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  #16  
Old 11-24-2018, 10:37 PM
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Stick your take down bolt firmly up in the stock ferrule and measure how much it protrudes inside. Compare that measurement with how much distance you have in the receiver lug to barrel contact. Ideally you want a bit of clearance rather than exact to barrel.
This is assuming the rec. lug is actually sitting down tight on the stock support when assembled. As said, lipstick can tell you that as would modeling clay.
I suggest 10-12, no more than 16 Inch #s torque. That is achievable using only the short leg of the Allen Wrench for leverage with thumb and two fingers (no cheater bar or t-handle wrench). In fact, that is why the short leg on those, it is proportionate to the often typical torque for the dia. of the flats/screw shank.
For starters I suggest getting the rec. screw seating solid and using a barrel pressure pad (if needed) at different locations (much test firing required with good ammo) before jumping into bedding the receiver.
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  #17  
Old 08-26-2019, 04:42 PM
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Technique and results of bedding the MagPul 10/22 stock

Many months have elapsed since I started this thread. Now it's time for the follow-up to show what I did to bed the MagPul stock and the results of that effort.

The thing that precipitated my interest in bedding the stock was the fact that the barreled action would move fore and aft, side to side, and would tetter-totter no matter which take down bolt I used, how short I made one, or how tightly I torqued it. I had replaced the skinny Ruger barrel with a 20" Kidd tapered barrel so the barrel was not touching the forend to at least prevent the teeter-tottering.

Having never bedded a rifle before I read everything I could put my hands on to learn the mystical, magical art of bedding. What follows is a pictorial of my first ever effort to bed a rifle. I acknowledge that my efforts were not a work of art. You'll see voids in the bedding, ragged edges, and bits of blue painters tape that I haven't yet gotten out of the hardened epoxy. Still, the bedding is doing its job of holding the action very, very securely. There is no longer any movement anywhere.

My biggest error doing the job was not using enough epoxy for fear of creating a mechanical lock between the stock and the action. I should have been a bit more aggressive in this regard.

Here's the rifle after its second range session. Harris bipod, Vortex 4-12x scope, Burris Signature rings, BX trigger group, CPC truing up of the bolt face, my own trigger job, and a few after-market internal parts.




Here's what I was getting for groups with the scope set at 4x and using a twenty year old box of PMC target ammo. I've got a way to go but these initial results are encouraging.




Here are all the metal parts.



This is the epoxy I used.



I spent days examining every square inch of the stock and the action as I worked out my plan for what had to be done and in what sequence. The stock areas corresponding to the action areas indicated in the picture below were where I wanted to put the epoxy.




The MagPul insert was up first. I drilled holes, countersunk them, and used a soldering iron in places not able to be drilled to create a mechanical locking terrain. I also used a Dremel 80 grit sanding drum to rough up the factory smooth surfaces.




Here's the insert side that's away from the barrel. You can see where I used a
countersink drill bit to create a sort of Venturi looking effect on the drilled holes. Serious mechanical locking with these.




Here you see the forend just prior to me mixing up the first batch of epoxy. Plumbers Putty is nasty, sticky stuff. It took me a while to get it all out after I'd finished but it did its job. Someone here suggested sprinkling powdered graphite on top of the putty to prevent it from sticking to the waxed barrel. That turned out to be an excellent piece of advice.

The blue painters tape is obvious. You can see little green and brown balls around the take down bolt hole. I bought these from a craft store after I couldn't figure out a better way to fill in the huge gaps. The green ones are plastic beads while the brown ones are wood beads. I dipped them one at a time into some JB Weld then stuck them in the holes. The epoxy then flowed over and around them to create yet another solid mechanical bond.




Here's another shot of that area from a lower angle. You can see where I drilled holes at the front of the mag well where I will be applying epoxy.




Here's what the area looked like after the epoxy had hardened. You can see I put a few too many holes in the insert. My initial plan was to epoxy the sides of the lock block area but at the last minute I decided not to.




Same area from a lower angle. The front of the mag well can be seen at the bottom. Note the void on the left side. Should'a used more goop.




Now we move to the trigger group area. The arrows are pointing to the areas I wanted to bed. This is an after picture and if you look closely, you can see the bedding material at the tips of those arrows.




Below is a picture showing the bedding areas around the magazine well. Once again, this is an after picture and you can see the bedding material at the arrows.




Here's a close-up picture of the front of the magazine well area. You've seen this area in a couple of the previous pictures.




Below is a picture of the front of the mag well after the epoxy hardened. I'm not exactly Leonardo da Vinci but the bedding is solid and fits the action like a glove.




Here's a close-up picture of the front of the mag well area.




Here's the back of the mag well area that a bedded to make contact with the front of the trigger group. I used the soldering iron to good effect here. This is a view of the left side of the stock taken from below.




Here's a view of the right side of the stock taken from below to show what the epoxy looked like after it hardened. Awfully ugly in retrospect but works very well.




Here's a close-up of the rear of the magazine well showing the epoxy and where it contacts the trigger group.






I just hit the limit on the number of pictures allowed in one post. I'll finish everything up in the next post.

Last edited by Steve_Allentown; 08-26-2019 at 04:48 PM.
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  #18  
Old 08-26-2019, 04:45 PM
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Below is a picture of the rear of the stock showing the ledge under which the rounded portion of the trigger group fits. The contact patch between this ledge and the trigger group was quite small so my objective with the epoxy was to make the contact patch as large as possible. I was only able to drill several small holes in this area so I had to make extensive use of the soldering iron here.




Here is the result of the bedding in this area.




Here's what that area looks like after the epoxy hardened.




Finally, this is what that area looks like from above. Looks like a volcano erupted but it makes contact with the trigger group in all the right areas. It provides a much larger area for the action to sit on and fills in the big gap between the stock and the back of the receiver.


Last edited by Steve_Allentown; 08-26-2019 at 04:51 PM.
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  #19  
Old 08-26-2019, 05:55 PM
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Good shooting!
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  #20  
Old 09-13-2019, 09:49 AM
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Reading this topic for the first time. What a great job of documenting your work.
Unless I missed it I only saw an after target. How much improvement is this from pre-bedding?
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  #21  
Old 09-13-2019, 09:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heli_av8tor View Post
What a great job of documenting your work.
Thanks. It gave me a chance to get more familiar with this little Sony camera that was given to me as a gift.

Quote:
Unless I missed it I only saw an after target. How much improvement is this from pre-bedding?
I bought the least expensive 10/22 I could find for the express purpose of replacing the barrel. The day I got the rifle I pulled the barrel and never put a single round through it. In retrospect I missed an opportunity to do a before/after test.
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