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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:rolleyes: In my last post 62A Snake Charmer there is a pic of this little rifle. Today while exterminating another "BIG" snake, my gun jamed after the 2nd shot. The shell was so tight in the chamber I couldn't retrieve it.

Didn't get a good shot on the snake the first shot, and he started down a hole, so I popped him in the side, and he came back out. When I tried jacking the 3rd round in, #2 wouldn't come out. I had to run up to the snake, hold him down with my foot as he was heading out under the barn wall. I snatched him up by the tail quickly, and slung him round and round so's he wouldn't bite me, then slapped him up side the wall to stun him so I could smash his head. Whew ! :eek:

Anyway; I can clean the gun real good, and it will shoot 3 to 5 rounds of birdshot and jam up. I polished the inside of the barrel today with JB Bore Polish. Don't know what else to do. :confused:

Could it be jamming because of powder fouling, or could it be the brass expanding in the chamber? Guess I could measure the diameter of the brass after its been shot. IT has me puzzled......

Sage
 

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Winchester and Federal shot loads are overlong cases with a nose crimp to hold the pellets in. When fired, the crimp opens up and becomes considerably longer than a standard .22 LR case.

I'd bet the longer front of the case is being blown into the rifling.

One cure would be to use CCI shot shells with the plastic shot capsule. Another would be to lengthen the lede until you can shoot Federal and Winchester shot loads without the empty sticking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
fflincher's QUOTE: I'd bet the longer front of the case is being blown into the rifling.

:rolleyes: That sounds reasonable.
I think I've tried the CCI's a long time ago, and that plastic tip doesn't like to feed into the chamber from the magazine very well. May have to give them another try.

QUOTE: lengthen the lede

I'm not familiar with that phrase. What does that mean?

Sage
 

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The lede is the space in the bore between the chamber and the rifling.

In some guns, the rifling begins at the end of the chamber, and bullets fully chambered will engrave the rifling in the bullet before the bullet is fired.

In some guns, the lede is used to swage down a larger diameter bullet before it enters somewhat smaller diameter rifling. This was used to allow German Mauser model 88 rifles to shoot the larger diameter spitzer bullet developed for the German model 98 Mauser. Similar engineering is used by Ruger in their Mini-30 (7.62X39) because of the variation in bullet diameters for that cartridge.

.22 Short and Long cartridges fired in .22 LR bored chambers have more lede than do .22 LR cartridges fired in that same chamber.

A slowly tapered drill could cut away the rifling immediately in front of the chamber, increasing the lede of your rifle. By removing the lands to the height of the grooves, you will have increased the lede and the extended portion of your longer cartridge cases will have nothing to hold them against the pull of the extractor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
fflincher; That's a lot of knowledge there. That would be a good job for a gunsmith. I'll think about that, but in the meantime - I'll just continue to :Blasting_ :Blasting_ :Blasting_ a few rounds between cleaning.

Thanks Sage
 
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