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I am about to do some work on my new 10/22 polish sear, etc. Instructions say to polish to 1500 grit. I doubt I can get that in my small town, so will need to order something.

I am a woodworker and have every sanding sharpening system for this known to man. But not so much for metal working. I am guessing wet/dry aluminum oxide sandpaper but want to double check. What abrasives should I have on hand to metal work for gunsmithing? Where should I order it?
 

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My way...but not necessarily the highway:

I generally use a white stone and then use a buffing wheel for a Dreamel with red polishing compound as final abrasive, clean with alcohol and lube



Maranatha-
pipestone
 

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I've used the inexpensive 4pk of various grit waxy 'butter sticks' available @ hardware stores with good results.
 

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Silicon carbide last longer on metal Photobug. The NAPA or Carquest stores in Jackson should stock 3M wet or dry sheets in their bodywork supplies.

Just go light. It's a lot easier to take metal off than it is to put it back on!

Frank
 

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Polishing sear surfaces...............

Sear surfaces are so small I've found stones the way to go, 3/8" square India stones in medium and fine remove tool marks and a white ceramic stone polishes enough for sear surfaces. Much easier and quicker than abraisive and felt bob with polish, easier to control and get true flat surfaces rather than run the chance of rounding over and/or getting out of square.
 

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Silicon carbide last longer on metal Photobug. The NAPA or Carquest stores in Jackson should stock 3M wet or dry sheets in their bodywork supplies.

Just go light. It's a lot easier to take metal off than it is to put it back on!

Frank
I have the Brownells kit with various carbide grits from coarse to fine mixed in grease that I've used for various projects.
Sear surfaces are so small I've found stones the way to go, 3/8" square India stones in medium and fine remove tool marks and a white ceramic stone polishes enough for sear surfaces. Much easier and quicker than abraisive and felt bob with polish, easier to control and get true flat surfaces rather than run the chance of rounding over and/or getting out of square.
Good advice here ^ as rounding the edges over is very easy to do IME. :eek::D
 

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I am another for the stones and have used the Brownell's set for years, supplemented by a couple of other small, flat, very fine polishing sticks. I use a dremel quite a bit in my gun tinkering but it stays away from trigger work.
 

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Imo&e power tools are used by beginners and advanced tool-heads. The results are predictable.
And most not advanced gun owners should not be working on sears and triggers.
The older, well used guns often have nice triggers, not so much because they had 'trigger jobs' but because they are well used.
I strongly suggest using the gun for 1000 shots before doing any 'trigger work'. Shoot that much and re-evaluate the 'need'. During that time read/study all you can about doing such work.
You might consider something like the VQ Target Hammer, sear spring and over travel screw.
Do I expect anyone to take this seriously? Not much.....
 
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