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Old 12-15-2012, 12:19 AM
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TacSol Vantage Rear Tang Inletting and Bedding



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So, a few Vantage owners have asked me to post pics of my Vantage stock when I did the rear tang inletting and bedding. Below is a synopsis of my bedding process.
The Vantage has a front pillar, from the factory. It's Aluminum/Alloy. So far, I haven't decided if I will remove it and rebed the front/ Vblock area with a brass flange pillar.

My Process not the RIGHT way, just what works best for me...


First of all, all work that I do when bedding a rear tang is done with the trigger group removed, working with the barreled action only. The first step involves removing the rear tang from the receiver, installing the barreled action into the stock, and wrapping layers of electrical tape around the barrel to get it centered in the barrel channel and the height set correctly.

The rails on the bottom of the receiver should contact the ledge on the inside of the stock evenly from front to back on both sides. If you try a free float and the rails of the receiver do NOT contact the rails on the inletting of the stock, you have to either bed the rails (extremely time consuming, and a pain in the *** to get right) or inlet the barrel channel, which is much easier.
That is, assuming that the inletting in the stock is true to begin with. Next, I apply a layer of blue painters tape to the stock behind the receiver well to protect the wood from tool work, as well as to catch any chips that may try to get away from you during the inletting process.

I then reinstall the rear tang and leave the receiver in the well, tracing the rear tang as close to its outer margin as I can onto the blue painters tape with a fine ballpoint pen. Then I scribe the line repeatedly with an X-Acto knife, going deeper each time to a minimum depth of 1/8 inch.

Next, I use a straight cylindrical cutting bit on the Dremel to outline the inletting margin, usually cutting to about one third the overall depth necessary for the rear tang. MAKE SURE that the bit cuts INSIDE the markings, so you don't remove too much. You can always go back and remove a little more as needed. I then remove the material from the center of the rear tang inletting area, using small and large sanding drums. The half-inch sanding drum will be the go-to tool when finishing this process.


Then I repeat the process, cutting deeper with a cylindrical bit around the margins, keeping the walls flush then removing material from the center. You can get away with some inaccuracy here, as you will be widening the entire inletting area to make room for a layer of bedding, I have found that making the bedding compound thicker is better for strength and longevity. Just make sure you don't remove material outside the lines.

IMPORTANT:::
Repeatedly reinstalling the barreled action with rear tang throughout the process, including the takedown screw as you near the finish is an essential step to getting this right, especially the first or second one that you do. Check and recheck the fit, including contact of the lower receiver rails on the ledge and position of the barrel as well as contact with the Vblock area.

Once I have the depth of the inletting for the rear tang correct, I use a half inch drum sander to widen that area to make room for the Devcon, and true up the floor of the rear tang inletting using a cylindrical cutting bit or cylindrical polishing stone. Dremel makes a small rotary saw bit that does a nice job for cleaning up/truing the 90 angle in the floor of the rear tang bedding area.
Getting the floor of the rear tang area flat and level makes the whole process go a lot smoother.
Don't worry too much if the inletting in the floor goes a little deeper than you need it to; the Devcon will fill it in nice and flat when you bed it.

Then I drill the hole for the rear escutcheon in the floor of the rear tang area, starting small and increasing drill bits size in stepwise fashion to keep the hole centered and get the depth correct. If you go too far on the depth, not to worry. The escutcheon will be bolted tight to the rear tang during the bedding process so it's depth is self adjusting, but it is essential that you fill the void for the escutcheon sufficiently with mud to prevent air pockets.

Over filling is fine, but you need to be ready to clean up the excess that squeezes out. Devcon cleans up fine with acetone, having plenty of rags and Q-tips on hand is a good idea.

One trick I learned from Azguy file or cut a ring shaped RECESS/GROOVE around the circumference of the outer surface escutcheon on its outer diameter, and cut a similar recess/ring into the walls of the escutcheon inletting area. This will provide grip for the bedding compound as well as a mechanical lock on both the escutcheon and walls of the escutcheon recess.

I also drill anchor holes in the sides and floor of my bedding jobs, and use a syringe and large bore needle to inject Devcon into the anchor holes for a better mechanical lock. Once everything is ready, apply release agent to the rear tang itself as well as the bolt and threads, I also coat the threads on the inside of the escutcheon. Apply Devcon to all surfaces of the receiver that might make contact including a layer on the rear tang. Remember that Devcon is a thick putty but WILL RUN under pressure, so when in doubt, WAX IT!!!

I let mine gravity settle, cleaning up excess mud that squeezes out as I go then I install the front takedown screw and some surgical tubing in the center of the receiver for good measure.
Allowing the bedding compound to run around the back of the receiver if there is any gap there is also a good idea, but make sure to remember to apply release agent to the receiver.

After it is dry and you crack it, install the trigger group. You may need to remove some of the material from around the ledge that cams into the trigger group underneath the rear of the receiver.

*****My philosophy is to remove as little as possible to gain clearance. I apply a transferable contact marker lipstick and remove whatever is necessary. Rather than removing the entire ledge, removing only the contact areas that hinder assembly of the action into the stock makes for a nice snug repeatable fit that maintains some of the "Cam in" properties of the original Ruger design.


Pics to follow

DrGunner

Last edited by DrGunner; 03-20-2015 at 06:10 PM.
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:25 AM
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Here are pics of the inletting, with the barreled action installed and with it removed, before bedding.

I used a dremel only during this job. Here are the bits I use:




The next two are during test fitting, when more material needed to be removed to true up the sides and rounded apex:





These pics were taken with the action screw in and snug. Note the gap behind the back of the receiver. I decided to bed the rear surface and corners on this stock.

More to come...

DrGunner
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:27 AM
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These are taken when inletting is complete, before bedding. All is taped, prepped, and ready to go...





DrG
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:30 AM
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These are shots of the inletting and anchor holes, with the action removed, just before bedding...





Here is the Kidd escutcheon, roughed up on the bottom with a groove cut for mechanical lock...





DrG

Last edited by DrGunner; 12-19-2012 at 04:42 AM.
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:33 AM
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These are after Devcon was applied, and is setting up. At this point, I leave the bedding compound "proud", sticking up above the rear tang and stock.
As it sets, I remove one layer of blue tape, and smooth the surface of the bedding with Qtips and rags soaked in acetone.







DrG
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:36 AM
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Here it is after the Devcon has been final shaped.
Time to put it up for the night and crack it in the morning...





The bedding compound is just slightly above level with the rear tang and stock.
It will shrink, ever so slightly, and should look good tomorrow.

I will crack it tomorrow and post more pics over the weekend.

DrGunner
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Old 12-15-2012, 04:56 AM
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Once again you've done an amazing job inletting for the rear tang Great write up too. I'm looking forward to seeing the final product tomorrow
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Old 12-15-2012, 11:26 AM
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Nice work Doc. You are an artist with the Dremel tool guy.
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Old 12-15-2012, 12:16 PM
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It's tomorrow already how's it look how's it look???
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Old 12-15-2012, 01:45 PM
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GREAT JOB
If you do that well on an inanimate object I would love to see your handiwork with a scalpel.

"Surgical precision" comes to mind each time I see your posts.

John
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Old 12-15-2012, 04:56 PM
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Wanna borrow one of these to test out that bedding??????



The rear tang looks great!!!!!!!!

John
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Old 12-15-2012, 05:28 PM
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Excellent tutorial thanks for taking the time to explain it all. I don't think I could afford that at your normal "shop rates".
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Old 12-15-2012, 07:28 PM
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I just cracked it, and I outdid myself.... One of my best. I still have to lightly file the top surface of the Devcon...
Here are pics with tape removed, action in before final filing/sanding of the top surface of the Devcon. I will get to that tonight or tomorrow...




DrG

Last edited by DrGunner; 12-15-2012 at 07:45 PM.
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Old 12-15-2012, 07:54 PM
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I opened this one and just said "WOW!!!"

Here's the inside of the rear tang bedding work. Nothing more to be done except shape the top, visible exposed surface of the mud, which is purely cosmetic.
Mechanically, I don't think I can do better.








I will do the final cosmetic work soon and post final pics.

Hope this helps some of you do your own, its not as hard as you think. If you TAKE YOUR TIME. I inlet wider than I used to, because I have found that a thicker layer of bedding compound is more durable and holds up better over time. Most gunsmiths will tell you that inletting should be at least 1/16-1/8" wider under bedded portions to allow for a thicker layer of mud. I have learned from experience that thinner jobs DO chip easier, and adjusted my technique accordingly.

Cheers!

DrGunner

Last edited by DrGunner; 12-16-2012 at 04:19 PM.
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Old 12-15-2012, 08:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcrowleyiv View Post
Wanna borrow one of these to test out that bedding??????



The rear tang looks great!!!!!!!!

John
Thanks for the offer, John- but with my chest cold and the weather here, I don't think I will be doing any bench work soon. Besides, I did pick up a Caldwell BR and I am working on a special wedge shaped bag rider just for the angled forearm on the Vantage stock. I have two of them shaped and stained. I'm going to set up my rest and test fit them soon. When I do, I will post a how to thread on making my bag riders. I found a little 3" pic rail that just fits between the swivel stud and end of the forearm on the Vantage. Does it ruin the elegant line there? You betcha.
Does that bother me? Not in the slightest. My safe queens get DRIVEN!!!!
LOL

DrGunner
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