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Old 01-11-2004, 04:29 PM
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refinishing a stock?



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Hey guys, I need some advice/help on refinishing a stock...

I have a Remington walnut stock that I want to refinish and I am looking for any/all advice, tips, tools, etc. for getting the job done.

I want to sand it down (to get nicks and scratches out), refinish it (like a blonde to dark brown laminate), bore out the barrel channel a little (to facilitate in free floating/bedding the barrel), and possibly (if someone can help me through it) cutting vents in the forearm (like the Dakota).

I'd love to have everyone's input on this, the best way to do it, how, what tools to use, and what kind of stains/finish oils to use.

Thanks a lot, in advance, for all of your help!
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Old 01-11-2004, 05:34 PM
Mitchell15/22

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As far as removing the finish from the current stock, try a Chemical varnish stripper called: Citristrip. You can use it indoors, and it works great. Cant think of where i got the bottle from (maybe Wal Mart) but the gel is orange colored. Anyway it works wonders and will save you a bunch of time.
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Old 01-11-2004, 05:53 PM
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Shamus
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Please don't try to sand out the dings. Use an Iron with steam to raise the grain after you stripped the old finish off. The compressed wood (ding) will swell and only after it's cooled and dried out should you use sandpaper and then only fine grit. Nothing heavier than say 300 then 500 then after you apply the finish you can use 1000 grit between coats.

Just my 2Ę
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  #4  
Old 01-11-2004, 11:10 PM
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This is the process for what is called a sanded in finish. It gives very nice results. The finish is in the wood not on the wood and makes for a very weather proof finish. This is only worthwile if you are working a nice piece of wood such as walnut.

1. Strip with a chemical stripper. Follow the instructions on the label.
2. After that use 0000 steel wool dipped in the stripper to get any remaining finish off. Always go with the grain of the wood never across the grain.
3. After the finish is removed then use 0000 steel wool dipped in acetone to do a final cleaning of the wood. Acetone is extremely flamable so be very careful. No open flames and plenty of ventilation. Let the stock dry. Use some kind of good rubber gloves to protect your fingers from the acetone. It will remove the oil from your skin and you will have sore fingers.
4. Use a piece of terry cloth dipped in water and dampen the stock. Don't soak the wood but get it wet.
5. Immediately use a propane torch and dry the stock (called whiskering). This will lift the grain and open the pores. You just need to dry the stock so move the flame over the wood quickly. The wood is very delicate at this point so be careful not to ding it.
6. Use a couple layers of wet terry cloth and lay it over any dings and apply a hot clothes iron to the cloth. The ding will raise. If it doesn't fully raise then do it again. Re-wet the cloth as necessary. The iron should sizzle when applied to the cloth. This forces steam into the grain of the wood and causes it to come back to its original shape. It will not repair cuts but it will help a little.
7. Use 0000 steel wool and remove the whiskers that raised on the stock. Always work in one direction. Work with the grain of the wood, never across the grain of the wood. Work against the whiskers not with the whiskers.
8. Make a 50/25/25 mix of the finish you plan to use (Linspeed, Truoil, Formby's tung oil, whatever you think will work), paint thinner, and the stain you plan to use. (50% finish, 25% thinner and 25%stain). The mix should be about the consistency of water. Add more thinner if necessary. Apply this liberally to your entire stock inside and out. Keep putting it on until the wood does not absorb any more.
9. Let this dry at least 48 hours.
10. Get one of those large pink pencil erasures. They're about 1/4" by 1" by 2". Get some 600 grit wet dry paper. Cut pieces of the paper to wrap around the erasure to make a sanding pad. Now make some 75/25 mix of finish and stain and dip the sanding pad into the mix and gently, very gently begin sanding the stock. You will be sanding down to the wood but not through the finish that has soaked into the wood. Do a section at a time. Change your sand paper often. You will work up a slurry. This slurry of dried finish and wood dust will fill any open pores. Take cheap napkins, ones that don't absorb well (optionally you could use a piece of burlap) and wiping in a single direction, wipe the slurry off of the section of the stock that you just sanded. The object is to push the slurry into any open pores and remove any excess finish. Do this to the rest of the stock.
11. Allow the stock to dry 24 to 48 hours as necessary. The stock is not necessarily pretty at this point.
12. If there are still open pores (and I would expect there to be some at this point) go back to step 10 and do it again. Keep doing this until the pores in the wood are filled even with the top of the wood. Usually 2 sessions are enough. Make sure you allow enough drying time between coats.
13. Get a piece of flannel from an old flannel shirt and a pair of panty hose. Cut a piece of flannel so that you can roll it into a ball about half or two thirds the size of a golf ball. Now cut a piece of the panty hose and wrap a single layer of panty hose around the ball of flannel. Gather the loose ends of the piece of panty hose and put a rubber band on them to hold the ball tightly together. Let's call this ball a poupee.
14. Again using the sanding pad with 600 grit wet/dry --- quickly wet sand the entire stock (note the entire stock not just a section) using the 75/25 mix. You should be sanding very lightly but still sanding down to the wood. You need very little sanding at this point.
15. Now immediately while the stock is still wet, Dip the poupee into the 75/25 mix and wipe the stock in a single direction. Always work from the drier area to the wet. Long strokes are better than short. If the stock has somewhat dried in an area, you will be able to re-wet it with the poupee. The stock should be looking pretty good about now.
16. Allow the stock to dry.
17. Do steps 14 through 16 as many times as you like until you get the desired results. Usually 2 or 3 is enough.
18. The stock may be very glossy at this point even though you chose a satin finishing material. If you want a satin finish then do the following working on a very dry stock. Get some Rottenstone available at hardware and paint stores. It is a fine white powder used in finishing furniture. Get a piece of felt and wrap it around an erasure. Dip the felt into some of the Rottenstone and gently, very gently --- go over the entire surface of the stock. This will give a satin finish. Before you do this to the entire stock -- try this on a small piece so you can see how this stuff works. It cuts quickly.
19. Enjoy your stock work.
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  #5  
Old 01-12-2004, 08:07 AM
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I use ZAR to remove finish. When it starts to lift the finish up, I use the flat side of a hacksaw blade to scrape it off and also take out small scratches at the same time. Reapply until all finish is removed. Whiskering will normally take just a time or two on a previously finished pc of wood and I always use paper as wool fibers tend to trap themselves under the grain and turn color under the finish with time, causing little red rust colored spots. Some folks use wool without a prob or take the time to really ck that there are no fibers trapped; I'm too lazy for that. If wood has real bad places in it, I use 150 grit to start. I stop at 400 grit with all sanding marks removed. If wood is torn or fibers cut, repair can be made with Famowood filler, sanded and spots stained to resemble wood in that area. I normally do not stain walnut as it tends to discolor the mineral streaking. When ready for sealer, I use Laurel Mtn from Brownells and apply all the wood will soak up, esp at the tip and butt. Let dry overnite and reapply. Let dry overnite. Wet sand smoothe with 400 grit using the sealer as a wetting agent. Let dry overnite. I then apply Brownells Custom Oil in a Satin finish spray about 3 or 4 times without sanding or rubbing out (only once to the inletting) letting dry at least 8hrs between coats. I then use Brownells "Tripple F" rubbing compound to get a dead flat surface. If needed, reapply Oil Finish untill you can rub out and entire surface is dead flat with no shiney spots. This will give a great satin finish and can also be polished up to a gloss with the "Five F" rubbing compound. This type of finish will give an "in the wood" coupled with a protective poly "top finish" that my customers really appreciate and is less effected by moisture or humidity than anything I have ever used. Good luck,

www.martincustom.com
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Old 01-12-2004, 11:37 AM
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With all due repect to Browing52 and the others, I'm really lazy and am into "Instant Gratification." Nothing they said is wrong, just more work than I care to do.

I used a small hand sander to take a stock down to natural wood, and used some steel wool to finish it. I did use the steam iron and wet cloth on a big ding. Then I put about 4 coats of Tru Oil on it giving me a nice light color finish.

I did this on my Savage110 3006 and everytime I have it on the range it draws a lot of nice comments.

Good shooting,
Steve
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  #7  
Old 01-12-2004, 04:03 PM
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Just use some spray stripper from walmart it will save you alot of sanding,then steam the dents like was suggested above.Then use some black or grey sandpaper not the brown ,it will give a much smoother finish.Use 220 until you get it the way you want it and then go over it with some 320 to finish up,if you go any finer with sandpaper you will burnish the wood and it wont take an oil finish very good.

The woodburst stains are tung oil based stains and work real good with tung oil you can get them at www.woodburst.com or woodcraft.They are very high quality stains,alot better than the minwax you find at walmart.

Now for the finish
Get some 0000 steel wool, a can of naphtha, not paint thinner, and a bottle of pure tung oil, not Formbyís or anyone elseís tung oil finish, these finishes have at most 20% real tung oil and some have 0%.They are all half naphtha or thinner so mix your own and save some money and have a superior finish.
The first two coats Thin 50% with naphtha and let penetrate 20 minutes. Now wipe the whole stock off with a clean soft t shirt rag .Wipe all excess off, even if it looks nice and glossy and you think a thick coat will be nice donít leave it, wipe it off good but donít scrub .If you leave it on thick it will dry into a dull paste, it can be rubbed off but its best to avoid it. Let dry overnight between all coats. Apply all coats except the last one with 0000 steel wool. You will understand why when you do it, it shaves the last remaining raised grain or sanding scratches the sandpaper didnít get and roughs up the last coat you applied. After the first two thinned coats use the tung oil straight. Its thick stuff so once you get it coated wipe it down real good. I apply about 5 or 6 coats all together. Let the last coat dry a few days and get a clean t shirt rag out and hand rub the stock real good turning your rag and keeping the polishing surface of the rag clean. This is the step everyone forgets, thatís the reason itís called a hand rubbed oil finish. It will bring out a deep luster satin finish that looks like fine furniture if you have nice wood. If its too glossy for you, it shouldnít be, but if it is just hit it lightly with a piece of 0000 wool and it will knock the entire luster down to almost nothing.
This all sounds like a lot of work, I guess it is but since itís spread out over a week or so its not a big deal.

Here are the places I get my supplies so you donít have to hunt all over for them.

naphtha -Wal-Mart
Tal-strip paint remover-Advance or AutoZone
Sandpaper, wood bleach, tsp-Lowes
Pure tung oil-woodcraft store if you have one locally or their site is
WWW.Woodcraft.com if you have to order. Here is a cheaper place. http://woodfinishingsupplies.com/Varnishes.htm I havenít ordered from them but itís definitely cheaper than Woodcraft.

Good luck
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  #8  
Old 01-12-2004, 05:30 PM
chola

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steaming out dings

can someone please explain how to do this,and roughly how long it takes
Thanks
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Old 01-12-2004, 05:53 PM
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some people use a wet wash rag and an iron i have heard of someone using a cappucino maker .Might be a pretty good way and you can get one at goodwill dirt cheap.I have also heard of people putting the whole stock in the dishwasher and it raised all the dents and cleaned all junk out of it.just dont let it run on the dry cycle.
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