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Old 12-19-2011, 07:18 PM
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My VORTEK Tuned Diana/RWS Model 48 .25 Caliber ... One-of-Five



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I recently purchased a quarter bore air rifle.
Big Medicine: VORTEK Custom Tuned Diana M48 .25 Cal
Here's a few photos I've taken.

My initial impressions: this is a heavy man-sized rifle.
Rifle, scope and mount weigh-in at an unexpected 10.2 lbs.
And, in a standing firing stance ... my muscles felt every ounce as I struggled to hold steady on-target.
Not a easy task.
As I became fatigued very quickly.

In contrast, the trigger-pull was very light.
So light that the first shot went-off unexpectedly ... I was surprised.

Hawke Airmax EV 4-12x40, Map6 Illuminated Reticle

Muzzle Mac muzzle brake installed by 2nd owner ... really a muzzle weight
Barrel breech opening is huge ... very easy for a oldster to insert an equally large pellet.

Cocking the VORTEK tuned rifle is not easy.
Not being familiar with the best technique, it is not a simple task to fully engage the sear.

A couple of times, I got 3/4 of the way through the cocking stroke and stopped.
Thinking I was done.
When, in fact, the anti-bear trap mechanism had caught ... fooling me into believing I was finished.

Apparently, I prematurely backed-off my effort and the anti-trap took over.
Not being sure of my grip on the stock and questioning my grasp of the cocking arm.
I reaffirmed my hold.
Then, powered through the full-stroke.

Clearly, this is not a rifle for a slight shooter ... only the able-bodied need apply.
As an oldster of reasonable strength ... I can manage.
After I learned the technique that worked best for me.

What I most appreciate is the ease of loading a pellet in the easily accessible breech.
Plugging a large pellet into a big hole is a breeze - love it.

All in all, the VORTEK Diana M48 projects a no-nonsense image of purpose.
It is not a plinker or target shooter ... it is a hunting rifle.
And, presents the necessary sturdiness, power and precision needed to humanely dispatch backyard pests.
Without any of the unnecessary ... no checkering, no finger grooves, no recoil pad, no adornments.
In a word ... spartan.

If, and when, I garner the ability to muster reasonable accuracy from this powerhouse springer ... I think
I'll be a happy camper.

MORE ... LATER
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you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
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Old 12-20-2011, 05:43 AM
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A Few Shots With My .25 Cal M48 ... Backyard Friendly

As I mentioned earlier, the M48 with scope/mount is a heavy beast.
Just handling the rifle is a deliberate effort.
So, from a standing position I attempted to fire a few rounds at a target 15 yards away.
I knew I had a challenge on my hands.

I tried my best to find a comfortable position while maintaining a loose hold.
But, it was hard to do so when practicing breath control and holding steady while peering through a 12-power scope.
Moreover, the heavy weight caused me to man-handle the rifle while adjusting my firing position.

As such, I experienced the recoil of a magnum air rifle first hand.
The shot-cycle shoved against my shoulder.
While I felt a shudder from the rifle and the stock tweaked in my hand.

As the first-shot ripped through the edge of the front cover, deflected off the top-end and blasted through the back cover
of my impromptu backstop.
A 700-page technical school manual.
No, it did not penetrate 700-pages of material.
Only the front, top-end and back of the manual.
As each section consists of two layers of vinyl and one piece of thick stiff cardboard.
And, unexpected slammed into my privacy fence very loudly.
Instantly, all the dogs on my block began barking.

It was very disconcerting ... listening to all of the canine commotion.
But, after the third-shot without the pellet slamming into my wooden fence ... all became reasonably quiet.
As the two subsequent shots sounded like a small ballpeen hammer striking the technical manual forcefully.
An epiphany ... I really need to buy a silent pellet stop.

Still, the report of the M48 had me concerned.
So, I enlisted my wife to fire the M48 into a rather a large pile of leaves and lawn debris in a corner of our backyard.
This time ... the pellet would go quietly into a soft pre-compost pile ... not into the fence.
While I stood nearby, about 25-feet away in the general direction of the shot, to listen for rifle noise.

This time ... all I heard was a solid, distinct TunK emanating from the M48 muzzle.
Not at all objectionable considering the power being generated.
The description backyard friendly fits well - in my opinion.
The noise factor is acceptable.
Considering, it will not be shot often - only on an as needed basis.

The weather here has been overcast, windy and drizzling.
As such, I haven't had a good opportunity to sight-in my air rifle.
But, I did fire-off a few more rounds - as is without regard to scope zero.

My target was a posted note with a black-dot scribbled in the center.
As can be seen, there are three large holes above the single dot.
Horizontal stringing to be sure ... three different grips.
Please note the shot string is near linear.
Vertical shot placement is very close - not much deviation ... very heartening.
By the way, the last hole on the right was a called flier ... pulled-the-shot.
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you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
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  #3  
Old 01-29-2012, 06:14 PM
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Zero Set: 25 Yards or 2nd Dot Aim Point at 12.3 Yards

I took the time to set zero today.I've had some practice with my Schütze - sure helps to have a trainer.
This was shot from a window sill at a distance of 12.3 yards.
Why 12.3yds? This is the range indicated POI for the 2nd-dot of the MAP6 reticle.
Now, the reticle cross hair will be zeroed at 25 yards.

With this zero the point blank range of a 1/4-inch kill zone will be from 15.8 yards to 28.5 yards.
This is more than enough for my backyard.
The shortest shot I anticipate might be 8 yards.
I expect that the most likely range will be from 10 to 12 yards - 2nd & 3rd MAP6 reticle dots respectively.

It wasn't hard to walk-on the reticle to the aim point.
As a point of interest, the 1st group was on the lower left hand side and consists of 5-shots.
A two-shot group established POI at approximately 3/4-inch off-center at 12 o'clock.
I clicked some correction.
Then, fired two more shots.
Dialed some more correction and the last shot of the string is just to the left-of-center.

The 2nd group is the one on the upper right hand side.
The dead center of the circle was shot-out by the first three pellets I fired.
This created a black hole for an aim point.
As such, I lost the 2nd MAP6 dot (indicated 12.3 yds) ... resulting in the group opening-up.
Even so, the group could be still be covered by a dim.

The VORTEK .25 surprised me.
It as a breeze to sight-in.
Normally, I hate to zero a gun ... any gun, I dread sighting-in.

In the case of the VORTEK, I was avoiding the task ... until another day.
However, in my enthusiasm I soldiered-on.
It turned-out to be much, much eaiser than I had expected.

In fact, I found this .25 caliber lite-magnum easier to sight-in than my Schütze.
Hard to believe ... but, true - at least in my case.
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you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735
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Old 02-04-2012, 12:23 AM
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Recheck Zero After a Lesson on Thumb Placement

After shooting my Schütze, I decided to re-check the zero on my VORTEK .25.
My 240 has just given me a lesson on proper thumb placement.
I wanted to see if I could apply the lesson learned to my M48.

Please note the size of the 5-shot group is dime sized.
More significantly, the majority of the shots are touching with one pellet blowing a separating remnant away.
This was done without any warm-up shots on my part.
However, I did fire one random shot to loosen-up the M48.

Clearly, the lessons learned from practicing with a small, light-recoiling, springer directly translate
to proficiency with a much heavier, harder recoiling, spring & piston rifle.
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you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735
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Old 02-04-2012, 11:18 AM
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Cocking the M48 and Managing the Weight

My VORTEK tuned M48 is not the easiest airgun to cock.
In fact, after a few quick shots my breaths had become more frequent.
And, I have to stop for and take a few deep inhales to catch-up
with the level of effort.

Not a good situation, trying to practice breath control
when you're nearly out of breath and maintaining trigger discipline.

So, I think I've found an easier way to cock an M48.
Keep in mind, I'm right-handed.
With my left-hand, I hold the rifle vertically with an overhand grip
placed near the end of the forearm by the cocking handle.
I place the butt on top of my right foot while grasping the cocking handle
with my right-hand.

The rifle, held by my left-hand, goes left,.
The cocking handle, held by my right-hand, moves to the right ... forming a V.
Now, I smoothly push down and apart ... letting gravity and my body weight
to do the work.
Until the anti-bear trap mechanism stops ratcheting and the sear catches
at the end of the cocking stroke.

As I've mentioned all to many times ... my M48 feels heavy.
For one or two shots, I can manage the weight - OK.
But, with a shot string of 5-shots ... that's a different matter - it becomes work.

After some thought, I think I have a solution for steady backyard shooting and for field use.
I'm going to buy a set of shooting sticks.
A tripod system for the backyard.
And, a mono or bipod for field use.

Lately, I been using a makeshift shooting stick that I improvised from a push-broom handle.
It works.
But, it is not as steady or as easy to use as I would like.
Even so ... it helps.
__________________
W. Edwards Deming ... Quality: It is not enough to do-your-best;
you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735
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  #6  
Old 02-12-2012, 12:38 PM
Mike Pearson

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aom22 View Post
My VORTEK tuned M48 is not the easiest airgun to cock.
In fact, after a few quick shots my breaths had become more frequent.
And, I have to stop for and take a few deep inhales to catch-up
with the level of effort.

Not a good a good situation, trying to practice breath control
when you're nearly out of breath and maintaining trigger discipline.

So, I think I've found an easier way to cock an M48.
Keep in mind, I'm right-handed.
With my left-hand, I hold the rifle vertically with an overhand grip
placed near the end of the forearm by the cocking handle.
I place the butt on top of my right foot while grasping the cocking handle
with my right-hand.

The rifle, held by my left-hand, goes left,.
The cocking handle, held by my right-hand, moves to the right ... forming a V.
Now, I smoothly push down and apart ... letting gravity and my body weight
to do the work.
Until the anti-bear trap mechanism stops ratcheting and the sear catches
at the end of the cocking stroke.

As I've mentioned all to many times ... my M48 feels heavy.
For one or two shots, I can manage the weight - OK.
But, with a shot string of 5-shots ... that's a different matter - it becomes work.

After some thought, I think I have a solution for steady backyard shooting and for field use.
I'm going to buy a set of shooting sticks.
A tripod system for the backyard.
And, a mono or bipod for field use.

Lately, I been using a makeshift shooting stick that I improvised from a push-broom handle.
It works.
But, it is not as steady or as easy to use as I would like.
Even so ... it helps.
The reason why it seems heavy is because it is heavy! I've owned two 48's, one 52 and one 54 and they were ALL heavy, especially when equipped with a scope and mounts. Great guns mind you but heavy and, I suppose, heavy cocking for some. I think that you would have been MUCH better served had you bought yourself a Beeman R-7 or RWS-24. Both rifles are light, easy cocking and extremely accurate. I would also recommend both in .177. While the .25 IS my very favorite airgun hunting caliber, I think you'd get more enjoyment from shooting the more economical and (equally) accurate .177. Lighter guns can be made for this caliber without sacrificing any shooting comfort. --- Mike
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Old 02-12-2012, 12:39 PM
Mike Pearson

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Pearson View Post
The reason why it seems heavy is because it is heavy! I've owned two 48's, one 52 and one 54 and they were ALL heavy, especially when equipped with a scope and mounts. Great guns mind you but heavy and, I suppose, heavy cocking for some. I think that you would have been MUCH better served had you bought yourself a Beeman R-7 or RWS-24. Both rifles are light, easy cocking and extremely accurate. I would also recommend both in .177. While the .25 IS my very favorite airgun hunting caliber, I think you'd get more enjoyment from shooting the more economical and (equally) accurate .177. Lighter guns can be made for this caliber without sacrificing any shooting comfort. --- Mike
Also curious to know what velocities you were getting with different pellets out of the 48 (.25)?
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:02 PM
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No Chrony ... FPS Based on FPE

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Pearson View Post
Also curious to know what velocities you were getting with different pellets out of the 48 (.25)?
I don't have a Chrony ... at this time.
Been calculating velocity based on FPE.
Quote:
Originally Posted by aom22 View Post
BEFORE Velocity: Factory Stock State & AFTER Velocity: VORTEK Tune ... kinda says it all
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you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
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Old 02-22-2012, 08:06 PM
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Looking For: BSA Lightning XL in .25 Caliber

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Pearson View Post
Lighter guns can be made for this caliber without sacrificing any shooting comfort. --- Mike
Yep, been seriously looking at a BSA Lightning XL in .25 caliber.
WTB: BSA Lightning XL .25 Caliber --> Expand Thread on Feb 12, 2012 7:23 PM
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W. Edwards Deming ... Quality: It is not enough to do-your-best;
you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735
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Old 02-22-2012, 11:10 PM
Mike Pearson

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Originally Posted by aom22 View Post
Yep, been seriously looking at a BSA Lightning XL in .25 caliber.
WTB: BSA Lightning XL .25 Caliber --> Expand Thread on Feb 12, 2012 7:23 PM
Should be alot of fun! One thing's for sure, if you're a plinker, those tin cans will definitely move with an attitude!;0) Keep us posted! --- Mike
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Old 02-23-2012, 10:43 AM
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That's a beauty. Nice shooting too. Can't go wrong with those RWS magnum rifles.

I did the same thing when cocking mine the first time. Couldn't figure out why the trigger wouldn't engage. It took me about an hour to figure it out so you are way smarter than I am.

I hope it gives you many hours of shooting pleasure.
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Old 02-23-2012, 01:09 PM
j.r. guerra in s. texas

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Very nice rifle sir - good shooting!

. . . magnum air rifles are definitely not for sissys! It isn't so much you are out of breath, but (I get) some muscle tremors after several shots when I shoot right after I cock the barrel.

My technique for break barrels (do not own side cocking rifle like the above) is brace top of butt against right hand pocket (right hand), left side of rifle facing me. Reaching around rifle, I can pull the barrel down from there (towards my belt buckle).



I hear you on springer rifle weights. My heaviest air rifle is RWS 350 Magnum .22 - about 9 pounds scoped and a tad over 48" long - heavier and longer than my Garand, which is no flyweight. My other heavies in include RWS 45 and Webley Tomahawk (both .177s).

BB gun - I think NOT!
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Old 02-23-2012, 07:36 PM
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That's Why I Also Own a Diana 240 Schütze

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Pearson View Post
I think you'd get more enjoyment from shooting the more economical and (equally) accurate .177.
Lighter guns can be made for this caliber without sacrificing any shooting comfort. --- Mike
My Diana 240 Schütze ... Tuned by John in PA ... aom22
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Old 02-23-2012, 08:15 PM
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Try-Out Technique on BSA Lightning XL

Quote:
Originally Posted by j.r. guerra in s. texas View Post
My technique for break barrels (do not own side cocking rifle like the above)
is brace top of butt against right hand pocket (right hand),
left side of rifle facing me. Reaching around rifle,
I can pull the barrel down from there (towards my belt buckle).
I'll try-out your technique on my .22 caliber, gas strut. BSA Lighting XL.
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you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735
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Old 08-25-2012, 12:43 PM
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Check Zero ... Re-Zero

It's been sometime since I checked zero on my M48.
But, it seemed about time.
As my wife spotted some unwanted trespassers in our backyard - time to prepare the M48 for action.

As it happens, I've been shooting my Schütze and BSA XL Lightnings with great regularity.
I wished I could say the same for my M48.
But, like a hi-powered rifle, the M48 is only uncased ... when there's serious work to do.
So, time to check zero.

Since the last time I shot the M48, I've adjusted/changed my shooting technique and rifle hold - somewhat.
And, it showed as I started printing some groups.
Shooting Distance at 12.3 yards.
Why 12.3yds? This is the range indicated POI for the 2nd-dot of the MAP6 reticle.
For reticle to be zeroed at 25 yards.


NOTE: Red-X'd or Red slashed holes are .177 pellet impacts
I was not sufficiently motivated to set-up a new target
In hindsight ... I should have
My plan was to shoot 5-shot groups until the M48 was zeroed.
Group 1, circled in red, are 8-shots that were way-off mark.
The rifle was dieseling badly ... the first 2-shots extreme hits to the right just inside the red meandering
circumference were the result.
As the dieseling began to subside, I continued shooting until some semblance of clustering began to form-up.

Group 2, marked in violet, was still dieseling, but, much less so.
The stringing was evident because I was trying to settle on a more comfortable hold.
The M48 is a heavy rifle ... it pays to find a comfortable hold for slower shooting.
At this time, I decided to make some scope adjustments.

Group 3, delineated in pink, the dieseling had subsided significantly - no more obvious smoke.
But, as I opened the breech I could detect the faint scent of dieseled smoke.
I made another set of scope adjustments.

Group 4, denoted in aqua, was the result of a more deliberated effort on my part.
I didn't shot fast ... I certainly didn't go very slowly ... about ten to 15 seconds per shot.
I performed another fine scope adjustment and settled-down for another 5-shot string.

Group 5, noted by highlighter, was not a 5-shot group.
It is two pellets stacked one on top of the other - or, nearly so.
These last 2-shots were enough for me to be assured my scope was properly zeroed.
I decided to leave well-enough alone ... recover the target and post my doings.
__________________
W. Edwards Deming ... Quality: It is not enough to do-your-best;
you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735

Last edited by aom22; 12-02-2013 at 03:59 PM.
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