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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Abused 572 Fieldmaster

Picked up a very abused Remington Fieldmaster 572 last Saturday. It is barrel marked BO, (Jan,1977), and also helpfully stamped 1977. Rifle had lots of deep metal and stock scratches, the receiver, aluminum on this rifle, had some serious finish damage, looks like rifle has bounced around behind the seat or in the trunk, or maybe fell down a flight of stairs more than once. Rifle looked much worst than the attached pictures indicate.



After cleaning out the filth the bore proved to be excellent, dropped the trigger group (looked like that had never been done before) Removed bolt and gun scrubed everything out, looked as good on the inside as it looked bad on the outside. removed stock, this rifle unlike my 1968 552 Speedmaster had the Remington Poly finish. This caused a problem, my solution to refinishing poly coated stocks has always been to sand them off, but this rifle has checkering and I did not want to damage it. Since I usually use Formby's Furniture Refinisher to refinish my stocks (which from past experence will not even dent poly finishes) I went looking for a wood stripper that could strip the poly finish with damaging the stock checkering. Ended up with a quart of Jasco Speedomatic Paint remover (liked neat name) mainly because it listed on the can that it will remove Polyurethane finishes. This proved to be only partly true. I found that it took 10 applications of remover over 2 days and the very heavy use of a brass brush to get the stuborn Poly finish off, if it had not been so clipped and scratched up to start with I might still be working on it. If anyone knows of a remover that works better please let me know. I used Birchwood Casey cold blue on the steel as needed and applied their Aluminum Black, after I sanded it down, to the receiver. The stock, under the poly and all those dents and scratches turned out to be really nice grained dark walnut, steamed out as many dents as possible, gave it a light sanding with 220 grit sandpaper, and treated the stock with many coats of lindseed oil and tung oil. very pleased with outcome, saved another old Remington and some money (rifle cost $50. in its orginial condition) Olypenn22


 

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Nice job, and you did it all yourself! Lots of sweat equity=lots of satisfaction every time you shoot it.
Someplace or other I've read of a poly finish remover used in boat building...might be worth a stop at your friendly local marine products dealer.
I hear Brownell's Alumahyde paint is very good for applications like your aluminum receiver, although the stuff you used looks pretty good too.
Enjoy: it's great to bring a nice old piece back, especially if you can do it inexpensively!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Oquirrh, This 572 shoots perfect, but have not scoped it yet for a real work out, My other 572, a BDL which is scoped with a Tasco 4X shoots 3/4 inch groups at 25 yards using solid point PMC ammo. Function on both 572's is perfect, never have had a stovepipe or FTF, Both have good triggers but they are a little heavy. I also have the earlier Remington pumps, a 12C and a 121, My favorite is the Model 121, it has a great trigger and a redfield peep, if I could only have one it is the one I would keep. Saw a great one for $275 at the last gunshow. Sladsides, Thanks for the tip, good idea, will have no problem finding a marine product dealer around here. Have considered Alumahyde, may try it on my 572 BDL, it is next in line for a refinish, it has the poly finish stock as well. thanks , Olypenn22
 

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Methylene Chloride is the king of finish removers

Hello there olypenn,

Years ago for a summer job while I was in college i worked in a large plastics plant. Whenever we had to clean out one of the mixers, extruders, or injection molding machines we used a chemical called methylene chloride. This stuff instantly disolves any type of plastic or paint it comes in contact with. Methylene Chloride is a liquid. I later learned that this stuff is the active ingrediant in real paint strippers (those that actually work). So my advice to everybody is that if you need a good paint stripper make sure it says contains methylene chloride in its list of ingrediants. If is says "environmently friendly" on the can then the stripper does not contain methylene chloride and won't work worth a crap! Anyway, I am not aware of anything that will remove polyurethane faster and more completely than this stuff. Methylene Chloride evaporates quickly so you don't have to worry about any being "soaked" into your gun stock wood a few hours after using it.

By careful, methylene chloride was dissolve any plastic or paint including the plastic parts on your gun and the paint on your Buick. Use this stuff outdoors far away from any thing of value! Th vapors are harmful so outside use is a must.

nra4usa
 
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