Rimfire Central Firearm Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I started today in the summer project to refinish the stock of my 452 FS. Never liked the muddy finish that came from the factory. So; I began by applying paint / finish remover all over the stock. Most every firearm or wood project that I've stripped the finish from, this remover cut it down in one application. Not so with the CZ. First application removed maybe 40%. I dont' know what the factory uses but it sure is tough. Now I must wait for a day till the everything is dry completely before I apply the second assault with the stripper. Who'da thought that a factory finish would be so resistant to paint stripper?

When the strippin' & sandin' and fillin' & finishin' is done, I'll post some images.

Roger

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
58,022 Posts
I believe someone else had commented on the tenacity of the CZ finish, good for the rifle, tough for do it yourselfer's I guess. Please do keep us up to date on the progress.

Gerald
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I refinished a 527 .223, under that think nasty finish was a beautiful piece of walnut. It had figure that couldn't be seen through the factory finish. I can't remember what kind of stripper I used, but it just softened it up, then I carefully scraped it off with a butter knife. No sanding required. Refinished with Watco Danish Oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
319 Posts
When I refinished my 452 FS I used a stripper by KLEEN STRIP because my old standby, 5F5, was unavailable. It just wouldn't do the job and I ended up using a furniture scraper to get to bare wood. I also re-cut the checkering because after several attempts with this stripper and a stiff bristle brush the finish and stain still wouldn't budge.

I think that CZ may sub-contract their stocks. This might explain why my FS had hand cut checkering and my 453 Varmint machine pressed. This arrangement might also result in variations in the 'toughness' of the finish.

In any case I would encourage all Chechmates to consider refinishing their stocks. "Down with mud brown finishes! And up with....um....well, whatever's underneath them!" - Bill
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,871 Posts
Ive stripped a couple CZ stocks, the best thing I have found came from the auto parts store! Its in a spray can and says Aircraft Paint Remover on it, Ive seen it in Wal Mart in the auto section also. It took that stuff about 20mins to cut through the CZ finish, but when it was cleaned up and washed the finish was totaly gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,739 Posts
Has anyone refinished the beech stock? Would I re-stain?
I have done a few Beech shotgun stocks, you can stain it first if you like....
Or mix the stain with the oil, I did both on a particularly pale coloured stock, and it worked well.
After stripping the varnish I rubbed the stock down using Methylated Spirit and a fine 3M Scotch-brite pad, once dry (only take a few minutes to evaporate), then started the staining.
I used a dark Walnut stain, and applied stain until the stock did not get darker with each coat.
Once dry it is time to start the oil, I used "Danish Oil" rubbed in well with a 3M Scotch-brite pad, leave 24 hours between application, and oly put an ultra thin coat on.
The aim is to leave a nearly dry finish each time, if it looks wet you are putting too much on, and you will only have to work very hard to take it off again if you let it dry like that.
How long you go on for is up to you, but every evening for a month is enough for most people.
If you are really brave, you could, after staining it, french polish it, looks great, but is not so easy to cover over any scratches it will pick up in use.

Neil. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm now up to 4 applications of stripper. It's Kleen strip heavy duty. Essentially gelled methylene chloride. It is removing the finish but sloooowly. I'm going to trot on out and get that aircraft stripper that Shootnut suggested.

When I'm done, I'll post the pictures. I believe that all of you know what a CZ stock looks like from the factory so I won't do the before images.

I will however include some images of my pops .222 rem. that I just finished saving from a fate with non-gun family. It was pretty sad when I got it after 10 years in purgatory. (The ole man was probably rolling over at high speed in his grave about that .222, he loved it dearly & would never let anyone touch it.) It took about two months of part time work. (pretend it's a rimfire for the moment so I can post it here. ;) )

Thanks y'all for the advice and support
Roger




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
I'm looking forward to see your CZ results. I use the Kleen -strip heavy duty stuff as well. It's worked good on even poly-epoxy type finishes so if the CZ finish is giving that fits it must be tough stuff.

Good job on the Remington. I know your Pop would be proud.

Let me know if the Aircraft paint remover works. That might another good tool in the woodbutchering arsenal.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Finally finished stripping it down to bare wood. It took 5 applications of Kleen Strip heavy duty and then three applications of the aircraft stripper. (Which also ate my rubber gloves.) following up with coarse steel wool and stripper together. Cleaning the old finish out of the checkering was the worst. A toothbrush sized fine wire brush and stripper helped a lot.
The grain and figuring is visible in the pics, but not too clearly, it is bare wood, nothing on it at all. It's drying in the house for a week to make certain all nasty chemicals are out of the wood. Then I start with thinned varnish in the checkering and some clear filler elsewhere. Then Helmsman spar varnish with up to 10 % Penetrol as a leveling agent. Usually 4 ~ 6 thin coats with 320 sand paper / 000 steel wool between coats. Two coats per weekend. Final coats with 0000 steel wool between coats or if I want a satin finish.





Roger
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top