, Simmons, and many others (Burris being an exception) you will see the approximately 1/4" ring on the bell of the scope.

If you were to go to Sears, as I did, and buy their small strap wrench, the one with the rubber strap, and use that strap wrench to loosen that ocular ring, you could remove it. Underneath you would find the lens carrier itself, which is threaded and this is how the factory adjusts parallax, by turning this ring in or out to the appropriate parallax adjustment.

To adjust the parallax, you must decide on a distance, once done, mount the scope on a solid rest. You could simply lay it on a bench, anything so that it doesn't move. It must be pointed at an object that is the same distance you would like the parallax set at, say 60 yards, for a .22. Look through the scope at the object and move your head around. You'll see that the object tends to move while the crosshairs remain steady, that is what parallax is. Turn the lens carrier in or out a turn, and check again. When you can look through the scope and the crosshairs remain on target no matter how you move your head around, you've got it set. Now all you have to do is tighten the adjustment ring you removed with the strap wrench and you're done.

No mailing the scope, no fees and no you're not going to let the nitrogen out of the scope as long as you don't take the lens carrier completely out of the scope, it's sealed with "O" rings.

I've used this method, which is exactly what the factory does, on all of the scopes listed above, even the Leupy VXIII and the adjustment rings are never really that tight, it's just you need the strap to get a decent hold on them. With this knowledge, you can play around with whatever parallax distance you think might work and change it at will.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Although I doubt the factory would appove, (as it's a money maker) but I seriously doubt they would not honor the warranty as long as the problem wasn't caused from the adjustment. Besides, how would they know that it was changed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did it to a Bushnell Trophy, and I just can't remember what a 3200 looks like on the objective bell. If it has a 1/4" ring on the end of the bell, it would more than likely work.

Grab a hold of it with your bare hands and try to loosen the ring if it's there and see, a lot of scopes aren't that tight at all.

I just flipped over and checked out some of the pics of 3200's on ebay and they look to have the ring on the end of the bell, so it should work. You might need a strap wrench to get it loose.
 

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I ve got my tasco varmit scope's piece off to expose those threads but can't seem to move the thread piece at all, there is 2 grooves on either side to fit a small screw drive in it looks like but this things not moving a bit, am i doing something wrong here
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If it's a varmint scope, doesn't it already have adjustable objective?

If not, it might have some heavy grease or even some very mild loctite. Just give it a sturdy turn. If it's really hard, then you can't do it as you have no way of breaking it loose. If that's the case, it's the first one I've ever seen that was that tight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What you're talking about is a whole different animal.

If you look closely, there is probably two or three tiny, TINY screw on the outer periphery of the AO ring. These little buggers hold the AO ring yardage reading ring to the proper position to indicate yardage. If you can find a very tiny screwdriver and loosen those screws just a tad, you can probably move it enough to correct the mis aligned readings.

On a scope with AO the ocular lens is in a movable carrier and you can't move it in relation to the adjustment ring. You can only move the yardage markings in relation to the carrier.

What I was posting about in this thread is adjusting parallax on NON AO scopes to use for rimfire rifles. Opening up a whole new world of scopes available for rimfire use, maybe even scope folks already have on hand. Also, it saves the cost and time of shipping a scope to the manufacturer for such a simple adjustment.
 

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If your scopes is pre-set @ 100yds, you will need to turn it counter-clockwise when looking at it from the front.Turn a little at a time and keep re-checking.

TIP:
If most of your shooting is done at 50yds or less, don't just stop as soon as its parallax free at 50yds. You can usually go a little farther and still be parallax free @ 50yds and further reduce parallax @ 25yds. I keep turning counter-clockwise until parallax just starts to become evident @ 50yds which reduces parallax even further at shorter ranges....

HD
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Why would you not do it to a high dollar scope? It does nothing to damage the scope. I've done it to several Leupy VXIII's that I use in the summer for .22 rifles and then set it back to 100 yards or so for use during deer season on my deer rifles. I get twice as much use out of the scopes.

Unless someone were to completely remove the ocular lens carrier, (the part you turn to adjust the parallax) no damage can come of it. Even if you remove it completely, you'd only lose n2 and then you'd have to send it in and tell them what you'd done and they'd charge a nominal amount to recharge it.
 

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bchannell,

Thanks for the info. I was indeed able to loosen the ring on the 3200 merely turning with my hand. This was very helpful and saved the +/- $25 Bushnell was going to charge.
 

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Macc said:
bchannell,

Thanks for the info. I was indeed able to loosen the ring on the 3200 merely turning with my hand. This was very helpful and saved the +/- $25 Bushnell was going to charge.
I tried to do the same to my Elite 3200 10x40 Mil Dot on my 597HB, but not only did the lock ring turn but the entire objective lens assembly did too. I was able to adjust the parallax down to where I want it, but I can't lock it. Any ideas on how to get the lock cap loose from the lens assembly or is this possible?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I would imagine that some lock rings have some sort of loctite (for lack of a better word) on them. Unfortunately, I don't know of a good way to 'unlock' one, as too much heat, or pressure might damage the scope permanently. As far as I know right now, Nikon, Simmons, Leupold, Tasco, and Bushnell are easily adjusted, the others I've yet to try.
 

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bchannell said:
I would imagine that some lock rings have some sort of loctite (for lack of a better word) on them. Unfortunately, I don't know of a good way to 'unlock' one, as too much heat, or pressure might damage the scope permanently. As far as I know right now, Nikon, Simmons, Leupold, Tasco, and Bushnell are easily adjusted, the others I've yet to try.
Any experience with the Tasco Custom Shop series? I would like to replace the reticle.

The 8-40x56mm focuses down to 10 yards precicely, even @ 40x. Yet, I wished I could put a 75-M61 Reticle in it.
 
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