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  #16  
Old 09-22-2019, 06:20 PM
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Olde guns aficionados are a dying breed but as some know the market for most old 'stuff' comes and goes and only time will tell how it plays out in the future. I'll never know.
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Old 09-22-2019, 06:31 PM
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I think there will be a market for old stuff. It might skip a generation or two though.
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Old 09-22-2019, 06:49 PM
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Im 66, been into a number of 'guy' collectables since about 15. Stuff was way cheaper back then....and so were wages. A dollar was 'worth more'; ie, it had higher purchase power. Yeah, wages have gone up and so have prices. When we account for inflation (resulting in decreased purchase power of each dollar) we have to figure our just how that relates to how much and when we bought something and what we have to get now to Just Be Even with Inflation.
I mostly dont see it. Asking prices on vintage stuff are high, selling is down, the folks interested in anything other than Colt's and Winchesters are fading and the prices actually achieved are often (when accounting for inflation) LESS than what I bought for. Oh, well, I got to play with 'em.......sure weren't an investment.
And this is NOW, imagine what it will be like in a few years with more inflation, more buyer/transfer restrictions and more 'black gun' buyers.
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  #19  
Old 09-23-2019, 02:20 AM
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Most 50+ year old steel & walnut guns are durable and serviceable, so many of them (especially higher end examples) will still be around and in good shape for decades to come.

Even someone negative toward firearms, upon finding Grandpa's Purdey stashed under his death bed, is generally gonna assume that it's valuable. He'll find out what it's worth and sell it.

Since we know that this will occur in most cases, the pool of available vintage firearms will continue to grow. So overall, their value will decrease.

And that's not taking the younger generation's disposable mentality into account.
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  #20  
Old 09-23-2019, 08:44 AM
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I think there will always be collectors, serious collectors and casual collectors,the numbers will not be high (they are not now) but they will be there. The younger black plastic shooters of today will start to appreciate the craftsmanship of the old wood and steel as they get into old age. The higher end collectors that pay big $ for there collections tend not to be in the open with there collections.
A friend that is very careful about who knows about his collection https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum....php?t=1149195
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  #21  
Old 09-23-2019, 09:35 AM
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Originally Posted by outdoorman View Post
I am an 'older' shooter who especially likes 22's made of wood and steel; what some might call 'vintage' firearms.
I enjoy holding and shooting guns made from 1970's and earlier.
One of the concerns I have is that these firearms seem to be enjoyed by older persons like myself so I wonder if they will lose their value in the future as I suspect younger generation shooters/gun owners prefer the modern 'black' plastic-stocked guns.
Do others think that our valued collection of older guns will depreciate in values because lack of interest in future years?
Im 42 and in the last 4 years, have gone back to wood and blue.

Why?

Takes me back to being a child and learning to shoot with my grandfathers, great uncles,father and uncles.

Many of you here are those people listed above and while you see the younger generation gravitating towards the polymer framed firearms. You have also introduced them/us to what "class" looks and feels like.

Nothing feels better to me, than stalking squirrels with my 452 American or Browning TBolt. They feel right, they shoot straight and they look classy when you pull them out of a gun case.

I am in no way knocking polymer framed/stocked firearms. I own my share of both, but wood and blue, they have found their way back into my life and will be a huge part of my sons life.
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  #22  
Old 09-23-2019, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by dlong View Post
Folks in the watch forums are saying the same thing. With the Apple Watch and smart phone, millennials and Gerald aren’t interested in mechanical watches. Nor do they want to spend the money. But, like anything else, there will be a few.
I dont get wearing a watch that needs to be charged every couple of days. They wont last any longer than a smart phone will 3-4 years. I was given a LACO mechanical watch 20 years ago. It went in for service one time to be cleaned and I wear that watch everyday.
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  #23  
Old 09-23-2019, 10:01 AM
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If you had bought all of those Lugers that were selling for $19.95+ $4.00 Shipping and handling to your door, in 1967, . . .
I always wonder what a share or Walmart stock was worth in 1967 and what it is worth today...

Walmart stock was first offered in 1970....$16.50 a share

As of 2018 there has been 11, two for one stock splits.....your $16.50 investment would be worth over $1,400,000..... (And this doesn't count dividends)

A little better than buying a few old guns!

https://www.fool.com/investing/2017/...gest-reta.aspx

"Wal-Mart has had 11 two-for-one stock splits since its initial public offering, so that 100 shares purchased at the IPO price of $16.50 (for a total investment of $16,500) would today amount to over 200,000 shares and $14 million of equity. As that math suggests, the stock-price run has produced many millionaires over the decades. The biggest winners have been Waltons, who, for the last three years, have topped Forbes' listing of the richest families in America."
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  #24  
Old 09-23-2019, 12:19 PM
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I don't look at my vintage firearms collection as an investment but I think they will always hold some value. I use them but try to handle them with care as I know they will outlast me. I do have some stocks and real estate that have increased in value. I look at the overall financial portfolio picture. Would I have been happier if I spent my earnings on more stocks rather than firearms? No. Did My family go without because I bought an old firearm? No. I expect I will die owning some firearms and money unless some unforeseen social breakdown or medical condition. So far my firearms values have gone up enough to satisfy me. I think there will be some value adjustment in the future but they won't go to zero. Individuals collecting anything is a relatively recent phenomena in human history along with the rise of the middle class.
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  #25  
Old 09-23-2019, 03:08 PM
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I have a living trust and my youngest son is the first trustee when I die. I've already asked him about my firearms and he wants all of them. From muzzle loaders to machineguns. The other son and my daughter have little interest in the guns. Maybe other stuff but not the guns.

I shoot all of my firearms, the older one's frequently.
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  #26  
Old 09-24-2019, 05:58 AM
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I've seen it as well . . .

. . . I hope revolvers are able to survive, as the semiautomatic pistol is all the rage. Happily, high power cartridges are too strong for pistols, so revolvers and single shot handguns will continue. At least as long as handgun hunting is still legal.

The well made 'Farmer's Friend' (single shot break open shotgun) I'm afraid is done for. Pumps are often competitively priced next to them and many shooters will choose it over the single shot. They fail to realize that humble single shot is lighter to carry, a handy companion to those who count on that. Most of the recent manufactured single shots are manufactured for the budget conscious. The old Winchester 37 - Iver Johnson Champion and others - mainly for collectors and nostalgic.
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  #27  
Old 09-24-2019, 07:41 AM
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I have a theory that men eventually accumulate/collect the things that struck their fancy when they were young. They can't afford those things when they are young but the desire never leaves them. Later, when they have means, they buy the things that they couldn't afford when they were children or young men.

The best example is cars. I was born in 1959 and grew up in the 1960s and '70s. The "cool" cars were the 1960s/'70s muscle cars. If were ever to satisfy the itch for an old car, that's what it would be. Guys who grew up 20 years before me would have coveted a '57 Chevy or perhaps an old Thunderbird. That's what you'd likely find in their garage. That guy's Dad probably had a Model A as his project/dream car.

In other words, it's a generational thing. When we get money, we chase the muse of our youth.

It's true for cars, but it's also true for guns. The kids who grew up hunting with their dad or granddad in the 1960s and '70s longed for a Browning A5 or Model 12 shotgun, a Remington BDL rifle or maybe a Ruger .22 pistol. Those represented the epitome of gun cool and that's what they want when they get money to spend. Today's kids have different objects of desire. They grew up playing video games and watching adventure movies. They gravitate toward black guns and tactical style stuff. They have no interest in blued steel and fine wood.

Unless future generations have some experience that connects them to the old guns, they'll never have much interest in them. That can change. A few years of popular Western-era movies could revive interest in Winchester lever actions and Colt Single Action revolvers. A hugely popular video game based on World War II would do wonders for Garand sales.

Anyway, you get the point. It's all about chasing a dream and satisfying the imagination. It's hard to be nostalgic if you don't have a memory.

The corollary to all this is that there is a wave of collectors that passes through time. Each generation has its own interests that make certain items popular. Once that generation gets old they stop buying. They downsize, move into a nursing home or die off. They leave behind all this STUFF that the next generation has little interest in buying. The result is that supply increases, and with little demand, prices fall.

Last edited by Bladeswitcher; 09-24-2019 at 07:45 AM.
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  #28  
Old 09-24-2019, 08:25 AM
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There is a lot of truth in the Generational Theory.
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  #29  
Old 09-24-2019, 08:31 AM
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I remember the gun magazines in the nineties most writers preferred the S&W revolver over the Colt Python. They were available used for about the same amount of money. The Python was considered "too delicate" or something. All it takes is restricted availability and a popular TV show or movie sometimes to turn things around.
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  #30  
Old 09-24-2019, 09:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bladeswitcher View Post
When we get money, we chase the muse of our youth.
Worth repeating.
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