FN Browning Trombone - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > >

Notices

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-23-2014, 11:31 PM
old 39

Join Date: 
Dec 2013
Posts: 
443
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
FN Browning Trombone



Log in to see fewer ads
Anybody know much about Browning Trombones?

The gun was designed by John Browning in 1919 and FN produced it from 1922 to 1974. Apparently Winchester was planning to bring out a hammerless .22 pump at the time but couldn't because their design violated several Browning patents on the Trombone. It took Winchester until 1932 to bring out a hammerless pump (the Model 61, of course.)

The Trombone design wasn't terribly original. The feed mechanism borrowed heavily from the Remington Model 12 and the firing pin and ejector were basically copied from the Marlin Model 1897. What was original was the locking system. Most hammerless pumps cam the breech block up into a recess in the roof of the receiver. The Trombone cammed the block sideways into the ejection port and the rear of the ejection port was the locking shoulder.

Apparently the stocks were weak on the older ones and prone to breakage. Just about every trombone I have ever seen had either a replacement stock, a broken stock or a repaired stock. According to Wikipedia, the later trombones were better in this regard. I have one built in 1968 and that I have had for thirty years with no problems so maybe Wikipedia is right.

Apparently, FN and Browning had an agreement whereby Remington didn't sell its products in Europe and FN stayed out of the United States. So you rarely see trombones in America. In 1970, after the agreements had expired, FN brought 3500 trombones into the United States which would make them a scarce item.

In Canada, where I live, trombones were sold freely. They were greatly admired and coveted, apparently. If a man was poor, he bought a single shot .22, usually a Cooey or a Winchester. If he got a few dollars ahead, he splurged and bought a trombone. I have had several old timers show me their treasured Browning Trombones and speak of them in reverential tones. One can see why. They were machined and fitted to extremely close tolerances. They were slick and fast but so finely machined that there was no wobble in the action. In addition, they could be totally field stripped with just a coin for the take down screw.

And that's all I know about them.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-24-2014, 12:42 AM
chuckbiscuits's Avatar
chuckbiscuits

Join Date: 
Feb 2008
Location: 
West Seattle
Posts: 
3,327
TPC Rating: 
100% (17)
39,
I am lucky enough to have one in my safe. And unlucky enough that is has significant rust issues. The price was right, and frankly, I've not seen one even half as nice as mine since I bought it. HERE'S THE THREAD, if you're interested. Wow, hard to believe that was 5 years ago...

While it is my only pump .22, I believe it is one of the finest of that ilk. The only other one I've handled that comes close is the Savage 29. My buddy has his grandfather's (or great-grandfather's) Remington 1906 that's in pretty sad shape. Right before I found the Trombone, we managed to get it working safely, and that's what got me hooked on getting a pump. The 06es don't speak to me the way the Trombone does, and the 29 as well. I believe I am likely in the minority there, but I guess it's a personal thing.

Someday I would like to find one in better condition, but realistically, this thing was made to shoot, and a pristine example might not get that chance. I have fewer worries about dinging the stock or scratching the blueing, so there's that.

When I got the Trombone, I took it completely apart; partly for a "deep cleaning", but mostly just to figure out how it works. The quality of the parts, the fit and finish and the silky-smooth action belie how much it must have cost to produce. JMB's design, while perhaps derivative, just works well. The rifle feels like a toy; it's diminutive size, short barrel, small stock and light weight all contribute to this misconception. When you cycle the action, it no longer feels the same way. It clacks shut with authority, it ejects with aplomb, the forearm moves like it's on ball bearings. It feels like a Swiss watch. It is certainly one of my favorite guns. It comes to my shoulder like it was meant to be there. It is deceptively petite, but shoots the lights out. It makes me wish it wasn't illegal to hunt squirrels in Washington State.

If you're looking, I hope you find your Trombone.

Best,
__________________
cb
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-24-2014, 08:19 AM
bangbang's Avatar
bangbang
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jan 2007
Location: 
USA. Oregon.
Posts: 
3,500
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
i was lucky to find a well used one a while ago.

it hasnt been out, but its a funky mechanism.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 02-24-2014, 08:48 AM
Camster

Join Date: 
Sep 2003
Posts: 
13,993
TPC Rating: 
99% (54)
The stock issue was for a small percentage of production.Initially,they had a square receiver tang,which induced a stock crack.That was later changed to a round tang.
A quality product,I had one,built circa 1972,but found it difficult shoot accurately,due to it's light weight and relatively high trigger pull.Basically a sporter guy,it was eventually sold.I found it worthless when squirrels became attic vermin.Taking out my Walther KKJ soon solved the problem.

Last edited by Camster; 02-24-2014 at 08:50 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-24-2014, 10:26 AM
pump .22s's Avatar
pump .22s
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Dec 2010
Location: 
Deep East Texas
Posts: 
11,892
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I have one, a fairly early model. It has the screw type elevator adjustment on the rear sight but has the round tang. The gun is in excellent shape with no cracks in the stock....however, someone saw fit to drill a couple of holes in the top of the stock wrist for mounting some kind of tang sight....the only flaws in the gun. Because of that, I got it pretty cheap.

I'll echo the comments about the slick action....slicker even than the Winchester 61. I have also noticed the similarities to the Remington Model 12. I have owned several of these guns and my only mild complaint is that none were exceptionally accurate....functionally accurate but nothing to brag about.

Nice guns.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-24-2014, 01:29 PM
bn12gg
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Oct 2009
Location: 
Winter Park, FL
Posts: 
2,040
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I have one that supposedly dates to the 30's -- due to different batches of trombones that were shipped around the world the numbering is not accurate. Mine happens to have a metric threaded barrel. I purchased a fake suppressor for it and from time to time take it to the club shooting 700 fps CCI shorts -- makes me look suppressed (ha!).

Agree, it's not particularly accurate -- I limited myself to the 25 meter berm.

.02

David
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-24-2014, 01:44 PM
pump .22s's Avatar
pump .22s
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Dec 2010
Location: 
Deep East Texas
Posts: 
11,892
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Hey, a trombone thread and no pics? So, I'll throw one in....here's my old gal. I'm thinking made in the 30's or perhaps earlier:

Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-24-2014, 02:43 PM
chuckbiscuits's Avatar
chuckbiscuits

Join Date: 
Feb 2008
Location: 
West Seattle
Posts: 
3,327
TPC Rating: 
100% (17)
I'll play!

__________________
cb
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-24-2014, 03:55 PM
pump .22s's Avatar
pump .22s
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Dec 2010
Location: 
Deep East Texas
Posts: 
11,892
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Very nice!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-24-2014, 04:22 PM
jon p
US Army Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2012
Location: 
winder, ga
Posts: 
7,529
TPC Rating: 
100% (4)
beautiful pumps

i have never seen one til now! SWEEEEEET !
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-24-2014, 05:48 PM
Fungus's Avatar
Fungus
US Marines Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2013
Location: 
Kaneohe, HI
Posts: 
873
TPC Rating: 
100% (5)
Funny I wandered on to this thread as I was JUST on the phone with my brother about my Trombone (he has it in safe keeping while we're here in HI). I got it from my grandfather and it is in mint condition but none of the serial number "lookups" work for me on dating it.

It has a "blonde" stock on it and serial number 1431xx. I'm sure it is the round tang version and has a standard "ladder" style rear sight adjustment (no wheel). I mounted a vintage baby Redfield 4x on it and it will surely make short work of rabbits and squirrels and has done so on many occasion! Action is smooove as butta.

I'd post a pic but the 2600 miles between me and the Trombone presents a problem...

I think my favorite attribute of this rifle is that it seems to eat anything you want to feed it! CBs, shorts, longs, whatever, it doesn't mind at all.

EDIT: Just got off the phone with Browning and the fine gentleman looked it up! Born in 1972.

Found some pics online and this one below could be the twin to the one I got from my grandfather...


Last edited by Fungus; 02-24-2014 at 06:00 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 02-24-2014, 06:07 PM
Camster

Join Date: 
Sep 2003
Posts: 
13,993
TPC Rating: 
99% (54)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fungus View Post
Funny I wandered on to this thread as I was JUST on the phone with my brother about my Trombone (he has it in safe keeping while we're here in HI). I got it from my grandfather and it is in mint condition but none of the serial number "lookups" work for me on dating it.

It has a "blonde" stock on it and serial number 1431xx. I'm sure it is the round tang version and has a standard "ladder" style rear sight adjustment (no wheel). I mounted a vintage baby Redfield 4x on it and it will surely make short work of rabbits and squirrels and has done so on many occasion! Action is smooove as butta.

I'd post a pic but the 2600 miles between me and the Trombone presents a problem...

I think my favorite attribute of this rifle is that it seems to eat anything you want to feed it! CBs, shorts, longs, whatever, it doesn't mind at all.
No serial number look ups should work because it's an FN,not a Browning.Browning designed,yes,but only a relatively small number were brought into the country by Browning.
A 143,xxx gun would be a late one,circa 1970-1972.The Trombone that I had,was number 144,xxx,and 1972 was about as close as I could date it.FN doesn't have any dating info for the Trombone.It's usually a matter of guesstimating,based on the number built over fifty years, ,and interpolating the info
I too,had a baby Redfield on mine.It's truly the only scope that looks right on this slender gun.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 02-24-2014, 07:28 PM
webfoot56

Join Date: 
Jul 2005
Posts: 
2,201
TPC Rating: 
100% (93)
trombone

Quote:
Originally Posted by chuckbiscuits View Post
39,
I am lucky enough to have one in my safe. And unlucky enough that is has significant rust issues. The price was right, and frankly, I've not seen one even half as nice as mine since I bought it. HERE'S THE THREAD, if you're interested. Wow, hard to believe that was 5 years ago...

While it is my only pump .22, I believe it is one of the finest of that ilk. The only other one I've handled that comes close is the Savage 29. My buddy has his grandfather's (or great-grandfather's) Remington 1906 that's in pretty sad shape. Right before I found the Trombone, we managed to get it working safely, and that's what got me hooked on getting a pump. The 06es don't speak to me the way the Trombone does, and the 29 as well. I believe I am likely in the minority there, but I guess it's a personal thing.

Someday I would like to find one in better condition, but realistically, this thing was made to shoot, and a pristine example might not get that chance. I have fewer worries about dinging the stock or scratching the blueing, so there's that.

When I got the Trombone, I took it completely apart; partly for a "deep cleaning", but mostly just to figure out how it works. The quality of the parts, the fit and finish and the silky-smooth action belie how much it must have cost to produce. JMB's design, while perhaps derivative, just works well. The rifle feels like a toy; it's diminutive size, short barrel, small stock and light weight all contribute to this misconception. When you cycle the action, it no longer feels the same way. It clacks shut with authority, it ejects with aplomb, the forearm moves like it's on ball bearings. It feels like a Swiss watch. It is certainly one of my favorite guns. It comes to my shoulder like it was meant to be there. It is deceptively petite, but shoots the lights out. It makes me wish it wasn't illegal to hunt squirrels in Washington State.

If you're looking, I hope you find your Trombone.

Best,
You must have a exceptional savage 29. I have had 2 0f those savage rifles, I do not own them anymore. Worse pump action rifle I have ever used. My Remington 121, Remington 12, Winchester 06, 62, 61. and trombone are far superior.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 02-24-2014, 08:02 PM
Just22s

Join Date: 
Mar 2012
Location: 
Stalag NJ
Posts: 
80
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
So how do you get a general idea of date?? I picked one up in 2010 for $100.00 sn31xxx and would be interested in man date.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 02-24-2014, 09:11 PM
Miller1036's Avatar
Miller1036
Law Enforcement Officer NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Sep 2005
Location: 
WI
Posts: 
479
TPC Rating: 
100% (6)
They are nice. Here's my blonde, but I've always been partial to brunettes. I like Flysalot's...alot.

Rick

Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:54 AM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x