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Old 08-22-2012, 04:15 PM
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Bedding With Aluminum Tape



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A Tutorial as requested by a number of people.

First let's get a couple of things out of the way so we do not have to argue about them later.

I am reticent to say I "invented" this process but when I first started doing it about 2002 I had never heard of it and I was a year from finding RFC. For a long time after coming here I was doing this with new stocks but had not mentioned it until I told Ricochet about it. If you knew Ricochet he was not going to just leave it there and when we had the SuperStock forum he did every one of his rifles by one variation or another. If you have seen his targets it probably worked for him But it is highly likely other people had tried the same thing.

I normally see this process as a step between no bedding and full glass bedded rifles. Good old Ricochet saw it as an end process meaning he was happy to stop with the tape. I even sent him a glass bed kit but he never got around to using it in the 2 years or so he had it. I usually think of it as a fast way of getting a rifle to shoot to 90% of what is capable of if completely and correctly glass bedded.

How well can it work? The rifle Riocochet's Tribute:

Made the SuperStock 1/4" Club, The 50 yard 13mm Funshoot and nemohunter's 100 yd MOA Game all while being tape bedded.

Further "African Rose" made the 1/4" Club and shot this amazing 50 yard target for the 13 mmFunshoot while tape bedded:




So I think that points out that it works. Does it work as well as "glass bed"? I do not think so but it is very close if you do it right and it is perfect for people like my friend Ricochet who seemed to be terrified of glass bedding a rifle or that, like him, changes stocks around often and is never really done with a rifle. It is certainly easier than glass bedding, takes almost no prep time where glass bedding is preparation intensive to say the least!

Why do we bed stocks at all? Because from the factory there is a sloppy fit. Due to this sloppy fit every time you fire the gun it vibrates and these vibrations make the action move around in the stock. It the relationship between stock and action is not the same for every shot accuracy will suffer. To over simplify a rifle is accurate because as the barrel vibrates the bullet will leave the barrel in the same place of the vibration every time. If the barreled action is moving around in the stock it is impossible to create nearly identical vibrations and if the barrel is not vibrating the same it is impossible for the bullet to leave the barrel in the same place on the vibration. When we bed a rifle we are trying to marry the stock and barreled action as closely as possible.

So let's back up just a minute.....pillar bedding, What is it and why do you do it? First of all let's separate pillar "bedding" because pillar bedding is not truly bedding at all. It's MAIN function is to make it impossible to crush the wood or other stock material. Some people will argue about this and they are welcome to their points of view. Correctly putting pillars in a stock can not be a bad thing but it has little to do with bedding the entire action and possibly parts of the barrelwhich is what this discussion is all about.

Bedding a rifle is done to make a microscopic fit between the barreled action and the stock. In it's extreme like centerfire bench rest rifles the two are permanently glued together with epoxy That is a little extreme for us. "Glass Bedding" as it has been called is using various types of epoxies with either fiber glass or powdered metal fillers to make the stock and action as closely fitted as possible. A release agent is used to keep the two from being permanently locked together. If you would like to see how I do this you can find that information here

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=195425

That is my version but like many other things there are many other was to do it. I would NEVER argue my way is best. It has been used successfully by a number of RFC people but there are variations on a theme and more than one way to skin a cat.

Finally to this topic, aluminum tape bedding. With this very thin aluminum tape I cut many "shims" made of this tape and stack them until it is almost impossible to get the action into the stock. I shim both sides and the back of the action. I may or may not shim under the take down tenon in the front of the action depending on if there is sufficient contact at the torque I plan to use on the front take down. Usually a few layers is a good idea. After a while this first application of tape is going to compress due to the glue on the back of it so at some point it is a good idea to go back and add a couple more shims to the sides at lease and possibly the back and tenon. I should take one step backward at this point. Before you start adding the shims of tape take some black electrification's tape a wrap it around the barrel somewhere about half way in it's length with enough tape that it will just barely go into the stock. This helps insure that you bed the action evenly.

Notice I said stack them and implied on the action but I have done it, in fact started doing it, by stacking them in the stock. Now most go onto the action but some, like in the take down area, I still put them on the stock. The tape sticks better to aluminum or steel. The only prep needed is to degrease the area so the tape sticks very well.

Okay I need to take some pictures and get them loaded into Photobucket. Because it may be a day or so until I can complete that process I am going to post this but close it because many questions will be answered by the pictures. Got a late start today and tomorrow and Friday will be loaded with Doctor visits I will get them in here as soon as possible.
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Last edited by Vincent; 08-29-2014 at 05:34 PM.
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Old 09-12-2012, 09:18 PM
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Hopefully I got all the photography done on this today. Tonight or in the morning I will put them on my hard drive and then up to Photobucket and back down to RFC and this thread.

I not only did one on African Rose but also did some on my 581 Rem bolt action and the change in the 581 was startling to say the least. From 1/2" groups at 25 yards to little tiny groups shot today by a former friend. This beautiful little rifle shot so bad I was considering rebarreling but if it continues to shoot like it did today there is no way I am doing anything else to this little rifle.

More tomorrow.
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Last edited by Vincent; 09-24-2017 at 11:56 AM.
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Old 09-13-2012, 07:21 PM
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Finally pictures!

The process is amazingly easy. As I said be sure the sides of the action are grease free. Here is where I start:



It is important to do the back. If your rifle pushes the hammer strut past the end of the action leave a hole for it to do its thing:



I just realized I did not take pictures of the other side but it the same thing. I kind of put a piece on one side and then on the other to make sure everything is straight and even. I keep going back and forth until the rifle has to be pressed into the stock. After shooting a while come back and add another layer or two because it WILL compress. The aluminum won't but the glue does.


I usually put a layer of two on the shelf in the stock where the action rests.

As far as the take down area goes I only do that is it is very uneven. How do I know? Lipstick! I have a tube in my 10/22 tool box (yes I do have a tool box with almost all the stuff you need to work on one and it goes to the range and the shop with me).

Anyway I smear a little lipstick on the bottom of the receiver tenon and put the rifle together, torque it my usual spec (for my 10/22 rifles this is always between 18-22 inch pounds). Then I take it apart and see if the lipstick touched evenly. If it is only on one side as sometimes happens I shim one layer on the side that touched and add three or so on the side that did nor touch. Try again. Usually (always in my experience) this evens things up.

Next the barrel support.
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Last edited by Vincent; 09-14-2012 at 03:02 PM.
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Old 09-13-2012, 07:56 PM
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Barrel support

The 10/22 is a single take down rifle and the barrel will need some support some place. A lot of people bed the first two inches out from the action.

The rifle above called Ricochet tribute worked better just exactly the way Ricochet used to do his and that is with a piece of inner tube (you could use aluminum tape) right at the fore end tip. That was weird and kind of made me smile when "his" rifle liked just what he did.

Both of these rifles and the rest of mine have the Green Mountain Heavy Taper or as the first one said on the labels Heavy Sporter. When they first came out I did a lot of experimenting with barrel support position and pressure. This picture shows where I glass bed the support in:





So far African Rose likes the inner tube patch support in the same place roughly even though it has the 19" HT so it looks like this "so far" This rifle has been a little fickle in that it has been the most accurate 10/22 I have owned at 50 yards but we had "issues" at 100 yards but I think it was a combination of a lot of SK that was so so and BAD mirage and you can't blame the rifle for that. Bedded like this:



It has shot a .463" 100 yard group but it also shot a 2.25" on the same target That is why I am blaming the mirage and I was not my best as it was 97 degrees out and probably humidity was in the high 80s. Perfect conditions for mirage over grass and perfect conditions to make me few like crap for two days after. But this target at 50 tells me this young lady wants to shoot:



Now I use aluminum tape bedding a temporary thing usually until I get around to glass bedding it but if this rifle keeps shooting like this why would I change it? It MIGHT get even better fully glass bedded but I would hate myself if it shot worse!!

Also as aside from the bedding when I got this stock the bubinga wood was a plain even orange color. Bubinga is an African Rosewood and it is really starting to show some amazing color, grain and those flashing high lights. After I get those pictures up on PB I will post them.

Remember folks I have NO claim to have invented this kind of bedding. I will never tell you the way I do is best because I do not know that to be true. If you have better or just different ideas feel free to post them but please keep it civil. Thanks for reading my tutorial I hope it helps
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Last edited by Vincent; 09-14-2012 at 03:08 PM.
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:16 AM
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Thanks, Vincent. I continue to learn from you.
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:13 PM
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Thank you Sir. You have been such a big help to me over the last 8 or so years. Here are a couple pictures of the grain starting to pop:





It really does not show in photos but if you look near the receiver/barrel joint area. Hard to see it but you can see it as a "lighter" area. If you have the rifle in your hands that is an iridescent shine as you tilt the rifle back and forth.

I should have the bolt version up tomorrow or later tonight. It is similar but not identical.

Thanks for looking
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Last edited by Vincent; 09-26-2012 at 10:31 AM.
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:45 PM
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Thanks vincent. That rifle keeps looking better every time you take a picture of it. Its amazing how the grain keeps popping more and more.
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Old 09-14-2012, 04:00 PM
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Hey Vincent. great thread. You said you did your 581. Where did to put the tape?. I have a several 580 series rifles and lots of old Mossbergs all having a tubular receiver. The old Mossbergs may really benefit from this as there old stocks have usually shrunk or worn loose over their 60+ year lifespan. A couple pics of the 581 would be nice when you have time. Your post way back on loading for the .22 Hornet helped alot also. Thanks.
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Old 09-14-2012, 05:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scooter22 View Post
Hey Vincent. great thread. You said you did your 581. Where did to put the tape?. I have a several 580 series rifles and lots of old Mossbergs all having a tubular receiver. The old Mossbergs may really benefit from this as there old stocks have usually shrunk or worn loose over their 60+ year lifespan. A couple pics of the 581 would be nice when you have time. Your post way back on loading for the .22 Hornet helped alot also. Thanks.
Thanks for the kind words.

The thread will be posted in SuperStock Bolt Action tonight or tomorrow. I will also put a link to it in the Remington Forum.

I will say that I was STUNNED at the difference it made in the 581. It is so simple it is rediculous and it made a huge difference in my 581. Much more than it made in this 10/22 but I have seen it make big changes in 10/22 also.
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Old 09-14-2012, 05:26 PM
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Looking forward to it! Thanks.
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Old 09-15-2012, 10:39 AM
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Thanks for the pics, Vincent. My sick & twisted mind was trying to figure out how it was supposed to work by stacking strips of tape along the narrow bottom edges of the receiver. KISS…
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Old 09-15-2012, 02:53 PM
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Thanks for the pics, Vincent. My sick & twisted mind was trying to figure out how it was supposed to work by stacking strips of tape along the narrow bottom edges of the receiver. KISS…
Actually you can do bedding that ledge where the bottom edge of the action sits and when I first started doing this I did that first. I used to cut a number of strips and put the edge of the tape on the edge the "shelf" and creased it against the side the stock and then smooth it up the side of the stock. I would do that for 3 layers about (.012" thick) and then the rest of the strips just went on the side of the stock. When I did it this way I did not put any on the action but it is easier to put more tape on the action.

Now if I feel the ledge needs bedding I cut 1/2" wide strips of tape and put the edge of the tape across the top of the self and smooth it down real well and either smooth DOWN the side of the stock along side of the where the trigger housing will go or if that is too tight (I do not like to bed ANYTHING against the trigger housing) I just trim it with a Xacto Knife. Not really easy but not too bad. I trim each piece separately because trimming three deep down inside the stock can be a pain.
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Last edited by Vincent; 09-17-2012 at 03:25 PM.
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Old 09-17-2012, 12:46 PM
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Thanks for your time and expertise. I think aluminum tape is good for several uses.

I have done some glass bedding, but it scares me everytime I do it. Sometimes I bed a section at a time, which may not be the best way.
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Old 09-17-2012, 09:53 PM
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Tape bedding ... !

... as you commented in your first post Vince, "... probably other people have been doing this for years ... "

Yes indeed ... I'm not sure when I first tried this type of bedding for my match rifles, but I'd guess it was on the Lee Enfield #4 Mk 1 I modified for the 300 Metre Free Rifle trials ahead of the 1948 Olympics ... I think it was pieces of Elastoplast adhesive medical tape in those days - lol !

Later ... when early versions of modern day masking tape came along, that became the material of choice ... over here in the States in the 60's I discovered this wonderful material that furnace installers were using to seal heating ducts ... !

I still use the aluminium tape these days for many such "padding/backfill jobs" .... sometimes it "stays" as a permanent fix ... at other times it's a prelude to a full scale Devcon bed. I used to have several references to the technique on my old "Fuzzy Limey" web domain, now defunct after many years. You may recall that the Aluminium tape is what both I and Doc Panisuan used in our original creep reduction modifications for the CZ.452 and BRNO rifles ... later to be "improved upon" by Eric with his brass tubing kits, and nowadays, YoDave. No matter what, glad to see that others still use and like the concept.

Mick - The Fuzzy Limey

Last edited by Fuzzy Limey; 09-18-2012 at 05:48 AM.
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Old 09-17-2012, 11:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fuzzy Limey View Post
... as you commented in your first post Vince, "... probably other people have been doing this for years ... "

Yes indeed ... I'm not sure when I first tried this type of bedding for my match rifles, but I'd guess it was on the Lee Enfield #4 Mk 1 I modified for the 300 Metre Free Rifle trials ahead of the 1948 Olympics ... I think it was pieces of Elastoplast adhesive medical tape in those days - lol !

Later ... when early versions of modern day masking tape came along, that became the material of choice ... over here in the States in the 60's I discovered this wonderful material that furnace installers were using to seal heating ducts ... !

I still use the aluminium tape these days for many such "padding/backfill jobs" .... sometimes it "stays" as a permanent fix ... at other times it's a prelude to a full scale Devcon bed. I used to have several references to the technique on my old "Fuzzy Limey" web domain, now defunct after many years. No matter what, glad to see that others still use and like the concept.

Mick - The Fuzzy Limey
Mick it is like I told some one here that "invented" another thing is the old saying about "A good idea has many fathers" and "Need is the mother of invention".

I pointed out to him that I thought of "intermittent wipers" 10 years before I saw them on a car but that did not mean I was the only one.

The 22-250 must have had 25 claiming fathers, too bad it is not like that for some kids.

Mick if you and I came up with this idea independently some 50 years apart than that puts me into very good company Company I am honored to be in.

I think I read somewhere just in the last year that some of the older Anshutz rifles used a cork tape bedding.
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