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  #16  
Old 07-17-2013, 11:16 AM
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Those butthooks on the Anschutz and DV Buttplate are mainly an aid in offhand, cantilevering the heavy-barreled rifle between palm and armpit.
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  #17  
Old 07-18-2013, 12:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Smalser View Post
Those butthooks on the Anschutz and DV Buttplate are mainly an aid in offhand, cantilevering the heavy-barreled rifle between palm and armpit.
Ah! Thanks, never would have thought of that, but makes perfect sense now you've explained it. Always wondered about the pics of the funky buttplates on the old schuetzen rifles, now it all comes clear.
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  #18  
Old 11-18-2013, 07:37 PM
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After a few months of use, the (relatively inexpensive) Kimbers modified for position use arenít very popular, nor do the youngsters shoot them as well as the most popular rifle, the (very expensive) Anschutz 2013. Analyzing why, although the Kimber is almost two pounds lighter, it isnít balanced as well, being rather severely muzzle heavy.



Testing the available Annies on a fulcrum, the 2013 and also the 54 and 1413 balance right at the barrel end of the receiver ring, while the Kimberís balance point is an inch and a half further forward.



So Iíll adjust the rifleís balance using some lead in the butt, first measuring how much I need to achieve the balance point Iím looking forÖ



Öthen adding around a half ingot more. While I have it apart, this is a good point to steam out that ugly scratch and clean up and protect the stock with some topcoats of finish. When Iím done, Iíll reassemble the rifle and drill out the excess lead to achieve the balance point Iím looking for.
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  #19  
Old 02-16-2014, 08:12 PM
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The bit of history on the 82G filled in part of what I've been looking for over the last umpteen years. (Still missing the "why" they were never issued.) Mine shoots far better than I can, and it teaches me something every time I take it out. These old bones can't do 4 position any longer, but still --

Last edited by ghrit; 02-18-2014 at 12:16 PM.
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  #20  
Old 06-28-2014, 12:11 PM
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Bob,

What rear iris are you using on your Kimbers? I just received a NIB Kimber 82G
and one thing I can see right now is the rear iris may not work for me. It seems the
opening is too small. I should finish cleaning it today and hopefully get to the range
tomorrow to sight it in.

Gene
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  #21  
Old 06-28-2014, 12:33 PM
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The opening should be small; standard size for a fixed hole eyepiece is about 1.1mm. The aperture isn't just there to centre your eye, the small size elongates and narrows your focus, to help you see the foresight sharply, which is vital to aiming accurately. Increase the aperture too much and you lose this critical focus.

Too small can be a problem as the sight picture becomes too dark, but unless you are shooting in poor light (like on dimly lit indoor ranges, or in very cloudy weather) it's rare to see apertures much over the standard size.
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  #22  
Old 06-28-2014, 12:43 PM
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Tim,

Thanks for the reply. Guess my older eyes need a little more light. You are
right, in good light it isn't a problem. At the indoor range it is a problem. I was
thinking of one of the Anshcutz or Gehman rear irises with 1.5 magnifiers. But
perhaps I will shoot this first and see how it goes.

Gene
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  #23  
Old 06-28-2014, 01:38 PM
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Gene,

light is important, in that a dark sight picture is not desirable. However as we age, our ability to change our focal distance deteriorates. Opening up the aperture can make your focus too short to have a nice sharp foresight. An article in the British NRA journal recommended a slightly tighter than standard iris for older eyes.

The magnifying dioptres are useful, as they allow the focal length to be tailored to the individual, as well as making the target appear larger. Although they won't correct for astigmatism.
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