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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After checking the trigger pull weight on my 453 Varmint, I found it to be between 14 and 15 ounces, after much adjustment and replaceing the regular spring with a lighter one. (This is the regular trigger, not the set trigger.) If I were to try and go any lighter, the trigger /sear will not engage. So, has anyone else with a 453 gotten their regular trigger to release at a lighter weight, and if so, how did you do it? Thanks in advance for the responses.

Ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In order to get mine to between 14 and 15 ounces, I replaced the stock trigger spring with one much lighter, purchased in a hobby store that sells spring and linkage kits for R/C airplanes. I also had to trim off several coils to get it to the right length. Trial and error for the most part. As for staying in the reciever, yeah, everything works just fine.

Hope this helps.

Ken
 

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In order to get mine to between 14 and 15 ounces, I replaced the stock trigger spring with one much lighter, purchased in a hobby store that sells spring and linkage kits for R/C airplanes. I also had to trim off several coils to get it to the right length. Trial and error for the most part. As for staying in the reciever, yeah, everything works just fine.
Thanks Ken. My local hobby shop had nothing, but true value had some 1/8" springs. They're a bit large but fit well enough for now. With a little careful trimming and fitting the trigger is now at 28oz. Plenty light enough for me. I'll still be looking for some springs that fit better but it's a start.

I'm still trying to figure out if there is any advantage to using the set trigger. I have all of the creep already dialed out of the primary and they share the same pull weight. I could see the usefulness being able to set the primary for say 2lb for field safety, and the set for say 1lb for the bench. But if they are both the same then it seems like just an expensive gimmick.
 

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I'm still trying to figure out if there is any advantage to using the set trigger. I have all of the creep already dialed out of the primary and they share the same pull weight. I could see the usefulness being able to set the primary for say 2lb for field safety, and the set for say 1lb for the bench. But if they are both the same then it seems like just an expensive gimmick.
I look at it as my summer trigger (set) and my winter trigger (when it is -28* below, and fingers numb).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm not really sure if there is an advantage to the set trigger. Speaking for myself, I do not like the set trigger because the over-travel seems like a mile long and cannot be adjusted out. On the other hand, the regular trigger has absolutley no felt pre-travel, no over travel, the trigger release is as crisp as snapping a pane of glass. So, as of now, I seldom use the set trigger.

Ken
 

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I'm thinking that the set trigger is just a marketing gimmick. That's ok as long as I can get just under 2lbs and with no creep and no over travel I'm happy - and I'm there. Friday is my next planned range trip. It's primarily going to be a center fire day but I'm planning on taking the 453 so I can see how she shoots.
 
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I don't think you understand the point of the set trigger at all, nor how it operates. The whole point of it is being able to have a trigger that is vastly lighter than the regular trigger. Obviously if you just make the regular trigger very light then the set trigger loses its usefullness. As I've said here many, many times, the rules for silhouette in hunting rifle require me to have a trigger that is heavier than 2 pounds. So, I have my regular trigger set for 2 lbs 2 ozs, and it's legal for silhouette. But it's obviously heavier than I would like for when I'm shooting from the bench. Enter the set trigger. It's much lighter, and makes bench work much easier. The point of it is to give you a lighter than usual trigger only when you need one, leaving you with a heavier trigger to use at other times. Silhouette is one example. Being out hunting with it is another. You probably don't want a super light trigger for hunting, at least not *just* a super light trigger. So, you can have a heavier trigger that's a bit safer for hunting, and if you find yourself in a situation where you can use a lighter trigger at the moment, push it forward, bingo, lighter trigger.

As for the set trigger's over-travel, well, you have to look at how it functions to see why this is an odd statement to make. The set trigger is just a lighter way to operate the heavier regular trigger. When you push it forward and set it, you're not transforming it into a completely different set of mechanics. It's still the same physical piece of equipment. All you're doing is giving the trigger a longer run at knocking the sear out of the way of the firing pin. The way the sear lets go of the firing pin is completely unchanged, as it is still the exact same parts involved. There just happens to be a secondary engagement ahead of that that happens to have a (usually) lighter let off. You pull that, and it then flies across and hits the regular sear off and away goes the firing pin. Obviously you can't adjust over-travel for the set trigger, because the concept doesn't apply. The trigger still has to move to the same point as the regular trigger to release the firing pin, because it is still the same parts doing that same job. And obviously if you stopped the trigger before it made it all the way back to that point, the firing pin would never move and the gun would never fire.

So, you have to know what the set trigger is designed for and understand how and why you would use it before you condemn it. If you only want a very light trigger and have no need for a heavier trigger at all, ever, then the set trigger shouldn't interest you in the least. If you could use a heavier trigger sometimes, and a lighter trigger sometimes, then the set trigger can fit that need very nicely. But you have to know what its purpose is in order to appreciate it.
I'm not really sure if there is an advantage to the set trigger. Speaking for myself, I do not like the set trigger because the over-travel seems like a mile long and cannot be adjusted out. On the other hand, the regular trigger has absolutley no felt pre-travel, no over travel, the trigger release is as crisp as snapping a pane of glass. So, as of now, I seldom use the set trigger.

Ken
 

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I don't think you understand the point of the set trigger at all, nor how it operates. The whole point of it is being able to have a trigger that is vastly lighter than the regular trigger.
That's what I thought and the exact reason why I bought a 453 rather than buy a 452 and drop in a Timney. Then I got it home and read this...
You can't really adjust the pull weight for the set trigger, as there is no provision for doing so.
No disrespect intended but you've confused the heck out of me. Which is it? I've reread your excellent trigger tuning instructions at least twenty five times and followed them to the letter. My preference was a 2.2lb primary and a 1lb set trigger but the instructions say it's impossible to lower the set trigger pull weight below the primary pull weight. I've measured both with a Lyman electronic trigger scale and they are with 1oz of each other over a 10 test average. If there is some magic that I'm missing I would be grateful if you could fill in the blanks. My only knowledge of tuning a CZ trigger comes from reading. :confused:

TIA
Steve
 
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The only adjustment there is for the set trigger is pre-travel. This can indirectly change how heavy it feels, since if you have to drag it a long distance before it lets off it can take more effort to do so, but there is no direct way to adjust how heavy it feels. There is only one single solitary adjustment for the set trigger, and that is for its pre-travel. You can adjust how far you have to move it before it lets off, and nothing else.

Now, unless you've done some modifications to the regular trigger to make it really light, the set trigger is incredibly likely to be much lighter than the regular trigger. The very design of the set trigger means it will have a fairly light pull weight. I think some people are confusing this with "the set trigger is always lighter than the regular trigger" and are carrying this to some rather odd conclusions, such as "if you get the regular trigger to 12 ozs, the set trigger must be way lighter than that!" That is simply not the case. The two trigger modes are largely independant of each other. The regular trigger is not designed to be an out of the box crazy light benchrest trigger. It's designed to be relatively light, as far as hunting triggers go. But it's still measured in the 'pounds' range when you unpack it from the box. And the set trigger is designed to be a good deal lighter than the regular trigger, and as it comes from CZ, it definitely is that. It's entirely possible to work on the regular trigger and get it fairly light. But again, that doesn't mean squat as far as the set trigger goes. The set trigger is what it is, regardless of what you do to the regular trigger.

edit - I just re-read your post and I've got a question for you. When you push the trigger forward to set it, does it click and stay forward at the exact position where you hear it click? Or does it move back to relatively the same position as the regular trigger? (I'm talking about before you have pulled the trigger, so it is still in the ready-to-fire state.)
 

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Im not a technical guru, but i do have some experience with the CZ550 SST, which the 453 SST is basically a copy of. my take on the SST is that its not the weight that you need to be concerned with, its the let off that needs to be light.

On my 550 i barely have to touch the trigger, once set, to get it to go bang. never had to squeeze it like the regular trigger.

BTW, im with Shorrty, the 453 SST is far from a marketing gimick. it may not be for everyone, but it has its place.

DW
 

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I shoot IR 50/50 with a 453 American in the Sporter class and a 453 Varmint in the 10.5 lb and 13.5 lb classes. Both set triggers are adjusted down to 3-4 ounces. I don't use the regular trigger at all and the set trigger is not a marketing gimmick!

To adjust the set trigger down to 3-4 ounces:

1. Loosen the "trigger pull" nut on adjustment A as shown inside the back cover of your owners manual.

2. With a jewelers screwdriver screw the set screw all the way in so that you have just enough set screw showing that you can lock the set screw with the nut.

3. Using the set screw inside the trigger guard to the front of the trigger as shown in figure 7 of the inside back cover, fine tune the trigger pull. With the bolt open push forward on the set trigger. Adjust the set screw clockwise until the set trigger will not hold. Then turn the set screw counter clockwise until the set trigger stays set. This is as light as it will go!

4. You should end up with no slack or creep, it should break like glass, and it should break at 3-4 ounces

This is not recommended for hunting, strictly bench rest shooting.

Good Luck!
PHIL
 

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edit - I just re-read your post and I've got a question for you. When you push the trigger forward to set it, does it click and stay forward at the exact position where you hear it click? Or does it move back to relatively the same position as the regular trigger? (I'm talking about before you have pulled the trigger, so it is still in the ready-to-fire state.)
When I push the set trigger forward it clicks and stays stays forward.
 

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Ok I'm just remarkably dense. Thanks to both _Shorty and Phil it's working properly. Don't ask me what changed. But when I went back and readjusted the set trigger both the set and primary came down. The primary to 21oz and the set to a 10 pull average of 5.9oz. Plenty light for bench shooting. I'll take it to the range like this just to see how I like it but I'll probably wind up raising the primary back up to 2lbs for safety and hope the set stays light. However once I find a round this one likes it will primarily be a bench rifle.

Not a gimmick at all once it's working right. :bthumb:

 
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No matter how you adjust the regular trigger, it won't affect the pull of the set trigger at all, because in that way they're not related at all. You could make the regular trigger five pounds if you want, the set trigger is still going to be just as light as ever.
 
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