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  #1  
Old 03-05-2009, 10:02 AM
RET
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Ural Overhaul IV



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First Riser glued in.

No comments necessary except...... looks terrible. This will change very soon.








One more riser to go.

More to come.

ret
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  #2  
Old 03-05-2009, 10:54 AM
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Labor Intensive

Quote:
Originally Posted by RET View Post
... No comments necessary except.... looks terrible. This will change very soon....
Actully RET ... it looks like alot work.
__________________
W. Edwards Deming ... Quality: It is not enough to do-your-best;
you must know what-to-do, and ... then ... do-your-best.
Ever-Onward ... Through the Fog ---- Fort Stockton TX 79735
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  #3  
Old 03-06-2009, 11:35 AM
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Determining final outcomes

This is where one must make final decisions and make allowances for only slight changes from here on.

These are my considerations in no particular order:

Appearance,
Cast off,
Toe in/out,
Butt stock cant,
and a bore line where all measurements are taken from, ........thinking about how to balance these factors becomes important.

Here is what I have decided to do to achieve those considerations:

Have maximum allowed comb elevation to fit my frame/neck/head.
Only have enough rollover / cheek piece height to place my eye behind the sights.
Since rules allow only .5 rollover, AND the stock has cast off, some of the allowable rollover is negated. This is a somewhat complicated situation.
Minimize weight.
Look good. ( to me anyway! )

I'll attempt to balance the things I am unwilling to change with the things I can change. These measurements help me keep on track.

--------------------------------------

Draw line around butt plate and sand just shy of the line. Use a belt sander if possible to maintain 90 degrees, then set aside. I have decided to remove all toe in, and mount this fixture at 90 degrees to bore, and cut the stock .5 short of my normal rifles. If I maintain normal toe in ( 3/8" in at the toe ) the maximum measurement to the butt plate toe is 7" below bore line requirements may be broken if I need to use a lengthening spacer, which would lower the butt plate below the requirement. ( because of the angle ) A slightly shorter stock, helps me hold the rifle steadier in silhouette competition stance. ( elbow resting on side ) I can add a spacer as needed w/o causing a problem. Also, added clothing can cause a problem with length. This allows lengthening and shortening as needed.



The dark line is the center of the butt stock allowing for cast off. The pencil line is the limit of the area to be removed for lightening weight. A final riser will cover this area.



These are the boundaries for the rasping.



The butt shows the balancing act. The pencil line shows cant, the darker pen line shows center of the butt at 90 degrees from bore line. the angle between is the amount of cant to be dealt with on this project.



Next I'll determine how to balance these two situation and then lay this out.

Toe in is now accounted for. More to come.

ret
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  #4  
Old 03-06-2009, 04:10 PM
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Putting rasp to wood.

COMMENTS:

Chalk line is the bore line.
Black line is the original stock line at the crown.
Pencil line is the depth of weight reduction line.
Red line is the maximum the rollover cheek piece can stray from the bore line.



Intended area for weight loss.



#49 rasp and the victim.



Mount the work so that the intended maximum depth line is below the vice jaw. This assures one stopping prior to rasping the wrong area or depth. This is mostly for the mass removal phase, may be employed anytime.



Russian Beech meets American Oak.



Rasp line is below the jaw for mass rasping. This technique is time consuming, but will save your bacon more times than not. It also forces one to keep the rasp strokes parallel to the vice top, or you will rasp the vice, and dull an expensive rasp.



Last bit of original finish turning to sawdust.




Keep your work flat by lining up known surfaces with your work, in this case the routed area. Notice the red arrows.......just reminders of the lines.



Work slow, think about each step.



I'll cut this with a saw, instead of the of the rasp. Use machines if you have them, but not having a machine will many time finish in a better job. Machines take it off fast, and get you into trouble fast. Rasps are slow, but more necessary for a custom fit to you.




Know what you want prior to doing anything. One more riser to be epoxied here.



This is one reason to leave extra material on the stock. The surfaces WILL suffer damage when mass rasping is the goal. The belly will have a final trim later.



The butt length is about to endure an extreme makeover as a result of an encounter with a saw blade. I'll cut the bulk of the cheek piece away.



More to come.

ret
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  #5  
Old 03-06-2009, 08:04 PM
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Looks like it will be a nice Silhouette rifle. I`m guessing standard class since it has a non-tapered barrel. I`ll be pretty much the same thing to a Biathlon Basic in the next few months. Always nice to show up at the Silhouette comps with something besides a CZ or Anschutz.

Are you planning on using a scope or sticking to peep sights?

Last edited by Chattcatdaddy; 03-06-2009 at 08:17 PM.
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  #6  
Old 03-06-2009, 08:18 PM
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I'll probably never be able to do this, but I'm still enjoying watching you. If you made a video you could probably get on The Outdoor Channel. I'd sure watch.
RT
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  #7  
Old 03-07-2009, 09:04 PM
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Lefty hand side of butt stock shaping up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chattcatdaddy View Post
Looks like it will be a nice Silhouette rifle. I`m guessing standard class since it has a non-tapered barrel. I`ll be pretty much the same thing to a Biathlon Basic in the next few months. Always nice to show up at the Silhouette comps with something besides a CZ or Anschutz.

I have used a CZ, very nice but not in the league with the URAL I am modifying.

Are you planning on using a scope or sticking to peep sights?
Scope.
----------------------------------------

Time to think about how the LH side will end up. Perhaps totally functional.....(or not).




Stroke a few times and check lines.



Bottom side has more to rasp than the comb side. Try as I may, I cannot rasp long without putting to much angle on the rasp. Checking often cannot be overdone.




Mark low spots and rasp around that spot until even.


Hold away from your face and use shadows to look for problem areas as you create them (everybody does).



Redraw as you change your mind.



Almost all stock work can be accomplished with these three tools.



Do not thinks all sorts of special tools are needed. For every minute you rasp, spend a minute thinking about that you want to do next and are doing now.

Amateurs round corners. Push rasp into the work to create crisp edges. Notice the rounded area is shiney. This is what you are looking to see.
Rasp chatter (where the rasp skips over hard grain, usually using the the round rasp) creates ripples. Reverse the rasp and come from the opposite direction and vary pressure.



More to come.

ret
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  #8  
Old 03-09-2009, 10:20 PM
RET
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Epxoy is my friend.

Repairing the cracks.

Depending on the location and severity of the cracks, they can be repaired and restore the soundness of the stock.

The first step is the epoxy...mix it well. Sounds like it does not need to be said, but I have seen many times the epoxy was not mixed well. Use at least 30 minute epoxy, and spend the first few minutes mixing.

Clamp the stock in a vice with either jaw padding or my favorite.... is a large firm smooth surface that increases the jaw area...spreading the contact area.





Push with increasing pressure on the stock to determine the locations and lengths of the cracks. They will almost always be longer than they appear.
Do not break the stock off...or if you do, have some tubular rubber bands ready to reattach. Twine wrapped around and around a broken off stocks will repair it and the twine rasps off easily. ( Sometimes breaking if off makes for a better repair. )





Warm the wood with a heating lamp for about 10 minutes prior to mixing epoxy. Hot wood is my favorite. Mix more epoxy than you need and apply along the breaks in a string like fashion. Just enough to cover the crack. Any extra is wasted. The goal is to work the epoxy into the crack. With the stock firmly clamped, rock the butt stock back and forth. Work one side for about two minutes or about 50 times. Switch sides, do the same. You will notice the epoxy being pulled into areas of invisible cracks. Use a twisting motion after you are satisfied the rocking motion has pulled glue into it as far as possible. This reveals even more cracks.

Apply more epoxy when it is sucked into the crack. A spotlight lamp is useful in heating the wood. It is surprising how much more epoxy is sucked into warm wood vs. cold. When the crack is filled, the epoxy will suck down and squish back up during rocking motion. . DO NOT STOP UNTIL this happens.

When the epoxy begins to firm up, scrape if from problem or internal areas.
( The action or trigger guard areas.) Pay special attention to the tang and wrist.) If you do not work epoxy down into the wood, or it sets up to quickly, it will form a wall and prevent epoxy from penetrating deeply, thus blunting the repair. The heat lamp helps this, but the epoxy also sets up more quickly.

When the epoxy forms a skin surface, but not hard, push it into areas that need extra, or there is a broken out piece of wood. Clamp in the vice with the side down where you want the epoxy to run or pool. ( Low spots or broken out areas. Use gravity if you can!)

Let dry 24 hour regardless of instruction. A properly repaired stock will never crack along the repair again.



More to come.
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  #9  
Old 03-13-2009, 08:57 AM
RET
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New Thread link.

Ural Overhaul I
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=261580

Ural Overhaul II
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=267755

Ural Overhaul III
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=268572

Ural Overhaul IV
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=269262

Ural Overhaul V
https://rimfirecentral.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=270753

Ural Overhaul VI
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=272101

Ural Overhaul VII
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=277423

Ural Overhaul VIII
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...d.php?t=309937

Last edited by RET; 07-29-2010 at 07:38 PM.
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