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22-SSS (Sniper-Sub Sonic) ammo

945 Views 12 Replies 10 Participants Last post by  j.r. guerra in s. texas
Has anyone tried the .22-Sniper-Sub Sonic long rifle ammo? The brand name on the box is: Aguila, and it's made in Mexico I've "heard" that it's very flat shooting ?????
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flat shooting ?????

i wouldn't call subsonic ammo flat shooting by any standard.
it firs a heavy 60 grain bullet (compared to the normall 30-40 grain 22lr bullet). because of its weight it retains a lot of power at longer ranges and can hit quite hard.

downside is the long bullet usually requires a fast twist rate barrel to be fully stable (and accurate).
as far as accuracy in your gun..try it and see, some shoot ok, others won't.

if useing a silinser/moderator the bullet MUST be stable leaving the barrell otherwise it will hit the moderator and destroy it.
 

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The 60 grain bullet is very hard to stabilize in a 1-16 twist barrel. I have tried it in 4 different rifles and it is terrible, The bullet tumbles and goes thru the target sideways, a perfect keyhole 1/2 the time. I can throw rocks and get a better group.
 

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Resize the SSS w/the Paco tool and it shoots fine, suppressors and all

The only way I have tried to stabilize the 60-Grains SSS with success, is by resizing it (before shooting it), with the ACU'RZR tool by Paco Kelly: http://www.gunblast.com/Paco.htm

Two light taps with the dish punch rod turn the SSS into formidable .22 rimfire ammo, unlike anything else around. Note that when shooting the Paco-tool resized SSS the rifle or pistol need to be re-sighted in specifically for the SSS. Muzzle cans don't mind the resized SSS but hate the factory-delivered, out-of-the-box SSS.
 

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In my opinion I doubt it but I don't have a Paco tool either. So it's just my opinion after shooting them in my rifles. they were so bad I would be surprised if a Paco tool could help that much especially at 100 yards.
 

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Rimfire Kid said:
How about the paco'ed SSS on the ram(s) at 100 yards.
Would the rounds be accurate enough at 100 yards for the rams?
Yes.

I shoot the Paco'ed SSS at 150m from a bench rest. You can hear the massive slam! of the 60-Grainers hitting a gong (made of an old shovel), clearly even at that distance. More so than the Paco'd SK Pistol Match (or SK Standard Plus). The SSS shoots several inches lower than the SK, though.

Just sight them in (rifle/Paco'd SSS combo), at the desired distances and make sure that you don't flinch.
 

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my bro bought 50 rounds from a online ammo dealer and was shiped 500. for about $8 u cant beat that. :p i shot a few from his scoped savage bolt 22 and they seem to be accurate at the 50 yards i was shooting. i tryed some in my Pheonix HP22 (5" barrel) and they worked as well as any other round. he shot a rottweiler that was attackin his pups with his savage and the SSS stuff, shot it from about 30 yards away in the head and it droped lifeless in its tracks. id say it is good for medium game at ranges from 25 to 50 yards.
 

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These threads come up every once in a while, and I've been considering some things, so I'm going to post here.

Quick notes:
Some rifles seem to stabilze these without any modifications to the bullet.
Those rifles seem to be the standard twist rate (1:16).
Lightly Paco'ing the bullet always stabilizes it.
Some that have the 1:9 twist say it's not really all that accurate.
The faster a bullet spins, the more likely it's impurities will show up as wobble( read, overstabilized).

So,... maybe we could say that 1:9 is really too much. It may be plenty to keep the bullet from tumbling, but too much and causing a wobble. Maybe something like 1:14 or 1:12 in a standard length barrel would be good. Now, notice I said standard length. Why are some barrels stabilizing fine? At least two reasons likely. One, is that they may be a shorter barrel. It has been posted that 22LR ( exceptions being the Stinger and Super Max) make maximum velocity out of a 16-18 inch barrel. Most barrels are like 20-22inches. That will slow the bullet down, and also slow down the spin. That would seem to be even more likely in a subsonic bullet. So we'd probably get a lot closer to stabilizing an SSS with a shorter barrel. The second reason I could see some barrels stabilizing it, is they aren't giving the bullet an extra reason to start tipping over. Ie,.. they have a good crown. With a bad crown, it will take more spin to keep the bullet from tumbling. I think with a shorter barrel and a good crown, you might be able to stabilize it without modifying the bullet. And if it does stabilize, it will be more accurate than a 1:9 twist. Benchrest shooters always try to go with the lowest possible twist required to stabilze a bullet. That way the impurities don't show up as much.

Maybe some of those that have backbored barrels can speak up on if they've tried the SSS since then. I plan on doing it to my .22 soon. Even if it doesn't get the SSS fully stabilized, it should make it a lot closer, and also help out with other rounds.

Gene
 

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rcrdps said:
These threads come up every once in a while, and I've been considering some things, so I'm going to post here.

Quick notes:
Some rifles seem to stabilze these without any modifications to the bullet.
Those rifles seem to be the standard twist rate (1:16).
Lightly Paco'ing the bullet always stabilizes it.
Some that have the 1:9 twist say it's not really all that accurate.
The faster a bullet spins, the more likely it's impurities will show up as wobble( read, overstabilized).

So,... maybe we could say that 1:9 is really too much. It may be plenty to keep the bullet from tumbling, but too much and causing a wobble. Maybe something like 1:14 or 1:12 in a standard length barrel would be good. Now, notice I said standard length. Why are some barrels stabilizing fine? At least two reasons likely. One, is that they may be a shorter barrel. It has been posted that 22LR ( exceptions being the Stinger and Super Max) make maximum velocity out of a 16-18 inch barrel. Most barrels are like 20-22inches. That will slow the bullet down, and also slow down the spin. That would seem to be even more likely in a subsonic bullet. So we'd probably get a lot closer to stabilizing an SSS with a shorter barrel. The second reason I could see some barrels stabilizing it, is they aren't giving the bullet an extra reason to start tipping over. Ie,.. they have a good crown. With a bad crown, it will take more spin to keep the bullet from tumbling. I think with a shorter barrel and a good crown, you might be able to stabilize it without modifying the bullet. And if it does stabilize, it will be more accurate than a 1:9 twist. Benchrest shooters always try to go with the lowest possible twist required to stabilze a bullet. That way the impurities don't show up as much.

Maybe some of those that have backbored barrels can speak up on if they've tried the SSS since then. I plan on doing it to my .22 soon. Even if it doesn't get the SSS fully stabilized, it should make it a lot closer, and also help out with other rounds.

Gene
What you said above about short barrels seems to correlate with the link I attached above - in handgun barrels , SSS rounds seemed to be more accurate, maybe due to less time for spin to take full effect on bullet.

Its good thing .22s are economical to collect - buy 30 of them and try each with SSS until one shoots well and good with it - keep it and sell the others for more SSS :^)
 
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