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  #1  
Old 11-30-2009, 07:30 PM
RET
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Ural Overhaul VIII



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Sorry about this taking so long. I hope to finish on this thread.


This shows the wrist pins to strengthen stock.


Carefully sand any areas to remove dips or humps. Establish borders to tape for stippling and or painting.


Draw freely on the stock as needed to think about your finished product. You'll be amazed at what a few non traditional sketches will do.





This stock balances close to where is should......on the front action screw.

More to come,

ret

Last edited by RET; 04-06-2010 at 06:05 AM.
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  #2  
Old 12-02-2009, 10:21 PM
RET
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Decide what diamond burrs to use.

Buy diamond burrs for use in dremel type tool. Cut pattern in wood to get a feel for how the tool cuts and feels. Use the SIDE of the tool, not the point. Use of the tip instead of the side will generally burn the wood, not cut the wood. Diamond instead of carbide, because the surface will be "sanded" instead of cut. Leaves a smoother surface.

Look at several burrs, and decide which pattern you like best. Push finger tips against the patterns to decide how it feels. Use several types if you like the looks and feel. Alter directions to change the pattern.

More to come,

ret



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  #3  
Old 12-05-2009, 09:31 PM
RET
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Sketch your thoughts on the stock.

Wait a day or two and see if you like it...if not, try again. The waiting is the important part. Do not leave out any portion. Sometimes things look fine separated, but bad together. Any uncompleted areas should be addressed, such as an area that is not completely shaped or final edges established. Pencil in the final lines. If I still like this tomorrow, I'll tape off the area to stipple. Don't forget to blunt the sharp edges/ corners as mentioned earlier. Fill in wood pores / final sand any that will not be stippled..prior to stippling. Rough sanding (120 grit) in all that is needed for stippled areas, because your work will be removed by the diamond burr.

These pics show all of the attachments, plugs, and experiments I did. Rather ugly at the moment. I keep being asked about the "window" in the buttstock. The only answer is................ I thought I'd like it, and I did.

More to come,

ret





























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  #4  
Old 12-06-2009, 09:56 PM
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Beginning stipple.

Stippling is easy, inexpensive and practical. Need a dremel type tool and a few diamond burrs, perhaps only 1 burr. Experiment on a piece of wood similar to the subject. Different woods stipple differently, and cut / burn at different rates. I try to stipple everything with the barreled action attached. Avoid holding the subject and applying the burr.....at some point you WILL have a problem, such as the burr grabs the wood, and cut to deep, or cuts a groove. I hold the dremel with 2 hands, and cut with the side burr edge, holding the dremel horizontally. I move the subject in the vice to be able to access the subject and maintain my grasp of the dremel tool. Plunge cutting with the tip will ensure burning and not cutting.

Since there is no best way to do this, I'll talk about my favorite way of forming patterns that disappear into a larger work with no distinct pattern.

I like to cut about 8 - 10 deep holes in some pattern, square, round, any pattern.
Then I "fill in" cutting less deep holes around these 10 holes.
I like to vary the depth.
I also like to leave "specks" of the original surface intact. This allows the original shape to be maintained to some degree.
I like to begin in the center and work toward the edges. This allows me to change my pattern if I can see a problem on the edge or change my mind about where to stop.
Keep a brush handy to remove saw dust from the indentures.
Cut from different directions if possible because a pattern will emerge showing the angle or tool direction you applied.
Watch out for hard spots in the grain...the burr tends to grab a little.


The work moves quickly, so do not forget the pattern/edges and cut into areas you should have avoided. If you do this, you'd better like the new pattern........' cause it's your now!

Go back over areas to fill in, but you will lose depth when cutting the tops off of areas you missed the first time. Experiment first and try this one. This makes a BIG difference in outcomes.








More to come,

ret
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  #5  
Old 12-08-2009, 10:48 PM
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Carbide and diamond burrs compared

LH burr is diamond, RH is carbide. Both torque to some degree, as you may see from the oblong cut. Carbide burns much more easily.


Notice the burn on RH side.

Notice the shadow from the uncut wood on each, LH side. Carbide leaves more uncut.

Carbide set cost $50 in 1976, Diamond set cost $6.00 last week.

LH side of stock, larger burr used on forearm, smaller in indented area.

Rh side. Glue lines disappear.


This work is somewhat boring to perform, so do not let your mind wander...leads to staying into areas of the stock you wanted to leave uncut. I only work for 1/2 hour and stop. Do a little each night until finished

More to come,

ret
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  #6  
Old 12-10-2009, 08:35 AM
RET
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Apply duct tape

and to establish a straight line. Look at the tape to ensure it is straight. Hold against the wood with a finger and pull tight then apply to wood. Smooth out bubbles then look again where it must be straightened. Tape is a good method to ensure identical distances between edges where stippling begins.



I finalized the edges of stippling. The edges did not seem to really "flow" with the overall work. After a few stretches, it emerged last night.

I am never sorry I put personal work down and waited a day of so between decisions...like the final shapes or borders. This can be seen in the many changes in the work from how I thought I wanted it...to how I actually wanted it. I think working fast has benefits, but leaving some decisions unmade has benefits also. If I still like my new borders, after stippling the center of the work.....I'll keep it. In other words, I need to like decisions a few days AFTER they seemed like good ones.

This only works for DIYS projects. Never make decisions for customers...ever.





More to come,

ret

Last edited by RET; 12-10-2009 at 02:10 PM.
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  #7  
Old 12-11-2009, 10:47 AM
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I just noticed a problem from a photo....

Look at photo # 1 on the last series. The "window" in the stock is not even across the top, the angle of the tape is not parallel with the comb. Until I applied the tape, and saw in a photo, it escaped my notice.

This stock presented special considerations. The stock has two units with different characteristics. In relationship to this situation, the the stock itself and the cheek piece. The stock tapers from the grip to the butt plate. The cheek piece thickness is constant.

This creates a taper at the conjunction of the two. No problem until the window enters the situation. To maintain appearances, the inside surfaces of the interior are not square with each other..they angle to meet the outside edges. Look at photos 18,19,20, counting backward from the last image posted, especially 18 & 20.

You can see through the window and see both sides at once. Openings are mostly square with each other but interior is not .. nor can the be if windows are to "appear" correctly on the surface. ( I cut the window on image #2, Overhaul series VII. You can see the problem there of not being parallel. I missed seeing it! I chiseled the opening by eye, and did not lay it out with a straightedge. Now I must lay out the window edge, and blend the interior surfaces and not change the edge on the bottom of the cheek piece.

It does not need anything better than a filed finish at this point because
: it does not show, because the diamond burr creates a new surface and stippling is a great way to create optical illusion. All apply: pick one according to your goals.

Color contrasts, shadows and straight lines are helpful in finding flaws. I'll need to work on this situation prior to continuing.

Is this TMI??

More to come,

ret
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  #8  
Old 12-12-2009, 06:05 PM
RET
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A little more finished.

Looks like my border was off quite a bit. Notice the black line and the tape edge.... Not good. I did this once, but somehow lost my way. Yep, there is is on 4-10-09, 3rd down..... Measure from the top of comb again and this time I'll actually do what I am suppose to do...rasp to the line.



Blend to match. Since I do not want to remove any wood from the window (port) front and bottom, but total removal tapering from the top back to zero on the bottom and zero across the entire bottom, I'll need to blend the two. A good estimate of how is to imagine a 45 degree angle from front top to back bottom. Blend only in the back triangle. Notice the bare wood triangular area where paint was removed.



Use light to roughly make stippled even in depth. Remember wood has hard and soft spots. About the time you think you have an even downward cutting pressure, you'll hit a soft spot a cut deeper than you want to. Find a middle ground and apply more pressure to hard areas. Since this has 4 types of material to stipple..original wood, replacement wood, dowel pins, and epoxy, watch for each as they arise.



Go slow on this dished area/ forearm / transition. With incorrect pressure, or the burr grabbing the work, it is easy to let the burr "climb" over the dished edge onto the forearm. Do not climb feed the work. ..in other words... feed the wood into the burr so it pushes away from the area to avoid, and not trying to climb over the edge onto the forearm. In general, climb feeding any work is bad, and at some point will be regretted. Notice the edge is intact. Climb feeding will destroy the edge. Do not underestimate how fast burrs get out of control at 35K rpm head speed. ( Side note wood is easily repairable, metal a different story...always avoid climb feeding metal...always.)



If you have the eye for it, sketch an edge to see if you like the outcome.


If you like it, erase and find a matching sized object and place on the wood and trace on the wood..this will be concentric.



Remove and see if is what you want.



These images are blurred, but good enough for this. Think about exactly how you want "soft" transition areas to be addressed. Soft transitions are areas where there may be nothing except the edge you make, to separate different types of surface adornment, ( checkering, stippling, etc.). Hard transitions are areas with a severe angle, like the cheek piece on this stock. For the most part, I have avoided the soft transition areas on this stock.







More to come,

ret
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  #9  
Old 12-17-2009, 10:06 PM
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Mostly finished now......

with the stippling anyway. Only edges remaining. All major areas completed.

Aluminum does not like diamond burrs......it will clog the head just like mud in a tire, rendering the burr useless, w/o more work than it is worth to remove.....so just stay away. Use carbide burr or ball peen hammer. I used the burr.



Looks like a hog works here... but, the daytime shop is clean. I really dislike cleaning this bench for some unknown illogical reason. I'll clean it for the final image shoot. Sorry for the eyeball abuse!




More to come,

ret
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  #10  
Old 01-16-2010, 10:48 PM
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A Little Closer

HERE we go again.

Measure from the top of the stock to create a border.


Measure 90 degrees from the side to ensure the area to be stippled is even on both sides. Then, trace the other side.


Use a pen that does not leak if possible. This one exploded, but since it will be painted, it's ok. If it was not to be painted, this would be a major disaster, but I would have used a pencil to avoid the potential problem. The colored patch at the end of the forearm is from uneven wood hardness.


Extend the arch to the top of the stock with a round object the size needed. This shows up in image 1 better than here. Notice the line across the top of the top referred to earlier.


Stipple close to the edge, but do not stipple a row against the border. As a general rule, do not stipple a border. This will show on the finished work. Fill in as you go. Vary the space between the holes. There are two stipple types here, large and medium. The color change in the stippled surface reflects a change in hardness of the wood. Note the unstippled "strip" across the forearm top ...just for fun. Make your stock interesting.





Finalize any areas like this one for my trigger finger. I am filing this 90 degrees and removing the radius. No functionality, just appearance.



Rubber bands make great erasers when used like a shoe buffing cloth.




Notice the grip area, especially the area where in index finger and palm meet. Two wood surfaces meet here with different finishes...stipple and smooth. The lines are also curved. Do not stipple to close to the edge...leave a slight "buffer" area. Leave the edge sharp. Note different burrs make different surfaces, as shown here.



More to come,

ret
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  #11  
Old 03-23-2010, 09:51 PM
RET
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Put a little time in the URAL

tonight. Discovered I made a mistake by assuming the duct tape was newer than it was. End result was much adhesive remained on the stock. I scraped most off with a razor blade. Lesson: Use new tape. No photos, not much to see in scraping off "gunk."

I am running for city counselor against the mayor. I cannot eat any more BS, and decided to run even though victory chances are slim.

Back to the URAL after 4-6-10.

More to come, but not much more,

ret

Last edited by RET; 03-24-2010 at 07:16 AM.
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  #12  
Old 03-28-2010, 10:23 PM
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some quick images

This is the trigger finger relief groove. My finger rubbed against it prior to the trim. Work with a flat file to create the radius. File short of the edge of the trigger guard inletted area. Final sanding will reduce the last amount. I like to use a fine cut flexible file. The actual file is from an auto points set. ( as in points and spark plugs set from the early 1970's) Stiff files do not work as well in this application. The surface of the wood seems to darken when properly filed because the wood is slightly burnished. Sanding will lighted the color somewhat.



The quality of a stock job is generally revealed by examining the area behind the grip cap. Look for uneven work, incomplete sanding or finishing. If detail is not seen here, you can count on shortcuts elsewhere.



More to come,

ret
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