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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This morning I decided to take my torque wrench to the range. Using Norma TAC22, I shot 5 shot groups beginning with a cold bore and all at 50 yds from a bench. First was 10 in lbs, then 15,18 20 and I stopped at 22 in lbs. Here are the results. I think my 2 best were at 15 and 22 in lbs. I probably should have shot a second group at 15 to verify it. I think the last group might be the best this rifle has ever done.
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Nice to see you doing some testing. This being said, you could shoot all those groups with the same torque value and get the same results... as there will naturally be some variation between the groups. To get statistically valid data, you'd need to do multiple groups at each torque setting, and compare the averages. Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nice to see you doing some testing. This being said, you could shoot all those groups with the same torque value and get the same results... as there will naturally be some variation between the groups. To get statistically valid data, you'd need to do multiple groups at each torque setting, and compare the averages. Good Luck
Thanks. Sunday I onnly had the one box of TAC22 with me. If the wind is calm this weekend I will take your advice and do that. Maybe 3 5 shot groups per torque setting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They all look good to me!
They do, but I did notice they got progressively tighter as the screw got tighter. I don't know what Ruger recommends. I also backed it out before retightening to the next torque value too so it was one smooth motion from no torque to the next value vs starting out at say 15 inlbs and having to overcome any stiction to move it. It was a fun experiment to try even if not very scientific.
 

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Ive done extensive action screw torque testing with a variety of mid range ammo...sk+, wolf match, eley auto precision, tac 22, eley target with my higher end component 10/22 build and the clear winner for my set up was 25 inch lb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ive done extensive action screw torque testing with a variety of mid range ammo...sk+, wolf match, eley auto precision, tac 22, eley target with my higher end component 10/22 build and the clear winner for my set up was 25 inch lb.
Did you notice whether all or just some brands grouped best at 25 in lbs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Are the barrels free floating when testing action screw torque?
My rifle has the entire action and the first 2.5" of the barrel bedded. With a stainless pillar and epoxy. So there is about 17.5" of my barrel free floating. I bedded under the barrel in front of the action to help support the weight as a full 920 dia stainless barrel adds quite alot of stress to the aluminum action and with a single action screw located where it is and lacking a rear screw as in most rifles tends to teeter totter in the stock if that makes any sense. I honestly don't think free floating a barrel that heavy in a 22 LR makes much difference as far as accuracy goes. Especially with the heavy 16 and 18" as there is negligable whip to those in a 22. I may be proven wrong there though. All I know is my rig is a shooter the way I set it up.
 

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It is always surprising how a seemingly small change can have a measurable effect on performance. Is there any general rule about action screw torque aside from just let the target tell you what the gun likes? For example is it better to have it as tight as it will shoot well or would you want it no tighter than it needs to be? To put it another way do you start at the tight end and progressively get looser or start loose and go tighter until you get the best results?
 

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Always use the torque at the lightest end that groups. The threads of the soft alum receiver are not robust.
this ^

I always use the lightest torque in the aluminum, and the heaviest recoil springs in the action, that get me where I want to go in the case of an accurate and reliably functioning 10/22

had a friend who would crank the takedown screw down as tight as he could on his savage bolt gun..till one day the wood said enough, and he cracked his stock... ruined his day of hunting
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It is always surprising how a seemingly small change can have a measurable effect on performance. Is there any general rule about action screw torque aside from just let the target tell you what the gun likes? For example is it better to have it as tight as it will shoot well or would you want it no tighter than it needs to be? To put it another way do you start at the tight end and progressively get looser or start loose and go tighter until you get the best results?
Considering the receiver is cast aluminum and screw is steel, I would set my limit at no more than 25 in lbs. But if you did strip the threads, that is an easy fix with a steel thread insert like a helicoil. Also, a bit of lithium grease on the threads helps get smooth, consistent torque settings.
 

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Most have no idea the percentage of thread engagement their receiver and screw actually has; the less % the more the torque setting needs to be reduced. And any 'lubricant on the otherwise clean and dry threads need to have the torque set less (see the past posts on torque wrench settings).
For me, in the 10/22, I approach even 18 in.# with caution when clean and dry and prefer 12ish much more.
Thats me, Ymmv
 

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I should also disclose that my receiver is a bronze/nickle alloy a much heavier metal than aluminum and torqueing to 25 inch lb does not worry me.
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The advise pertaining to aluminum receivers is sound and the least torque you can get by with the better.
 

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I should also disclose that my receiver is a bronze/nickle alloy a much heavier metal than aluminum and torqueing to 25 inch lb does not worry me.
View attachment 313005

The advise pertaining to aluminum receivers is sound and the least torque you can get by with the better.
Wow, that is Kool. How much $ did that set you back. Please take a picture of it fully assembled. I am sure you have extra goodies on it.
 
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