BX Info - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > >

Notices

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-06-2018, 01:30 PM
rawhp's Avatar
rawhp
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
USA, CA
Posts: 
1,638
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
BX Trigger Info



Log in to see fewer ads
Purpose:
Compiling some info from various forum threads and elsewhere and combining with my own observations and experience with the BX Trigger into one thread. Perhaps some of the information will be helpful, either to make an informed decision on purchasing the trigger or for modifying it. I still have more work planned for my BX, so I’ll add more info and references later.

Background:
I purchased a BX Trigger last July cheap on an ebay auction just for the heck of it, with no intended plans. I measured the pull when I got it, 2 Ĺ lbs. and consistent, but it sat in my parts bin until yesterday.

I recently broke down and bought a black Arkansas stone to supplement the other stones I’ve used over the years for trigger work. My first project, to clean up my 22/45 trigger, came out great, dropping it from 2 Ĺ to 2 lbs. Yesterday, I decided that the BX would be the next guinea pig.

Observations:
After tearing the trigger down, the first thing that stands out is the sear. It’s completely different in appearance than the factory sear (photos to follow later). On closer examination, the trigger is noticeably different as well, especially the pin locations, as you can see from these photos from Tactical Innovations’ website:
Non-BX: http://www.tacticalinc.com/imagemagi...00&h=400&page=
BX: http://www.tacticalinc.com/imagemagi...00&h=400&page=
The hammer actually looks very close to the normal factory hammer, so I may need to do some closer inspection of the BX and normal hammer side by side.

Another observation is that the trigger, disconnector, and sear all stay together as a group, even without a slave pin, which makes repetitive assembly/disassembly really easy when doing trigger work and testing! (see post #12 on why)

Results so far:
I do my trigger work on 10/22s, addressing two distinct areas; trigger reset and break. For the former, you can only lighten the trigger return spring so much before it won’t reliably reset. After that, you need to smooth out the sear nose and disconnector hook in order to go lighter. With the BX, I was able to reduce the trigger rebound down to about 1 1/4 lb. and still have a nice clean reset (sharp click). The only reason I didn’t cut any more coils from the return spring was I was running out of length to bring the hammer fully forward, not because of friction in the trigger components. My conclusion is that the BX geometry actually helps trigger reset as well. I think to go lower on the reset, I’d need a lighter spring rate or switch to a torsion or bobby pin spring mod.

Because replacement parts for the hammer and sear aren’t readily available, I tried to be very conservative when adjusting them. Under the magnifying glass, while pretty good compared to the normal trigger, there was definitely still more left to clean up minor imperfections. I’m sure that I could get some gains by just polishing them, but that would have only resulted in shiny imperfections, so I decided to carefully polish them with my new stone. After setting up the hammer in my vise, I noticed that the notch was very close to neutral, which is way better than the non-BX trigger. After removing the imperfections, I did a quick polish with Simichrome and called it done.

I did the same with the sear, but also gave the leading edge a half dozen swipes at 45 degrees to improve the letoff. I know there are different schools of thought on this, but it works for me, not saying anyone else should do it.

The end result is a 1 lb. 12 oz. pull, and clean enough for my own liking for now. My overall conclusion is that the BX took a lot less work to go sub 2lbs than my other factory triggers, especially on the reset. It’s definitely a superior design, so there seems to be a lot of potential once the aftermarket catches up (unless there is a patent that prevents that).

My next mod will either be a bobby pin/piano wire return spring using the existing trigger, or buying the metal TI trigger and modding it for a torsion return spring, shooting for 1 1/2 lb. or less.

Forum and Internet References:
Parts from the BX Trigger are interchangeable in other Ruger and aftermarket trigger housings, metal or plastic, as long as the trigger, sear, disconnector, and hammer are switched out as a group:
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums....php?t=1068618

Brimstone offers a Tier 2-like trigger job on the BX, replacing the trigger with a specially machined metal unit. They initially offered a pull down to 1 lb., but moved it up to 1.5lb to ensure reliability:
https://www.brimstonegunsmithing.com...x-trigger-work

Trigger pulls out of the box seem to be in the 2 lb. to 2.75 lb. range (various posts)

So far, it looks like there is only one replacement part for the BX Trigger’s main components; the actual trigger blade:

TI Anodized BX trigger blade:
http://www.tacticalinc.com/billet-tr...ly-p-7292.html

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...49#post9356849
(it looks like TI has applied for a patent on the metal blade: https://www.google.com/patents/US20160327357)

Brimstone Cerakoted BX trigger blade, machined for torsion return spring:
https://www.brimstonegunsmithing.com...tom-bx-trigger

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...9&postcount=19

Last edited by rawhp; 03-04-2018 at 07:56 PM. Reason: distinguish between trigger and other "BX" parts
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-06-2018, 04:20 PM
Bob.
US Army Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jun 2012
Location: 
Spencer IN
Posts: 
68
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
No experience with a BX, good to know the BX has a near neutral engagement.
I also do the 45 edge sometimes for even a crisper break.
I'll sometimes use 2000 grit sand paper "wet" on a thin knife blade to polish the hammer and sear, under a big lighted magnifier.
Nice write up, good info
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-06-2018, 06:05 PM
rawhp's Avatar
rawhp
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
USA, CA
Posts: 
1,638
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob. View Post
No experience with a BX, good to know the BX has a near neutral engagement.
I also do the 45 edge sometimes for even a crisper break.
I'll sometimes use 2000 grit sand paper "wet" on a thin knife blade to polish the hammer and sear, under a big lighted magnifier.
Nice write up, good info
Me too, but using a single edge razor blade. But I think the stone is giving better results since I can control the angles better.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 02-07-2018, 08:50 AM
Tsb3's Avatar
Tsb3
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2014
Location: 
Michigan
Posts: 
661
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
rawhp this will be a good source of info for all those who want to "play" with the BX.
Thanks for takin the time!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-09-2018, 04:25 PM
rawhp's Avatar
rawhp
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
USA, CA
Posts: 
1,638
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Comparison Pics and Trigger Work

Component Pics and Comparisons:

Here are some pics, showing the BX Trigger parts and comparing them with the regular factory Ruger trigger parts.

Notice first that the BX Trigger components are actually stamped with numbers for each part. Sear #1, Disconnector #2, Hammer #3, and Trigger #4. Also note how the sear and hammer pin hole is lined up, without a slave pin!! So nice

The Sear and Disconnector are easy to distinguish from the normal parts (I didn't include a picture of the normal disconnector since I didn't have one handy, but notice the hook on the BX, lower left pic, which is narrrower than the rest of the disconnector body, when the normal one would be the full width of the disconnector).



Comparing the sears, aside from the obvious difference in shape, the engagement surface of the BX is situated much more in line with the pivot hole, which looks to create a more neutral letoff when rotating and breaking.

In the lower right picture, the BX Hammer is on the left, and a Bubba'd example of the normal Ruger hammer is on the right. Looking more closely below, with the pivot holes lined up using a drill bit, you can see that the hammer hook is located further from the pivot. I believe locating further from the pivot point would reduce the pressure between the hammer hook and sear surfaces, all else being equal.



Also note that the angle of the hook is near neutral (extending an imaginary line from the hook to the center of the pivot hole), in the right pic.


More Fine Tuning:

Although I didn't want to take the the trigger much further, due to lack of replacement parts, I couldn't help myself. I figure I'm willing to take some risks in the name of science . Besides, a BX Trigger is less than the cost of a brick of decent target ammo .

Since the new starting point is 1 lb 12 oz, and the trigger return/reset weight is 1lb 4oz, that would leave about 8 oz left required to cause the trigger to break. I would need to cut that in half to get a 1 1/2 lb break. The traditional method of getting there is to reduce the hammer hook depth, since I'd already smoothed out the engagement surfaces as much as I could. I really didn't want to Bubba the hammer (you can see I've done that before ) but there really wasn't a choice. Working with my India stone, and proceeding carefully (and safety testing by hammering on the trigger body at various angles with my plastic hammer to see if I could cause a failure), I finally got there.

But it wasn't done yet. Had to test the safety, so I cocked the hammer, engaged the safety, and pressed the trigger. Seemed OK, but releasing the safety, the sear was right at the edge, and the hammer would probably drop if you breathed on it. Arghh, I really didn't want to alter the sear, but I was at the point of no return, so downstairs to the garage, 4 or 5 whacks with my 3 lb sledge, and the sear leg was peened. Reassembled, with fingers crossed, I tested the safety again, and it functioned perfectly .



Top left, hammer hook after polishing with black Arkansas stone. Top right, radiused surfaced after India stoning to reduce hook depth. Lower left, finished components after final polishing (if you look closely at the sear, you can see how much engagement the hammer hook has by the light marks on the surface). Lower right, post-peened sear leg.

Pics showing how much of the trigger return spring was snipped off. I don't think you'd ever be able to snip that much from a normal trigger, no matter how much you polished the disconnector hook and sear. I think narrowing the disconnector hook (3rd pic of the first set at the top of the post) was an ingenious way of reducing the drag and allowing a lighter reset. I'm wondering if that trick would work on a normal Ruger trigger .



Other Trigger Spring Options?

Lastly, I decided to try a non-evasive test to see if a bobby pin or torsion return spring mod would provide any gains. I made a test spring from piano wire and installed it. I kept the other end of the spring long so I slowly rotate it until I could get a clean reset. I couldn't get a reset that was lower than the normal plunger return spring, so I'm scrapping the idea. To me, it just illustrates how improved the BX geometry and design is when it comes to the energy needed to reset the trigger.


Torsion spring along the right side of the housing, with leg on the end pressing on the rear of the trigger.

EDIT 02/11: "so I'm scrapping the idea" OK, I'm rethinking this. I'm looking at the metal replacement trigger on the TI website, and may take the plunge, since I really don't like the cheesy feel of a plastic trigger (I can deal with the housing, but the actual feel of the trigger to my finger). If I do, I'll mill it for a torsion spring, so I can use the current plunger location for my overtravel stop. I've been reading more about torsion springs, and why the conversion works well, and come to the conclusion for the amount of travel/compression that the spring goes through, it more closely mimics a constant force spring (not following Hook's Law) than the factory compression spring. For the plunger spring, the point at which reset occurs is near the end of the travel, where the force is lowest, where as for the break, it's more compressed, contributing more to weight. The torsion spring has very little travel, so the amount of increase between the two is very small. I watched a few YouTube videos on garage door spring (torsion), and thought about how the forces work in the first 6 inches or so of travel, when basically the full weight of the door is being counterbalanced and how that would relate to the trigger torsion spring and constant forces.

Lastly, another observation I made this morning, is that for my 3 regular factory triggers, once the hammer drops, the trigger remains fully to rear, against the overtravel stop. It only moves forward when cocking the hammer. On the BX, the trigger moves fully forward after the hammer drops, so there's something fundamentally different. I'll need to study that more, but thought I'd throw that out there. (after replacing the trigger blade and switching to the torsion trigger return spring in the posts below, including adding the overtravel stop, this behavior is now the same as the factory trigger, not sure why)

Last edited by rawhp; 03-02-2018 at 12:18 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-14-2018, 06:09 PM
Black_Catfish

Join Date: 
Dec 2017
Posts: 
27
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I picked up a BX trigger group a few months ago and after installing it I'm getting no primer strikes. I can tell it's the new trigger group because when I reinstall the stock trigger the rifle goes bang.
Anything I should look for in the BX trigger pack to fix it or should I just send it back?
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-16-2018, 02:16 AM
rawhp's Avatar
rawhp
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
USA, CA
Posts: 
1,638
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black_Catfish View Post
I picked up a BX trigger group a few months ago and after installing it I'm getting no primer strikes. I can tell it's the new trigger group because when I reinstall the stock trigger the rifle goes bang.
Anything I should look for in the BX trigger pack to fix it or should I just send it back?
I only tried my BX trigger one time, just to test it at the range when I first got it, and did have a couple of failures to fire. Examining the cases, I noticed light firing pin strikes on those rounds. Since I wasn't going to be using it for a while anyway, I decided to diagnose it later, so I guess now is later. Here's what I've found:

I did several measurements /comparisons with a normal late model factory trigger and the BX, and using a spare bolt. Placing the bolt on top of the trigger group, and moving it back against the un-cocked hammer until the hammer was straight up and contacting the upper and lower rear of the bolt evenly, I took note of the bolt position relative the housing (using the trigger group pin holes for reference). The bolt lined up exactly the same on both trigger groups, so I eliminated the hammer position as an issue for now, although I'm going to do more careful analysis later.

I decided to do some firing pin strike testing between the two groups, using some spent cases. The BX strikes were definitely lighter:

Hard to tell in the poor lighting, but the top and bottom strikes a from the BX and the ones on either side are the normal group. The difference is easier to see in real life.


Next I removed the hammer spring assembly from the two groups, and noticed immediately a difference in the springs. The BX spring uses smaller spring wire, and more coils. I then disassembled both for side by side comparison. I also had a spare spring from a JWH hammer kit handy, so I compared that as well. The JWH used wire similar to the normal factory trigger:

BX on the left, normal factory in the middle, JWH on the far right.


I also notice while disassembling, that the BX spring wasn't as strong as the normal hammer spring.

EDIT 2/17 - I looked in my parts bin and found another factory hammer spring. That one looks the SAME as the BX trigger spring. I tested it in the BX trigger, and got similar results, with a lighter firing pin strike. This leads me to believe that a stronger trigger spring is only a bandaid for a possible other issue, at least with my BX trigger group.

Next I tried swapping the BX spring with the spare JWH spring. By feel, it seems that the JWH spring may be slightly extra powered. In testing the strikes again, the normal trigger group and BX with JWH spring were very similar:

Normal on left and BX after spring swap on right


I also tried placing the normal spring assembly into the BX and got similar results. Lastly, I tested the trigger pull of the BX using the JWH spring, and the pull increased by about 4 oz, to 1 lb 12 oz. This pretty much confirmed in my mind that part of the reduce pull of the BX group is due to a lighter hammer spring, which is unfortunate (I prefer an extra power hammer spring, which I have in my other two 10/22s).

Even though I'm bummed about the increase in pull weight, I'd rather have a more reliable trigger, so I'll keep the JWH spring in place for now. I may be able to get the 4 oz back once I convert to the torsion trigger return spring, or at least I hope so.

Black_Catfish - If you get a chance, try swapping out the hammer spring assemblies between your BX and normal trigger groups and see if it helps. It would be good to get a few more data points to see if all BX triggers are using a lighter spring, that some may be slightly under-powered in some cases. EDIT 2/17 - See my new note above. If your springs are the same, swapping probably won't "fix" your issue. I have a couple of ideas that I'm going to look at.

Last edited by rawhp; 02-17-2018 at 12:20 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-16-2018, 05:05 PM
Black_Catfish

Join Date: 
Dec 2017
Posts: 
27
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Awesome info, thank you!

I'll do some playing around with it when I get a chance.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-17-2018, 04:46 PM
rawhp's Avatar
rawhp
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
USA, CA
Posts: 
1,638
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Light strike fix

I think I isolated the issue on my BX trigger group. My conclusion is that the problem is likely a stacking of tolerances between the casting of the bolt, hammer, and perhaps the receiver trigger pin holes (and even the bolt face, if headspace is excessive). If those tolerances add up to a couple hundredths of an inch, they could cause light strikes.

As the folks that play around with these triggers know, the lower part of the 10/22 bolt is actually a safety feature that prevents out of battery firing. That's because it hits the low part of the hammer, preventing the hammer from striking the firing pin, if the bolt is even slightly out of battery:



The lower arrow shows how the bolt keeps the hammer from moving forward enough to strike the firing pin (top arrow). The pic on the right shows how just moving the bolt slightly forward allows the hammer to strike the pin. The difference between the bolt position for the two pics is only a couple hundredths of an inch.

On my BX hammer, I noticed that the lower portion of casting seemed to protrude slightly compared to a normal factory hammer, if I placed a straight edge on the hammer face. I lightly filed that area with a round file until if was level with the rest of the hammer face. I then smoothed the area, as well as the entire hammer face, with wet dry sand paper (240 up to 1200). I tried to match the profile of my regular hammer as much as possible (BX hammer in the foreground of the second pic, non-bubba'd hammer in the back).



EDIT 3/4/18: Here's are comparison pictures after making the slight mod to the hammer face. I took out the hammer springs, used the trigger group pins to line up the BX and factory trigger groups, then used a straight edge to line up both hammers in the vertical position. Both line up now, so in the case of my BX trigger, the lighter strikes appear to have been related to the lower part of the hammer contacting the bolt.





Just to make sure that I didn't compromise the built-in safety factor of the hammer and bolt, I used a couple of paper clips (big and small), and some shims I made out of layers of aluminum tape, to see how far out of battery the bolt needed to be to still fire. I used the original BX hammer spring for the testing.



Since I didn't have any more fired cases to test with, I removed the projectiles and powder from a handful of live rounds, and tested with primer only (muzzle pointed into my trash can). There weren't any pin strikes using either paper clip (0.045", 0.034"), or the first aluminum shim (0.03"). With the thinner aluminum shim (0.02"), I could just see a firing pin mark, but no dent, on the rim. I repeated this test with my normal factory trigger with the same results. After testing, I fired a couple primer-only cases using the BX group and another couple using the normal trigger group. All fired, and both groups had nearly identical firing pin strikes



BX pin strike on the left, normal factory trigger on the right. I'm calling the fix a success. Since I'm back to using the original hammer spring, the trigger pull is back to 1.5#, and I also learned a few things along the way

My TI aluminum trigger arrived yesterday, so I may get to modifying it for a torsion spring this weekend ...but the Daytona 500 is the priority, so we'll see.

Last edited by rawhp; 03-04-2018 at 11:25 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-17-2018, 10:56 PM
rawhp's Avatar
rawhp
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
USA, CA
Posts: 
1,638
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Torsion spring mod

Finished the torsion return spring conversion. Tried a straight swap first to see how the TI trigger felt, and right away found two disappointments.

First, the trigger must be slightly different than the plastic BX since the sear, disconnector and trigger no longer line up by themselves, so you need to be more careful on the install, or use a slave pin (see post below for reason)

Second, probably related to the first issue, the trigger pull increased by just under 4 oz

On the other hand, the aluminum trigger feels more solid or less flexy than the plastic one, so feels better up the wall and breaking feels more precise

The feel of the trigger was enough for me to move forward, knowing that after the conversion, I'd drop a couple of ounces and have an overtravel stop. Not sure if that's worth $20, but it sure is pretty

The "milling" went quickly, since I've done a couple of these before. I use a 1/8" end mill bit in my benchtop drill press, and a 1/8" drill bit as a pivot point for the trigger. I had to be a little more careful since the wall thickness of the trigger is thinner than the normal factory triggers, but I still needed it to be deep enough to allow for the torsion spring width. I used a 1/4" drill bit as a mandrel to wrap the piano wire around for making the torsion spring.



Here's the trigger after cutting the groove. Notice that the trigger and sear hole doesn't line up like the plastic BX trigger. It's puzzling why the dimensions couldn't be perfectly duplicated, but that's just how it is. Also, I noticed the disconnector pin isn't as tight a fit as with the plastic trigger (I may get the oversized pin kit from TriggerShims.com to tighten things up).



Here's the trigger, sear, and disconnector assembled with a slave pin in place and spring snipped to length. I drilled the housing for the return spring stop and over travel stop, and tapped for 8-32 set screws (1/4" for the spring stop, 3/8" for the overtravel), then assembled and adjusted.



The result, right back where I started on the pull weight , but a much nicer feel, and the trigger stop feels good too


Note, I checked my trigger pull gauge, by hanging a container of water, filling it slowly until it registered 1.5 lb. The actual weight on my scale, is 21.54 oz, or 1 lb 5.54 oz.

Only thing left to do for now is cure the spring in the oven. I'm still thinking about replacing the pins with oversized ones, and probably will before I use the trigger group sometime down the line. But I may put it in one of my other 10/22s just to function test it at the range. I'll post an update if the pins make any noticeable difference.

PS. Oh you may notice I changed out the mag release to a metal UTG steel unit. Super cheap, but I like feeling either metal or wood on any parts my fingers come into contact with.

Last edited by rawhp; 03-02-2018 at 11:44 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 02-17-2018, 11:53 PM
rawhp's Avatar
rawhp
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
USA, CA
Posts: 
1,638
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Mystery solved

I was putting the plastic trigger in my parts bin, when I noticed something that solves the mystery about what is different from it and the TI metal trigger. The BX trigger is formed on the inside with slots that effectively capture the sear to keep it in place. Now I understand why it would be so difficult to replicate by machining the material in the inside.



Perhaps it would something that could be replicated through MIM?

EDIT: I switched out the trigger group pins with the oversized ones. Not a real difference in trigger pull weight (went down about 1 oz), but feels cleaner up to the wall before the break. With the stock pins, although the wall is definite, then last tiny bit had a hint of sponginess (took me about 200 pulls before my finger could detect it though). That's gone with the new pins.

Last edited by rawhp; 03-02-2018 at 12:19 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-04-2018, 09:57 AM
Black_Catfish

Join Date: 
Dec 2017
Posts: 
27
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Yes, I can confirm the stock hammer spring and the BX hammer spring are the same. I did try swapping them just for the heck of it and still have a no primer strike issue with the BX trigger.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-04-2018, 10:15 AM
ILIKE1022's Avatar
ILIKE1022

Join Date: 
Aug 2017
Location: 
Jackson, MO
Posts: 
2,558
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
BX trigger at range last Sun. First time shooting the gun.




Last edited by ILIKE1022; 03-04-2018 at 09:51 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-04-2018, 11:29 AM
rawhp's Avatar
rawhp
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
USA, CA
Posts: 
1,638
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black_Catfish View Post
Yes, I can confirm the stock hammer spring and the BX hammer spring are the same. I did try swapping them just for the heck of it and still have a no primer strike issue with the BX trigger.
That's too bad. My guess is a stacking of tolerances. You may be able to get Ruger to exchange it. Does your original group have a metal housing? (you could try swapping all of the guts to the old housing if you want to diagnose it yourself). Also, is the bolt stock?

I added a couple of pics to post #10 above to show one way of comparing your two trigger groups, just to eyeball them to see if something is way out of whack or not. Good luck!

EDIT: Another thought is that a factory firing pin is pretty cheap (~$8 on ebay), so you could try slightly elongating the firing pin hole to allow is to move rearward slightly (maybe 1/32"), so that the BX hammer can strike it. You'd need to do it with something like a needle file, on the side of the hole toward the front, not rear.


Last edited by rawhp; 03-04-2018 at 08:58 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-04-2018, 06:13 PM
Brimstone's Avatar
Brimstone
RFC Sponsor
Law Enforcement Officer NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

RFC Sponsor
Join Date: 
Aug 2011
Location: 
Amboy, WA
Posts: 
517
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
BX Info

You could also just get the Brimstone BX trigger and itís already machined correctly for the BX trigger components and for the torsion trigger return spring


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Please don't PM me! If you've got a message for us, email us through our website, http://www.brimstonegunsmithing.com

Or find us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/BrimstoneGunsmithing
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:46 PM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright ©2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x