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  #1  
Old 02-28-2013, 05:04 PM
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Second takedown how-to



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I'm going to do my best explaining how to do this. If I raise any questions, just ask and I'll try to answer them.

*Keep in mind, this is only necessary if you float your barrel. If you have a pressure pad, you probably wouldn't need to do this. Also, this doesn't necessarily replace bedding. There are many rifles with two take downs screws that still benefit from bedding.

Here I cut up an aluminum bracket that would fit on motorcycle handlebars. Ultimately it's just an aluminum block almost as wide as the receiver and 3/8" tall by 3/8" thick. We'll call it a "tang".

My tang was already drilled and tapped for the takedown bolt so I'm not exactly sure on the threads. You can pre-drill a hole and go through the steps I have, or opt to drill a hole through through the stock and tang all in one shot later on.

I'm thinking it may be easier to drill and tap later on so you don't have to try to hit a blind hole with your drill bit, but that's your call. I'll get more into that a little later on.

I epoxied the tang where I wanted it with 5 minute epoxy. I used the takedown bolt to adjust the height of the tang. I wanted my tang flush with the receiver because I didn't want to do any bedding. If you plan on bedding, you may want to adjust the height just above the bottom of the receiver.

Make sure you have the trigger group in when trying to determine the correct angle to epoxy it so that the takedown bolt doesn't hit the trigger guard.




I just eyballed everything. Get back and make sure the tang is centered and the takedown bolt looks plumb.



Once your confident in it's position, sand any casting marks off of the receiver. Sand the paint off and roughen up both faces. Then clean with alcohol and epoxy that sucker in place.

Don't worry if you get something off at this point. The epoxy can be broken off and re-applied. We just did this step to hold the tang in place when we're ready to drill.



Okay, you're doing great! Now we have to let that epoxy dry.

This would be a great time to grab us a cup of coffee.



Here's a great job for that Dremel that you're always wanting to bust out. I used the round metal burr grinder and the cone shaped burr grinder bits to hollow out the stock.

They do a decent job at removing the synthetic material if you do a little at a time. If I tried to remove too much material at once, the material would heat up and melt. I imagine the burr grinders would work just as well on wood stocks.

Since I didn't want to do any bedding, I was careful to not disturb the shelf that the receiver rests on. I also left a shelf for the tang to fest on. If you're going to bed, don't worry about this and remove all the material you want.



Here's the trickier part. Drilling the hole.

I was fortunate to have an extra trigger group to use as a guide, but I think you'll be fine without one. I placed the extra trigger group in the stock and laid the stock on it's side. I held the complete receiver with the other trigger group over the stock and eyeballed where the receiever would be if it was inside the stock. I used a pencil to outline the angle of the takedown bolt on the stock. This pencil line is used to determine the angle to hold the drill.

I used a small drill bit to drill the hole. I tried to invision where the hole in the tang was while drilling. I was off by a small amount but it still worked out. I used larger bits until the takedown bolt fit inside. I then countersunk a larger hole for the bolt head.

If you opted to not drill the tang ahead of time, You don't have to be as accurate with your aim. Just make sure you aim your drill bit to go through the tang. You should be fine if you take your time. Drill a little at a time and check that you're on the right track before going so far that you can't change direction if you have to.



Here's the recessed hole. I had to open it up a little later on with a round sanding pad on my Dremel.



When your bolt is fully seated, make sure it isn't too long. This is a good time to trim it to length if you have to.



I had some stainless 6X32 bolts so that's how I determined the size to drill and tap the receiver.

I practiced on a scrape piece of aluminum to ensure that I had the right combination of drill bit, tap and bolts.

I started off with a smaller bit, then gradually larger to the size that I needed.

After I drilled through the tang and receiver, I marked an oversized bit with electric tape to counter bore the tang only. If you have any doubts that you can drill only through the tang, then simply knock the epoxy loose and open up the holes in the tang.



Slowly start your tap into the receiver. Make sure to turn counter clockwise after every clockwise turn to cut the thread shavings loose. If you don't do this, your threads could get damaged.



Ta da! There it is. Use blue Loc-tite on these threads.



Ensure that your bolts are not too long and interfere with the operation on the bolt.

BTW, check out the homejob radius on that bolt courtesy of a belt sander. It can be done.



That's all there is to it. It took me a few hours start to finish, but I took my time and enjoyed it. Anyone can do this with regular tools if they just plan it through.

I assembled and dis-assembled the receiver many times to get the fit right and the hole right.

If you mess up, it's only wood or plastic or aluminum. It can be repaired or covered up. Just have fun and enjoy it.









If you have any questions, shoot me an email and I'll try to answer them as best I can. Thanks for reading and happy shooting!
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  #2  
Old 02-28-2013, 08:16 PM
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Nice rifle. Interesting info.
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Old 03-01-2013, 09:20 AM
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that is some nice work there.
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Old 03-01-2013, 01:52 PM
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Thank you for the compliments!

Vincent gave me a good idea of how to do it. I think there used to be a sticky here on how to do something very similar it but was removed.
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Old 03-01-2013, 02:21 PM
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Nice job!!

Very nice! To me this is one of the best ways to add a second take down. It is virtually invisible .

If you do a wood stock an escutcheon could be added with very little added work. It is certainly easier than adding a Kidd type rear take down.

I would add some bedding under the block in a wood stock.

Very nice job on the Thread and it will be added to the SuperStock Tech Stickie.
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:45 PM
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This is GREAT imo.

I had the exact same idea only with a very small difference in the tang itself.

Have it all planned out including having made the escutcheon/pillar for my walnut DSP.

Figured I would probably go thru with it sooner or later but after seeing this one done it is going to be sooner!

VERY glad I came across this!



I know where to post the pics when done.
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Old 11-11-2014, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by 86c View Post
This is GREAT imo.

I had the exact same idea only with a very small difference in the tang itself.

Have it all planned out including having made the escutcheon/pillar for my walnut DSP.

Figured I would probably go thru with it sooner or later but after seeing this one done it is going to be sooner!

VERY glad I came across this!



I know where to post the pics when done.
Please do follow yours with pictures and if it is a lot different that this one we will make it another, separate, Stickie. If it is very much like this we will just include it here. Either way it will be a very good thing.

For me the scary part is drilling into a very nice finished stock. This would be a great mod if you were already finishing a stock or refinishing one.

While I know many 22s have a single take down this is one place I think Ruger missed the boat on the 10/22. From a production stand point the tang could be part of the original investment casting and it would be so simple on a production line to drill the stock at the same time that all the inletting and drilling is being done.

Might just be another place where the bean counters won out because it would add $3 to the cost of producing the rifle and the profit margin on a 22 rifle is already very slim.

Thanks again to Dead Eye for such a nice tutorial
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Old 11-11-2014, 03:22 PM
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Will do.

I found this thread sifting thru the links to threads in one of your stickies.

Had I not found this first I would have gone ahead and started a new thread.

If Dead Eye is around there is a thread in the making/modifying section that shows how I made a flanged brass thread-in pillar that is the cat's meow for a plastic carbine stock. Add the rear tang to that and it's a good combo. I would never have installed the thread-in pillar in my DSP but for having been boxed into a corner by a screw up at the factory combined with a mishap on my part caused by getting frustrated with normal pillar install and breaking out the bottom around the factory escutcheon. I originally made the thread-in pillar specifically for plastic stocks.

If I were Dead Eye I would at least install a factory escutcheon in the rear for good measure and good looks both.





I'll just say that my plan was actually to use angle aluminum bolted to the rear of the receiver in similar fashion.

One major difference in my plan was to use a transfer punch to locate the hole in the tang after the tanged receiver is set in the perfect location and the thru hole has been drilled in the stock.

I can see where a pillar is a challenge in the rear in a plastic stock but imo very doable and very good thing as well. There, in the factory carbine plastic stock, my idea would be to use a particular style of threaded insert of which I have but have not used (yet) for that purpose.

For the DSP I plan to use a brass inline tubing adapter with one barbed-stem cut off for the flanged-escutcheon with the end of the stem contacting the bottom of the tang. I have it made. Plan to use it. But you know how things can change in mid stream sometimes. The flanged escutcheon thru hole is counter-sunk for a 45* brass flat head 12-24 slotted screw. I selected the particular barbed tubing adapter because the bulkhead (flange for the escutcheon) because it was the smallest o.d. flange at .50" with the right size stem/thru hole and had enough meat to countersink for a flat head screw. Now it's one piece and once epoxied in should be very strong, flush, look nice, hold tight. It is possible I might change my mind and go with a threaded insert in the end as that makes getting the depth easy and the threads inserts are mega-strong/tight if the right one is installed the right way. Not as classy a look however and that is the problem for me with the DSP I want it to look nice when done. Function has to come first however. We shall see.

Anyway, thanks to both of you for putting this up and putting it where it can be found.

This is the pillar I made specifically for plastic stocks.





Here is the thread on that part.

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=560033

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Last edited by 86c; 11-11-2014 at 03:26 PM.
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Old 11-11-2014, 03:52 PM
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I read the thread when you did it and it is an interesting idea. That is what is fun here everyone is always thinking.

I like the idea of a piece of angle aluminum in the back. Years ago some one else did it and I want to say it was Squawsatch, one of our brilliant knife makers, but then him and his dad Sawdust (who started our first "game" the 1/4" Club) were doing a number of interesting rifles I think they used that trick.

He did a bunch of neat stuff but all the pictures are now dead as the site that hosted their pictures folded. As soon as I get a decent computer again I think I can put pictures to his "How I do SuperStock" thread one of the best ever. Turns out one of our members kept copies of the pictures and I intend to fix that one at least. It does not have the rear tang in it so yours is even more important.

Considering the difference in method and material I think a separate thread of your own would be the way to go and that I will add it to SuperStock Tech Stickies.
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Last edited by Vincent; 01-15-2017 at 01:40 PM.
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Old 11-11-2014, 05:48 PM
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Yes indeed. You know I only recently came to the conclusion that I really wanted to try a rear tang and was surprised that when I started looking thru the rear tang stickies that I couldn't find any examples of this method.

Just the fact that I know someone else had the gumption to do it and post pics and not just speculate about maybe thinking about thinking about it has renewed my resolve to do it.

This piece of angle is scrap for demonstration purposes only. It is not the finished height or width and has holes from days gone by. It is the material I have selected at least for my first attempt. The hole that the screw is currently sticking up thru for demonstration of concept is way farther back than it will be. In reality it will be such that the screw will contact the vertical wall of the angle AL. Tight in more like Dead Eye's.

The brass pillar is also a demo but the only difference is it is not cut to length prior to cutting off one stem. The reason is I was primarily interested in making sure I could counter sink the head of the screw to fit with a slight recess w/o making the pillar too thin in the process. It turned out fine. In reality, I would not cut the unused stem off until the pillar stem was already cut to the correct length for the purpose of fixturing the part to cut the pillar stem accurately.

The screw shown is obviously way too long. However, they don't come in the correct length needed for this assembly so a very long screw fixtures nicely to be cut accurately to final length so that is the screw I will use.

It is going to take me a while to get it done and write it up with pics. In the meantime for anyone not wanting to wait looking for ideas to draw from here is mine in the works.

The thru hole needed in the wood for the barbed pillar is 11/32" (.34") for a press fit with epoxy for adhesion. The counter bore for the flange is .05" by ??? I want to say 2mm or .08" but forget and it can be thinned with a file of course. All in all, I find it a pretty good fit thus far.









For the pocket, I will first drill the thru hole for the take down screw. I have a jig already made for holding the stock in the correct position for accurate drilling with the press.

After that I will hand drill a hole in the rear bed to intersect with the take down thru hole so when I remove material I will know where I am going.

The pocket will be a triangle with a flat bottom same deck height as the receiver bed ledge.

I will be cutting the pocket to the desired opening with a 1/4" and 1/2" wood chisels. Not difficult at all.

The only possible snag I see is that due to the length of the tang (mine goes back a good bit farther than Dead Eye's) might not let the trigger group go into its seat w/o interference. I think it will clear but it if does not it won't be a big deal to me as I will just remove the ledge that allows the trigger group to be the rear hold down. It will not longer be needed and thus not missed.

I will certainly let you know when I have it done.

Not telling anyone what to do here but I would have put this thread in the 1022 stock making and modifying section. That is what I had figured on previously.

Last edited by 86c; 11-11-2014 at 05:52 PM.
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Old 11-11-2014, 06:45 PM
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It really is a slick way to do it, but altering the receiver by drilling more holes just goes against my traditional values.

I got up enough nerve to place a clean out hole in one..and kind of grossed myself out...

But..ain't mine

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Old 11-11-2014, 07:13 PM
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It really is a slick way to do it, but altering the receiver by drilling more holes just goes against my traditional values.

I got up enough nerve to place a clean out hole in one..and kind of grossed myself out...

But..ain't mine

God Bless America-
pipestone
Kind of depends on the rifle too. If you got the oldie recently then I would think twice about it. On any 80,s or 90,s and especially anything from this century run of the mill 10/22 I would not be bothered by it.

I am with you on preserving the old ones as is. That is one of the fun things about the 10/22. Even if you have an oldie you can get Que to fix up a newer barrel for it an a later trigger can be modded and a little aluminum tape bedding and you have a stunning shooting oldie.

Yet when you want to return it to stock oldie it is but 20 minutes work to take the newer stuff out and put the old stuff in and you have done no damage to a classic 10/22. That is what I have done with my 1976 Carbine with the walnut stock and metal butt plate. The action is in a DSP stock with a Green Mountain Heavy Taper barrel but it could be put back together any time.
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Last edited by Vincent; 05-01-2017 at 10:08 AM.
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Old 11-11-2014, 07:50 PM
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Kind of depends on the rifle too. If you got the oldie recently then I would think twice about it. On any 80,s or 90,s and especially anything from this century run of the mill 10/22 I would not be bothered by it.
Yeah...know what you mean.

Really is a slick way to do it though., and DIY

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Old 12-24-2015, 04:58 PM
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work in progress. Want it to look as if it was a Ruger original configuration from the outside including the rear escutcheon and t/d screw matching original front.



A couple of stupid mistakes means I have to make another one prior to bedding the rear tang. Good enough for a dry-fit test run. Pillars in both front and rear. Two 5mmx12mm FH SS screws hold it on.


Last edited by 86c; 12-24-2015 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 01-31-2016, 02:18 PM
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Just an update on mine.

I was hoping that the rear tang would, for the first time, allow me to get a better result with the barrel 100% free-floated over fully bedded barrel channel (after removing all wood to barrel/receiver contact) with silicone rubber. Sorry to say it did not happen. Still shoots better rubber bedded.

Also, while I LIKE the way it came out better than simply shimming the receiver to get a tight hold down with the trigger group, I cannot say there was any magic regarding accuracy one way or the other.

I have another receiver that will eventually go into a Boyd's rimfire hunter stock and probably with a HT barrel. At this point in time, I plan to use the gunsmither button-bedded rear hold down instead of a tang and second hold down screw.

All that said, I still think the second hold down screw in from underneath, pillared, bedded, with an escutcheon that retains the screw, identical to the oem hex screw in the front is pretty darned cool! I like not having to take the scope off to get the barreled action out and still have a second screw.

I will refer to this method from now on as the 'sporter-style' rear hold down.

Last edited by 86c; 01-31-2016 at 02:21 PM.
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