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One thing I really like about the old Cars is they are simple Machines, and a simple Machine is a reliable Machine.
Simple, yes. Reliable? Me and everyone I've known who've owned 50's - 70s vehicles spent quite a bit of time with the hood up or on jack stands, including cars that were less than 20 years old. Much easier and cheaper to fix than modern cars, but they needed way more attention to keep them up and running.

I love classic US cars, have owned five, and drool over them every time I go to a vintage car show. I may lose my mind and buy another but it would have to be something recently restored (professionally and documented) and at a great price.
 

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Well in mid 70's when gas went from low $.30 a gallon to over $.50 a gallon you could buy many muscle cars for pennies. Was looking at a winter ride and found a 1968 GTO for $200 however it had the GM shifter and couldn't get it into reverse half the time so I passed. The next was a 1970 Mustang Mach 1, however the wife at the time asked the guy what kind of mileage to it get, he said maybe 10mpg if you stayed off the throttle, well that ended that sale. Ended up with a used 1972 Toyota pickup full of rust!
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Well dependability depends a lot on who originally made the vehicle, If you decided to by a Ford, or even a Mopar. Not faulting you for that lack of wisdom, but we were young then and just did not know any better,LOL. Being a GM and Toyota guy I feel obligated to poke some fun at you..

If neglect by the pryor owner was in play too..Yes that can cause alot of headaches too..I do not drive a vehicle newer than 1984..My 84 Toyota Tercel and my 1978 Toyota Pickup are ultra dependable.. if something would go wrong..It is very easy to work on..

We ourselves as youngsters were probably more responsible for the damage and repairs that were needed, than it being so much the vehicles fault..LOL We liked to modify stuff for the "better" in our youth..Those better mods usually never were better than way the factory made it..Those mods just caused us alot of headaches and cost us money to have them..Once you start deviating much from stock, the headaches always started..

I have always stuck to GM for the most part in older vehicles....But really started liking the old Toyotas about 25 years ago..
 

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I grew up with those simple but reliable vehicles. They might have been reliable by the standards of those days but compared to today's vehicles they are not dependable at all.

I just did a comparision between the suv I now own with 52,000 miles on it and the hot rod '57 Chey I once owned. The suv has has 8 oil changes and a battery. The Chey would have had 22.6 spark plug, point's, and condenser changes, at least half that number of plug wire replacements, and 26 oil and filter changes. Batteries and exhaust systems didn't last to long either. To be dependable they required a lot of upkeep. It ran and ran great when it was tuned up. Let it go just a little too long and it would barely go. The suv that weighs about the same as the Chevy gets an average of 12 mpg over it and at higher speed limits than back then. I am not even going into the differences in comfort and drivability.

I still like to look at the vehicles of old but have no interest in driving one regularly now. A little spin in one would be nice but that's as far as I would want to go.
 

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Back in the early 70's, (graduated 77) I had a part time job and was a saver, my cousin was working but didn't save anything, he came to me and says, buy this car for $125 and in a month I'll get it from you for $175, it was a '63 impala just like the OP's except it was in real good condition just not running, I got it and we had it running in no time, month later it was his, still has it.
After graduation I bought my uncle's 63 Nova SS for $100, sold it after getting married for $800 and thought I did great, wish I still had it, those were the days, sigh.
 

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Well dependability depends a lot on who originally made the vehicle, If you decided to by a Ford, or even a Mopar. Not faulting you for that lack of wisdom, but we were young then and just did not know any better,LOL. Being a GM and Toyota guy I feel obligated to poke some fun at you..
No problem; I'm a GM and Toyota guy too. Four of my five classics were GM and I also owned two new ones. I'm on my 4th Toyota truck. The Toyotas have been ultra-reliable. Not so much with my GMs.
 

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I love classic US cars, have owned five, and drool over them every time I go to a vintage car show. I may lose my mind and buy another but it would have to be something recently restored (professionally and documented) and at a great price.
You don't have to lose any sleep about that happening. :LOL:

Anyone else add a qt of Mystery Oil per tank of gas?
 

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Some real talent in restoring old cars. Great hobby if you have the space,tools, time and money. Good money to be made selling rich old farts back their youth.
 

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You don't have to lose any sleep about that happening. :LOL:

Anyone else add a qt of Mystery Oil per tank of gas?
One of my subcontractors has a not too old Audi Q series. Says it takes a quart of oil on every fill. I’m sure he’s exaggerating a bit. But even a quart once a month is bad.
 

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Don't even get me started on water based paint systems.
Single stage only works on solid colors unless you're not planning on a cut and buff. Shot my '55 in single stage. View attachment 345525
Ran a collision repair shop for 40 years and don't miss it.
Looks like you took your work home with you.
 
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