Rimfire Central Firearm Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
I wouldn't call it a common problem, but it's by no means unheard of. I broke one recently by putting my Volquartsen barrel on an ML series Victor. It worked just fine for about ten rounds, then started failing to extract. Ooops!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,957 Posts
Mostly missing extractor

I'll wager that not all of your extractor is missing. If your extractor broke, there is probably a little square piece (the back half of the extractor) that remains in the hole. If your plunger is still there and you aren't able to slide it out then you've got the famous broken extractor syndrome. You have to dig that little piece out while holding the plunger to the rear. It would be very helpful if you could grow a third hand to complete this operation. You can get a new extractor through Brownells for about $15.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ordered two of them at Brownells today . I should have asked before ordering , but would any of you know what parts are prone to break ? I would like to keep such parts on hand . Thanks , claketyclak
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,957 Posts
Not much breaks!!

The High Standard "big button" design (models 102-107) is very robust and not much breaks. The extractor is one of the few things that can break and it usually happens as a result of operater error when removing or replacing the barrel. The slide must be held to the rear when removing the barrel. If not you will stress the extractor in the wrong direction. The extractor is most often broken as a result of putting the barrel back on the gun and having the slide inadvertently fly forward before the extractor groove is properly aligned. You can prevent this from happening by always having an empty magazine in the gun while changing the barrel. The empty magazine will lock the slide lock lever in place, thereby preventing the lever from relaesing the slide at an inappropriate time. The extractor will not break from regular use in the 22LR chambering. The same can't be said about the specialty High Standards (Olympic etc) chambered in 22short. They are notorious extractor breakers for a whole different set of reasons, but that's a different post.

The only maintenance procedure I recommend is replacement of the driving spring (recoil spring) every 20,000 rounds or so. Due to the vagaries of the design of the slide, this spring will actually start to wear thin in the center coils over time thereby decreasing its strength. The factory spring measures 5.5 pounds when fully compressed. As this spring wears, its poundage decreases which means its cushioning effect on the slide smacking the frame boss decreases. A very weak spring will lead to a cracked frame and thats a disastorous parts failure. Most every gun that I've seen with a cracked frame had a recoil spring that measured at about 4.5 pounds or less. I recommend replacing the spring with a Wolff 6 pound spring on a regular basis. For instructions on replacing the recoil spring go to my web-site click on the "other stuff" button and browse around.

One last thing, don't use the slide lock lever to release the slide, if you do you will eventually round over the slide corner such that it can't be locked back. Release the slide with a loaded magazine in the gun or with no magazine in the gun by pulling the slide fully to the rear and letting it fly forward of its own spring pressure.

Big button High Standards are one the great gun designs and are the standard by which all target guns should be measured. Shoot the heck out of it, only use standard velocity ammo, lube it with Clenzoil occasionally, clean it once every couple of years and it will last you several lifetimes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey , thanks a bunch for that site , and you hit the nail on the head :eek:
"things that can break and it usually happens as a result of operater error when removing or replacing the barrel." Oh well , a mistake I will not make in the furture . I aslo ordered one of those new light wieght aluminum 5 1/2" barrels with scope base . I love this gun , could be my MKII's will see a lot of shelf time now .
claketyclak
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lovin it

Got my extractor and things from Brownells yesterday . You were right about the piece still being in the bolt . But I got lucky and was able to slide the spring and plunger past the remaing part , which made the task easier . Replaced it , spring , plunger and extractor and installed my new High Standard LSP barrel with scope mount and a 2x6 Bushnell , all I can say is WOW! I think I will be seeing less and less of MKII's . Is there anything I can do to get the trigger lighter ?
claketyclak
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,957 Posts
Sear adjustment screw

Clack - refer to the 107 owners manual on my web-site. Instruction #3 is on trigger pull. Briefly what it says is that turning that little screw at the rear of the frame in increases trigger pull, turning it out decreases it. Each little click that you feel when you turn it represents about 2 ounces change in weight of trigger pull.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,130 Posts
Be careful when you turn the screw out to lighten the trigger pull. If you turn
it out too far the gun won't cock. If this happens just turn it in a little at a
time until the gun cocks consistantly. This has happen to me. the gun was
cocked when I loaded a new mag but would not recock during firing. I just
turned in the screw and all was well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
920 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks ftstinyc for the heads up , have you checked out jaybar's site ? A lot of good info there , sometimes I get my hands into to many fires and forget where the answers are , oh well , life is short .
claketyclak
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top