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  #16  
Old 04-13-2018, 08:28 AM
minuteshaver

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Avoid that Hodgdon magazine, material is screwy and they messed it up a few years ago by eliminating the starting loads in it.

due to the variations between manuals, and between cartridges its not funny.
A lot of load data for example 5.56 and .223 really screws with people and their concept of which is witch.
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  #17  
Old 04-13-2018, 09:43 AM
dgeesaman

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Originally Posted by STBE Harris View Post
Like has been mentioned if you have several rifles and pistols it is good to have several manuals and there can be great differences in what the manuals say are the maximum loads. ...
STBE
All good reasons, thanks. I didnít intend to sound like a doubter. By comparison my hand loading is extremely narrow and specific so my manuals are getting limited use at the moment.

I fully agree with safety aspects.
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  #18  
Old 04-13-2018, 10:57 AM
rc.

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Lots of good ones. You can pick up RCBS 12 and 13 pretty cheap on the used market. Not a big fan of #14s layout. Didn't care for 11 or 10 due to age of data but these do have "hotter" loads.

Lyman's 48 and 49 are excellent even though I don't use their tools. If you mostly load pistol they also have a "pistol and revolver" manual. I like that lyman bolds the loads producing the best accuracy. Usually these powder choices are great choices in a caliber.

There are others like barns you may need for all copper data and if you like Hornady bullets which are the best deal going these days, their manual may be a good choice. I keep a lot of the free powder pamphlet books around as well but you don't see these much anymore. Most of the ones I have are from the mid 90s to early 2000s. Now the information tends to be online.

You can't always find the load data you want in every book so having several sources helps and knowing general tricks like using #9 data for 4100 in magnum pistol.

Another great source of information is handloads.com but you should verify data before using a particular load published by people there. I like to research what has worked for other guys before picking a load. rc
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  #19  
Old 04-13-2018, 11:22 AM
doubs43
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You're not new to reloading so you're likely well versed in the basics. With that in mind, here are the top three manuals that I'd consider if I were you. I have all three plus others but these are the best IMO. (One quibble I have with Nosler is they don't list a trim-to-length for the cases as other manuals do. They should.)

Sierra
Lyman 50th
Nosler

The new Lyman manual is excellent IMO. They used to be rather conservative with their max loads but seem to be more in line with other manuals now. Their basic reloading "how to" information may be the best of all manuals.
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  #20  
Old 04-13-2018, 11:32 AM
Squeezer
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Pick your bullets, then pick your manuals

Quote:
Originally Posted by doubs43 View Post
You're not new to reloading so you're likely well versed in the basics. With that in mind, here are the top three manuals that I'd consider if I were you. I have all three plus others but these are the best IMO. (One quibble I have with Nosler is they don't list a trim-to-length for the cases as other manuals do. They should.)

Sierra
Lyman 50th
Nosler

The new Lyman manual is excellent IMO. They used to be rather conservative with their max loads but seem to be more in line with other manuals now. Their basic reloading "how to" information may be the best of all manuals.
I use Sierra, Speer, and Nosler bullets, so I would add the Speer #14 manual to your excellent list. Lyman #50 is an excellent cross-check for all three bullet lines, and provides numerous helpful articles on case conditioning etc. (John Haviland).
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  #21  
Old 02-24-2019, 07:44 AM
gunsmith10367

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Loading manuals............

I've been reloading for more than 40 yrs. and in that time have purchased several loading manuals, as the cost has increased I no longer do so. I have made caliber dedicated ring binders for each caliber that I load for, into these binders goes data that I have copied from manuals that I borrow from shooting buddies. I also include data from other sources and targets from load development range sessions, SAAMI drawings and anything else pertinent.
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  #22  
Old 02-24-2019, 08:47 AM
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I usually add to my library as each new edition comes out. Keeps up with new powders and projectiles. And I never toss the old ones.
If you don't like the print versions, what about considering loaddata.com The price is around that of one of the books and includes something over 300,000 loads currently.
And if you really like to play, there's QuickLOAD to add some variety.
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  #23  
Old 02-24-2019, 09:38 AM
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Load data is available online from the powder companies via online manuals. These are NOT sites of "my pet load" but factory workups. Nosier also has their load data online and I believe that Sierra does also. Hornady does not, Steve I guess, likes to be in the book business.

http://www.westernpowders.com/

http://www.alliantpowder.com/

https://www.hodgdonreloading.com/

https://load-data.nosler.com/
Nosler also has a forum

A beginning. I used to have at least 10 running feet of shelves that contained printed reloading books, that is down to a manageable 4 foot. Two are the Lyman books, 17 and 49th.
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  #24  
Old 02-26-2019, 07:12 PM
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I have looked though manuals at my local toy store and decided I really did not need to spend the money for a manual for information I find on-line from several reliable sources. All I want/look for anyway, is a starting point for the cartridge, bullet weight and powder I am working on, then tailor the round for my particular rifle. I load for several calibers and for me it is well worth the time to make the loads the best loads that I can build for each.
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  #25  
Old 02-27-2019, 06:41 AM
Samuel_Hoggson
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In most of his "Pet Loads" articles Ken Waters included measurements of case capacity for various brass mfgs for each cartridge. I wish even one loading manual would do likewise. Best is Nosler here, but they only give capacity of brass they're using for their testing.

IME, internal capacity (correlates somewhat with brass weight) accounts for more variation in loading data than primer change or particular powder lot #. Here's my .300 WBY data:

Primed brass wt:
RP .300 WBY 265 gr
WBY (early '70s) 228 gr
RP .300 Win 245 gr (just for comparison)

IMR 4350 weight needed to fill case:

RP .300 WBY 85 gr
WBY (early '70s) 93 gr
RP .300 Win 83 gr

So when loading .300 WBY it's as if I'm loading for two different cartridges. Same happens with .308/7.62x51, of course, but most people know this.

Anyway, back to the original question. I try to have as many manuals as possible so to match components and get closer to a sensible starting load on the first try. Use the online Alliant/Hodgdon data, too. Point is this: try NOT to rely on one source for anything. When one source is all I have, am apt to get seriously conservative with starting loads.
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  #26  
Old 03-02-2019, 02:42 AM
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I NEVER use powder brand manuals. The two that have served me all my life are Sierra and Lyman. I keep those two manuals up to date in my house. In the back of the Lyman manual, you can look up rifle brands by caliber, and it lists the twist rates. So much more info in that manual, but some great loads from the Lyman as well, thats why I still use both.
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  #27  
Old 03-11-2019, 07:39 AM
forrest r

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gizzy View Post
I NEVER use powder brand manuals. The two that have served me all my life are Sierra and Lyman. I keep those two manuals up to date in my house. In the back of the Lyman manual, you can look up rifle brands by caliber, and it lists the twist rates. So much more info in that manual, but some great loads from the Lyman as well, thats why I still use both.
I don't blame you, they only sell the stuff & don't have a clue as to what it is capable of.
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  #28  
Old 03-11-2019, 04:15 PM
jambuster
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My go-to is the Speer and Sierra manual. To me they have the best technical information for ecperienced reloaders. I think the Lyman manual is the best one for new loaders.( I am not a fan of their equipment ) ." Pet Loads" is still a very valuable resource because most of the powders , bullets , and primers are still available today and there are many techniques described to get an accurate load.An example : I was having only fair accuracy with my 25-06 . Ken Waters had similar issues with his and tried magnum primers with great success.
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