Ural Overhaul IX - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > >

Notices

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-03-2010, 11:16 AM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Ural Overhaul IX



Log in to see fewer ads
Installing sling swivel studs. Short cuts will make even an easy job a nightmare. Follow logical steps and avoid figuring out how to cover the mistake later.

Level the stock.

Find the width of the stock. Divide by 2.

Mark ctr. of stock. Since this is flat, rather easy. Just push the caliper point into the wood and leave a mark. In cases with severe cast off or on, the placement may be off center somewhat to accommodate for the the stock not being straight. Your choice. I like slight off center, toward the true center line. The front swivel must be centered.

Ensure the screw will not penetrate anything. Do a visual.

Measure the screw diameters at the body and the un-threaded shank. Many a stock has been chipped because this step was neglected. The shank will behave like a wedge and break the wood around the hole entrance. The harder the wood, the more probability of occurrence. Better to have more relief than not enough.


I use a hand drill. Fast = bad, and hand drills will usually allow more control. Drill smaller hole then relief hole. Watch depth. Easier to drill deeper than intended. Everyone does it sometime or other unless you measure the depth of the hole ....assume only when prepared to plug an unintended hole.


( Notice the cleaner working area. )

More to come,

ret

Last edited by RET; 04-03-2010 at 11:35 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-06-2010, 06:08 AM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Old Theads

--------------------------------------------------------
Prior posts

Ural Overhaul I
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=261580

Ural Overhaul II
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=267755

Ural Overhaul III
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=268572

Ural Overhaul IV
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=269262

Ural Overhaul V
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=270753

Ural Overhaul VI
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=272101

Ural Overhaul VII
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=277423

Ural Overhaul VIII
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=309937

Ural Overhaul IX
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=334933

Ural Overhaul X
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=349679

Last edited by RET; 07-29-2010 at 07:47 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-06-2010, 03:54 PM
aom22's Avatar
aom22
US Air Force Disabled American Veteran Law Enforcement Officer NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Moderator
Join Date: 
Sep 2004
Location: 
Fort Stockton, TX
Posts: 
4,680
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
STICKLY Links

RET ... I've STICKY'ed all of your threads.

__________________
W. Edwards Deming ... Quality: It is not enough to do-your-best;
you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 04-10-2010, 09:49 PM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Finalizing stippled edges

Unlikely implements of gun work. A table top, a book and pencil. Sling swivel stud installed. Optional crying napkin in upper LH corner.


The book is for raising or lowering the pencil to correct height to scribe the final stipple line. Open the book a certain # of pages and add or remove pages to adjust height. I prefer books about philosophy or art, although political books work great and may be shot at when finished. Hold the stock to the table and move book and pencil as a unit.


Final line on LH side. This side has the cutout for the rear site, so the line may not appear to be the correct height in relationship to the top of the stock.


Final RH side.


Examine by looking lengthwise at the line to ensure straightness. Notice I skipped the finger groove. I do not like any roughness against the side of my trigger finger. Also notice the coarse and finer stipple patterns on the front forearm and further back on stock.



Grip area showing the repaired stock splits and various plugs. Finalize the curved stippled edges. Undulation in surface makes the line appear not to flow well, but it actually does.


Do not stipple to the edge of fine or thin surfaces. Just short of the edge. Notice the white paint on the edges. It is difficult to tell where the lines are w/o paint/wood contrast.


Use a fine burr to stipple into the corners. Go as far as you can w/o going over border. Lines are never totally straight, even on factory guns. Notice I have a single straggler almost touching the line.



Final 4 images to compare how a stipple job should generally look, unless there is a reason otherwise. Next image of RH side shows flowing stock lines and blending of dissimilar surfaces. Notice 3 distinct stipple types: grip area, slight angle in window and severe angled window surface. Slight angle has fine stippling, severe has medium and grip is coarse. Look closely at the severe angled area. This shows a common mistake in amateur stipple work. . Can you see the problem? Also, pencil line border flows better from this angle.


Closeup for better inspection. >>>>>>>>>> Problem is that the stipples do not overlap. Unless there is a reason to NOT overlap, this area should be stippled again. The utility of stippling is diminished because the surface in not rough. It may have aesthetic purposes, but it generally is just amateur work. That being said, I am going to claim the aesthetic work reason and leave as is. I want this surface to be flat, and utilitarian stippling never is. Finally, this is not a gripping surface.



Final two images for comparison. These are how stippling should generally appear. I may or may not correct the "problem" in the prior images. Leaning toward "no" for now.


I like to go over an area 2 times. First time just to knock out a large piece of work. Second time is where the stipples overlap and edges appear. A problem with amateur work is that the work is not stippled enough, as my example, OR one tries to do to much at once. When this happens the surface will have large dips where to much material is removed, and then the individual holes lose the edges. Patches of semi rough areas appear with no distinct edges. Easy to fix, but overall stock thickness is reduced. Just avoid the problem with 2 passes not one. Rushing is for amateurs. ( Amateur means low quality of work.) Also, all at once jobs generally will have an unintended pattern. Second pass jobs allows one to see any patterns and correct.



More to come,

ret

Last edited by RET; 04-14-2010 at 06:08 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-04-2010, 05:34 PM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Inching closer........

Well now where was I......
I used to sand and wet to whisker the wood, up to a 320 or 400 grit. No longer. I now sand to a 220 and spray with a urethane finish. It penetrates the wood, whiskers it also. I then sand to 320 with a fixed surface.
These images show sprayed but not sanded. After this, I'll fill the pores of the oak. Did I mention oak was a poor choice? Filler may be applied prior or after the surface fixer. No advantage I've seen either way.

( Save the hand rubbed oil finish unless you just like it more. This is easier to apply and tougher. I like oil, but do not like the time investment. No obvious result that I'll trade time for.)





All wood work finished. Finishing surface work now. Journey began here:



Original idea here.



Here are computer mock ups: I went with #1.









It came out similar to original ideas, but not a match. Some ideas were not workable, some did not look good, some became unappealing. Anyway,, wood work in finished, and rifle has a purposeful future in silhouette.

Not much more to come,

ret

Last edited by RET; 05-05-2010 at 12:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-05-2010, 12:12 PM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Fill large pores in wood

This is how large pores appear, and why oak in not the best choice for gun stocks. Unless the wood is painted, the pores appear as parallel lines in the wood grain, with the filler color showing. Little upside, but more work. Just say no. ( Or use and endure the extra work.)



Not much more to come,

ret
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-31-2010, 07:48 AM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Select the area to apply wood filler. I do not know any bad brands...they all seem to work equally well. Filler is a combination of glue and a stable non shrinking component, like saw dust.


Apply generously. I drew a fun design to take my mind off of the fact the fact that this project is about 1 year overdue. Just was not in smiley face mood today.


Press into the pores. I use a plastic spatula generally, but used a match book cover today. Do not press into stippling.


Wipe / scrape off...do not scrub off. Use the scrape method to avoid lifting out of pores. Scraper presses filler into pores and removes excess. Remove everything possible w/ scraper, especially in corners.


Filler area will be lightly sanded, so do not make additional work for yourself by leaving more filler than necessary and taking a chance on altering dimensions during sanding.


Use (old) tooth brush to remove from unwanted areas.
(Side note to do-it-yourselfers: Use of current brush has good and bad consequences.
Good: Great do-it-yourself cavity filler, inexpensive, and will allow anyone to take an all expense paid vacation to the the state mental facility.
Bad: terrible breath, and after taste.

Warning Tooth color match may not be exact.)
This may be good or bad, depending on your situation.


Full discussion with spouse is advised!

Last edited by RET; 06-01-2010 at 10:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-31-2010, 10:35 AM
calixt0
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
May 2009
Location: 
Tuttle, OK
Posts: 
247
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
I can't wait to see this project finished. you do excellent work.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-07-2010, 09:39 AM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Major plateau- painting the stock

First coat to cover. Several base coat applications. Careful to not miss any of the stipple craters. Must paint from all angles. Inspect in full sun from various every angles. This will be a digital camo pattern. Paint from lightest to darkest color.

Installing extended bolt handle this week. Continuation of posting from 4-21-09. ( Overhaul VII, posting #2, 09:53 cst )





Not much more to come,

ret

Last edited by RET; 06-07-2010 at 10:23 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-16-2010, 01:20 PM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Tape off the stippled areas

I use regular masking tape over stippled areas because it has more adhesion. Since this tape will be on for several coats of paint, letting go is not an option. Press the tape into the stipples for tight fit. ( Crocks are my favorite work shoe, as shown here.)

Cut and remove overhang tape w/ a razor knife. (not shown )



Notice images # 2,3 do not have tape straight along length of forearm. I will re-apply. It is the small things that make a project worth doing.







-----------------
Extension is epoxied to bolt handle.

Assemble barreled action into stock with screws. Slide extension onto bolt handle. Check clearance on stock prior to epoxy being applied..no rubbing anywhere. Disassemble. Fill extension w/ epoxy and ensure voids are filled...no air pockets. Push extension fully onto bolt handle ( a tight fit is best. ) Suspend bolt horizontally between objects. (I use a vise. ) Close vise onto bolt handle when extension is perpendicular to floor from all directions. Top off the epoxy until void is filled and remainder forms a nice concave surface between the bolt handle and extension top. Remove any excess epoxy prior to hardening.



Not much more to come,

ret

Last edited by RET; 06-18-2010 at 09:11 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-18-2010, 08:56 AM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Barreled action w/ bolt

in stock to check for clearances. Bolt may not touch anything. Take care when lifting any barreled action from wood as to not split stock in back of the bolt. Best to always remove bolt to install and remove bbl. action.



Not much more to come,

ret
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-21-2010, 08:13 PM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Trim the edges..

With a razor knife. Only cut through the tape. Lay razor on it's side against the wood and use as a guide to cut straight lines. On this, the stipples are going to remain the lightest paint color. (Unless I change it.)



I used the same yellow cap for a cutting guide in cutting the tape as in the first time in stipple layout stage. (VIII 12-12-09)







On digital camo, lightest color to be seen is the first coat. There are percents for each color if one is going to exact. I am going for a look, not a reproduction.

Not much more to come,

ret
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-17-2010, 02:49 PM
RET
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2008
Posts: 
497
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Continued on Ural Overhaul X

Continued on Ural Overhaul X

ret
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:35 AM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x