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  #16  
Old 02-09-2015, 10:58 PM
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  #17  
Old 02-10-2015, 11:51 PM
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I vote that this should be a "Sticky"
I think we can do that.
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  #18  
Old 02-18-2015, 10:44 PM
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Concentration on sight vs target

I don't understand the logic and physics(?)of concentration on the sight ,ie crosshairs versus the target.
Logically, it seems you would want to concentrate on the target and let the sight float and the secondary muscle memory fire shoot while maintaining the concentration on the target.
This is how Archery is taught with both instinctive and sighted bows.
Similar to throwing a ball. You keep your eye on the target at the other end, not the ball in your hand. Why doesn't that logic apply to firearms?
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  #19  
Old 02-18-2015, 10:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carpfisher2 View Post
I don't understand the logic and physics(?)of concentration on the sight ,ie crosshairs versus the target.
Logically, it seems you would want to concentrate on the target and let the sight float and the secondary muscle memory fire shoot while maintaining the concentration on the target.
This is how Archery is taught with both instinctive and sighted bows.
Similar to throwing a ball. You keep your eye on the target at the other end, not the ball in your hand. Why doesn't that logic apply to firearms?
What you describe applies to shotguns. As far as the logic/physics, I have no idea but it works.
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  #20  
Old 02-19-2015, 05:01 AM
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If you aren't focused sharply on the front sight, you will not notice when the muzzle has moved off-target. Front sight focus is required to hold the muzzle steady on the target.
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  #21  
Old 02-19-2015, 12:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carpfisher2 View Post
I don't understand the logic and physics(?)of concentration on the sight ,ie crosshairs versus the target.
Logically, it seems you would want to concentrate on the target and let the sight float and the secondary muscle memory fire shoot while maintaining the concentration on the target.
This is how Archery is taught with both instinctive and sighted bows.
Similar to throwing a ball. You keep your eye on the target at the other end, not the ball in your hand. Why doesn't that logic apply to firearms?
With iron sights it is not physics, it is geometry.

Sight alignment = the perceived relationship between the rear sight and front sight.

Sight picture = the perceived relationship between the front sight and target.

With iron sights an error in sight alignment can have much more of an effect on bullet point of impact than does an error in sight picture.

Draw a simple picture looking down on a barrel with iron sights with a target in front of it.

With the front sight centered in the rear sight the line of sight is straight to the target.

Now imagine the front sight is 1 degree or 5 degrees...etc off center relative to the rear sight. Now draw a line from the rear sight to the front sight and on downrange. You can envision it does not take much to greatly offset the POI.

Given the distance between the front and rear sights you can calculate how much change in POI 'X' amount of offset in sight alignment will cause.

The shorter the intersight distance the greater the resulting POI displacement.

This is why pistols with short intersight distance are harder to shoot accurately and why rifle competitors add bloop tubes to increase the intersight distance.

Couple all this sight alignment stuff with the fact that the eye cannot focus both on the front sight and on the target. You need to focus on the front sight so you can confirm it is properly aligned with the rear sight and then properly aligned with the target. The fact that the target and rear sight are somewhat out of focus does not matter.

Last edited by NMC_EXP; 02-20-2015 at 11:41 PM. Reason: add detail
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  #22  
Old 02-20-2015, 06:55 AM
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OK, I have had the kool-ade and I'm on board with this for iron sights. We had a lengthy discussion on this at dinner after the weekly league meeting.
I was interesting to hear that others had the same questions. One of the guys is a President's 100 shooter and it hard to argue with his experience and the science of the model.
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  #23  
Old 02-20-2015, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Carpfisher2 View Post
OK, I have had the kool-ade and I'm on board with this for iron sights. We had a lengthy discussion on this at dinner after the weekly league meeting.
I was interesting to hear that others had the same questions. One of the guys is a President's 100 shooter and it hard to argue with his experience and the science of the model.
Focusing the eye on the front sight when breaking a shot is counter-intuitive and is therefore a hard thing to learn (and teach).

If the shooter is 40+ years old and has enough presbyopia, it may require an eyeglass prescription specifically for shooting which allows a sharp focus on the front sight without completely losing the target.

Besides greater POI precision, front sight focus has other benefits:

(1) It allows you to "call the shot". You know where the rifle was pointed when the shot broke. This allows you to confirm your zero so you do not make a sight adjustment based on a bad shot.

(2) For many, the combination of mentally (as well as physically) focusing on the front sight plus being mentally prepared to capture a freeze frame image of the sight picture at the instant the shot breaks (calling the shot) helps trigger control, especially in offhand shooting.

Not sure why this works. Could be it simply gives the brain something productive to do during the trigger squeeze phase besides worry about firing a bad shot. Worrying about firing a bad shot often resulting in doing just that.
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  #24  
Old 02-20-2015, 11:04 PM
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Contrary to the popular thoughts of the Multi-task environment, the conscious mind can only think about or concentrate on one thing at a time. This leads to supporting statement about giving the mind something to do. And the bottom line when it comes to shooting, the most important (to me) is aiming. Everything else has to automatic or muclememory action. So Front sight in Iron Sight shooting,, the Bulllseye in Archery, or the Bird in Trap/Skeet, ya gotta keep aiming until the shot is complete.

Relative to the presbyopia, I have started using a "diopter device" to help with that. I have a Lyman Hawkeye that works well. . . I have used this for years for the CMP type shooting. M1 at 200 yards. It really sharpens up the fron sight and the target is still clear. I have just recently experimented with taking a pair of safety glasses, drilling a 3/64" hole in the right spot, then spray painting the inside of the lens black and that also works well. This is alot cheaper than glasses.

Last edited by Carpfisher2; 02-20-2015 at 11:09 PM.
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  #25  
Old 02-20-2015, 11:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carpfisher2 View Post
Contrary to the popular thoughts of the Multi-task environment, the conscious mind can only think about or concentrate on one thing at a time. This leads to supporting statement about giving the mind something to do. And the bottom line when it comes to shooting, the most important (to me) is aiming. Everything else has to automatic or muclememory action. So Front sight in Iron Sight shooting,, the Bulllseye in Archery, or the Bird in Trap/Skeet, ya gotta keep aiming until the shot is complete.

Relative to the presbyopia, I have started using a "diopter device" to help with that. I have a Lyman Hawkeye that works well. . . I have used this for years for the CMP type shooting. M1 at 200 yards. It really sharpens up the fron sight and the target is still clear. I have just recently experimented with taking a pair of safety glasses, drilling a 3/64" hole in the right spot, then spray painting the inside of the lens black and that also works well. This is alot cheaper than glasses.
I agree re: multitasking being a crock.

I believe conscious thought is required while preparing for the shot. Examples being adjusting natural point of aim, checking wind conditions...etc.

Once aiming begins the shooter should switch to what has been described as "non verbal thought" and releasing the trigger should happen without your conscious mind shouting "pull the trigger NOW!"

The shooter cannot be oblivious. Still need to detect changes in wind direction and velocity, hear a cease fire command...etc. But trigger release should occur on autopilot, apparently without conscious thought.

The use of a small rear aperture is known to increase the depth of field and thereby enhance the eyes ability to see the front sight and target. This is an advantage with match as opposed to service rifles. A match rifle can be equipped with an adjustable rear iris.

If you do not already do so, you might find blackening the front sight on your M1 with carbide or a spray will help. Light reflecting off a front post can cause a lot of trouble
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  #26  
Old 02-23-2015, 04:53 PM
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Some good basics on dry firing from one of my dream girls Kirsten Joy Weiss.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNuMFdy63tw
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  #27  
Old 03-07-2015, 10:42 AM
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In the sitting position...what is a good bone support? I rest my elbows on the inside of my knees(sit crossed legged right over left). I seem to shoot better when I kneel, with the bone fundamentals/support. Is there a good bone support for sitting?
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  #28  
Old 03-07-2015, 12:14 PM
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Some good basics on dry firing from one of my dream girls Kirsten Joy Weiss.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNuMFdy63tw
PWNolan - I would do ANYTHING KJW told me to!!!!!!!!!!!! I could easily imagine my interest in positional shooting increasing exponentially with a coach like that!!!!!!!!

John
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  #29  
Old 03-07-2015, 12:33 PM
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Yupp...that young Lady is well schooled..real EZ to watch and learn. Jerry Miculek is very knowledgeable and I learn a bunch from him but given the 2...ummmm I prefer watching KJW.
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  #30  
Old 01-24-2017, 09:45 AM
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Question

I have a question regarding the use of a peep or iris device on glasses.

I'm 61 and, of course, have presbyopia. I wear line-less trifocals where the lower part of the lenses are 'reading glasses', the mid-lens is for the computer screen, and the upper part of the lens has some mild correction for distance (until two years ago it was zero correction). I have no other vision adjustments needed.

When I shoot irons, I am usually using a rear peep (like Tech Sights) or a rear iris (like Gehmann). When shooting with the Tech Sights, the area of my glasses that's needed to bring the front sight into sharp focus is in the wrong position. Even through the peep, the front sight is just a but out of focus. Rather than getting a pair of glasses that is specifically for shooting, I was wondering if a peep device affixed to my glasses would help. Perhaps something like the Lyman Hawkeye or the Merit Iris would help. Or would that be essentially be a double-peep and just stupid?

I could experiment with a makeshift peep for my glasses, but I thought it just better to ask those with experience.

Thanks in advance,
Andrew

PS. When I shoot with the Gehmann I don't have the front sight focus issue. Whether that is because of the iris being so close to my eye, the iris being placed in the correct part of my lens, or a combination of both, I am not sure. I suspect it is because the iris is so close to my eye, because if I shoot with non-corrective safety glasses the front sight is still in focus.
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