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  #1  
Old 06-11-2021, 02:03 PM
mr alexander
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Takedown Screw Torque?



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Is there a recommended amount of torque that should be

used on the takedown screw when reassembling a 10/22?

I thought of asking here before contacting Ruger for some

advice on this. Your input is much appreciated. Thank you!
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  #2  
Old 06-11-2021, 02:08 PM
Eagle0199
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20 inch-pounds seems to be an accepted value but I don't know where it comes from. Seems to work well for me but I have one rifle that shoots more accurately at 25 in/lbs. It pays to experiment.
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Old 06-11-2021, 03:07 PM
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The official guidance from the tech tips on their web site says "hand tight"..
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Old 06-11-2021, 03:37 PM
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The action screw is steel and the receiver is aluminum -- so nicely snug, NOT really tight is best.

Doug
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Old 06-12-2021, 06:23 PM
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"Finger tight"..
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Old 06-12-2021, 07:32 PM
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Snug is good, and if the action is not in a pillared stock, the screw will loosen fairly quickly, since wood compresses when the screw is tightened. I have to re-snug my action screws often on the ones I have not pillared, the ones I did pillar stay tight. I did notice that the ones I have in laminate stocks stay tighter longer.
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Old 06-12-2021, 08:04 PM
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Start at 10 inch pounds, test group, increase by 1 i/p increments to maybe 16.
The soft alum fine threads in the 10/22 action have been known to strip out. Once you do that and have to fix it you WILL regret going to 20 or more.
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Old 06-13-2021, 01:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gcrank1 View Post
Start at 10 inch pounds, test group, increase by 1 i/p increments to maybe 16.
The soft alum fine threads in the 10/22 action have been known to strip out. Once you do that and have to fix it you WILL regret going to 20 or more.
So true. Based on the aluminum alloy they seem to use, 16-17 is a safe limit; going higher asks for trouble.
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  #9  
Old 06-13-2021, 02:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gcrank1 View Post
Start at 10 inch pounds, test group, increase by 1 i/p increments to maybe 16.
The soft alum fine threads in the 10/22 action have been known to strip out. Once you do that and have to fix it you WILL regret going to 20 or more.
^^^ THIS. Many 10-22s will actually show variance in accuracy with action screw torque. When I used to use OEM screws, I would start at 10 inch pounds and go up 1 pound in 1 pound increments, testing at 50 yards on a mechanical rest and rear bag with good ammo on a calm day. Most of mine seemed to shoot best somewhere between 16 and 18 inch pounds.

I posted a thread years ago on this topic. At the time, I contacted Ruger and all of the aftermarket receiver manufacturers to get their recommended torque specs and posted them in that thread. IIRC, the general consensus back then was 15–20 inch pounds. Here’s a link to that thread from 2013:



https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...ghlight=Torque



I started using 1/4 - 20 takedown screws and Kidd rear tangs On all of my custom 1022 builds going back at least 10 years ago. Here’s a copied post discussing the why and the how of it, if anyone is interested in the minutiae-

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrGunner
About 15 years ago my brother stripped out the 12-24 takedown screw on one of my Ruger receivers, fortunately all he did was cross thread the screw and boogered up the outer two or three threads. I fixed it by retapping the hole to 1/4-20.
I figured rather than using helicoil, I decided to simply upsize to a bigger fastener. It created such a solid and stable connection that I have done it to every 10-22 clone rifle I have owned and built since. Several reasons – but the most important is the simplest. I never did like that "Butt Pucker" feel I would get when I went to final snug the action screw and worry if it's going to strip out. When I pillar bed any rifle, I like a nice solid pillar that will remove all of the compressive forces from the fastener to the stock material. It is my preference to be able to snug them as tight as I wish, and not even worry about torque values. I free-float many of my barrels, even my center fires, and then if necessary, I tune with pressure pads until I'm satisfied.
Describing the tuning process with pressure pads would require another long winded detailed post, which I won’t get into here. Suffice it to say that when I find the right location and surface area for the pressure pad, I sometimes replace the pad with bedding in the barrel channel.
Then there's the availability of fasteners – when you start pillar bedding stocks and adding lower escutcheons that are non-Ruger OEM, you run into a rather high variance of length of screws with different stock styles. Availability of the 12 – 24 screw is virtually nonexistent – there's no variety at all. The 1/4– 20, however, are available in many lengths, with many driver choices, available at any home improvement center. You can also order them online with chrome heads. I prefer to use the round button style head with Allen screw, the socket is 5/32 – ironically the same as the Vblock screws.

I DO NOT drill the TD hole. Take a 1/4-20 4 flute tap – always use a new, sharp one. Preferably a tap that tapers to a good point. Lock the receiver in a vice, and level it in two planes.

Verify repeatedly that the tap is running straight into vertical. I go one quarter turn in, one quarter turn back, blow out the chips with compressed air, then spray with machine oil or Remoil. Quarter turn in, quarter turnback, blowout chips with compressed air, oil. Resist the urge to go more than one quarter turn at a time through the entire process. I have done many, never had a problem. If you drill, you will remove material and the threads you create will not have nice sharp points.
This must be done with the barrel removed so that you can run the tap all the way through the TD hole. If you cannot remove the barrel, such as with an old Kidd Supergrade with barrel threaded in, you start the tapping process with a tapered tap and then finish with an end cutting blind hole tap.



Once you shoot a 10 – 22 that has a solid front pillar and either a VQ lower escutcheon or custom-made like the ones in the threads I will link you to below, you will be absolutely amazed at how solid they feel. I'm not exaggerating – it feels like a different gun. The rigidity of the platform with pillar bedded stock and Kidd rear tang, with a free floated barrel literally hums like a tuning fork in your hands when the bolts slams home.
And then, of course there is the reliable repeatability and accuracy of the build. I tear mine down with impunity after each range outing, I have quick release rings on all my scopes and tear them off after each session too.
I have absolutely no doubt in my mind that when I reassemble my rifles using the methods in the stickies that I will link you to, the action returns to exactly the same position that it was in the stock before, and the performance of the rifle does not vary.

Rear Tang and Pillar bedding links

Installing Kidd rear tang on Ruger receiver, by Azguy:

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...d.php?t=465635

Rear tang and pillar bedding:

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...d.php?t=489351

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...d.php?t=477781


Regards,


DrGunner
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Last edited by DrGunner; 06-13-2021 at 03:37 AM.
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Old 06-13-2021, 06:17 AM
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The objective is to secure the receiver in the stock so there is no movement . Movement is the first enemy of accuracy. But the second enemy of accuracy is too much torque. If over torqued the action will just not run consistently as it struggles to get free.

I find that aluminum tape bedding the receiver/ trigger group at the high points secures the receiver from lateral movement .

And I always put a pressure pad under the barrel inthe front where it first encounters the stock. This expands the fulcrum of the teeter totter created by the single screw set up.
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Old 06-13-2021, 09:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toomany22s View Post
The objective is to secure the receiver in the stock so there is no movement . Movement is the first enemy of accuracy. But the second enemy of accuracy is too much torque. If over torqued the action will just not run consistently as it struggles to get free.

I find that aluminum tape bedding the receiver/ trigger group at the high points secures the receiver from lateral movement .

And I always put a pressure pad under the barrel inthe front where it first encounters the stock. This expands the fulcrum of the teeter totter created by the single screw set up.
Did the same with mine. Tape bed, pressure pad and 12in/lbs on the takedown screw. Definitely tightened up the groups.
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  #12  
Old 06-24-2021, 02:24 PM
mr alexander
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Takedown Screw Torque?

Thank you all for the replies. I failed to mention that my 10/22 has never

been modified in any way; it's still all factory Ruger. Ten inch-pounds of

torque seems to be a safe level. Low strength threadlocking compounds

are available from LOCTITE and Permatex. Are there be any downsides to

applying some on the takedown screw prior to reassembly? Or is this a bit

of overkill when considering that 10 inch-pounds of torque is also going to

be used on the screw?

Last edited by mr alexander; 06-26-2021 at 01:14 PM. Reason: Added a question
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Old 06-24-2021, 03:19 PM
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Has yours ever come loose?
Considering that you must periodically 'take it down' then using a thread locker for something that doesnt typically come loose is overkill (or a solution for a non-existent problem).
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Old 06-24-2021, 03:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mr alexander View Post
Thank you all for the replies. I failed to mention that my 10/22 has never

been modified in any way; it's still all factory Ruger. Ten inch-pounds of

torque seems to be a safe level. Low strength threadlocking compounds

are available from Loc-Tite and Permatex. Are there be any downsides to

applying some on the takedown screw prior to reassembly? Or is this a bit

of overkill when considering that 10 inch-pounds of torque is also going to

be used on the screw?
No downside if you use a product that releases easily.

Iíve taken to using LocTite blue paste for TD screws and scope rings. Applies easy & clean, keeps well on the shelf, dries to provide good hold without a hard to crack bond-

https://www.amazon.com/Loctite-50616.../dp/B0053ZNMDE

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Old 06-24-2021, 03:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gcrank1 View Post
Has yours ever come loose?
Considering that you must periodically 'take it down' then using a thread locker for something that doesnt typically come loose is overkill (or a solution for a non-existent problem).
Iíve only ever used it on one 10-22 rifle, out of many.

That one was a loose fit in the stock- truck gun, so Loctite was chosen over anything expensive or time consuming.

FWIW

DrG
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