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Old 03-01-2019, 07:38 PM
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cut your own wood blanks



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I saw a thread on here where a fellow made his own blank, which was very nice indeed, and sent it to Richard's to have them make a stock.

This got me thinking. I have some black cherry and locust trees to drop here at my place. It would be neat to make a stock from a tree I felled myself.

Has anyone done this? Any suggestions.

From the Richard's Microfit FAQ site:

"Can I send you a piece of wood to have cut into a stock in one of your styles?
Yes, we can cut your wood into any one of our stock style's. The dimensions of the blank need to be as follows: Minimum 32" long, Minimum of 6" wide at the butt, 2" wide at the forearm, and 2" thick. This is the absolute minimium size to produce a stock from it. A normal size blank would measure 34" Long, 6 1/2" wide at the butt, 2 1/2" wide at the forearm, and 2 1/2" thick. Please note: If your blank measures 2 1/4" thick, there may be a few flat spots on the stock but can be rasped out and still be shaped normally by the customer."
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Old 03-02-2019, 08:44 AM
RCP Phx

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That was my thread, do you have any particular questions?
BTW, that is Zebrawood/Morado/Bloodwood/Morado/Zebrawood


Last edited by RCP Phx; 03-02-2019 at 08:55 AM.
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:11 AM
GH41

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My question... If you harvest your own tree.. How many years does it take before the slab is dry/stable enough to use. I assume it would depend on where you live. In my case (year round humidity between 75 and 100%) it would probably never stabilize. Is that the reason you laminated the stock?
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:22 AM
Donnie Powell
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Take it to a kiln.
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:29 AM
RCP Phx

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Quote:
Originally Posted by GH41 View Post
My question... If you harvest your own tree.. How many years does it take before the slab is dry/stable enough to use. I assume it would depend on where you live. In my case (year round humidity between 75 and 100%) it would probably never stabilize. Is that the reason you laminated the stock?
I did not "harvest" any wood, it was purchased from Az's best wood shop that has a "humidity controlled" environment for all their fine woods. The reason for the laminate was strictly for the beauty of the combined woods!
BTW, I'm still not done with this stock as I'm looking for Show quality finish. Right now I've got 20 coats of tung oil and have sanded each coat with it being at #2500 right now. The finish has incredible luster with all the wood showing their best color.

Last edited by RCP Phx; 03-02-2019 at 09:38 AM.
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Old 03-02-2019, 12:03 PM
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Harvest some wood? I'll have to try that saying that the next time the BLM people are chasing me. Don't believe in clear cutting, but I don't see any thing wrong with taking diseased, blow overs, rotted, widow makers, or stuff blocking roads that are worthy of making stocks from.
As soon as your blank is cut - seal the ends (anchor seal is what we use)! Air drying is slow and stable but bugs are always after it. Kiln's are awesome and a huge learning curve but you will be using one more then you ever thought. Living 10 minutes to Lake Pacific requires multiple trips to the kiln during shaping and finishing if the final destination is a dry places like NV, AZ, NM, and Texas. I'm no pro by any means, just learned every thing the hard way! BLM will take all your possessions including vehicles if caught cutting on their property.
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Old 03-02-2019, 05:40 PM
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That stock is a beaut, RCP.

So I guess for process, I'll buck up some trees, then I can take it to a nearby saw mill and have them rough cut it to the dimensions, and put it in their kiln.

I'll talk with Richard's, but I wonder if I'll have to sand the blank down? Yours looked almost polished. Do you know if the "sides" of the blank became visible sides of the stock, or is the whole stock from "deeper" wood in the blank?

How did they do the caps? I love the way they look on yours. Was that from the wood layer in the center of your blank or something added after the fact?

Thanks!
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Old 03-02-2019, 06:54 PM
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M17hm2-I did the exact same thing that you're thinking of. I had a log that came from my grandpas farm sawn at a sawmill. Sealed the ends & dried it in my shed for two years & sent it to Richards Microfit. It came back nicely inletted but the outside was very rough & required lost of sanding & finish work. I was ok with that. I can sand but I can't inlet. Turned out great. Now I have a beautiful & sentimental stock. By the way, the crotch part of a tree(where it forks) is where the prettiest swirly grain is at. Hope this helps.
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Old 03-02-2019, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Bwanger View Post
M17hm2-I did the exact same thing that you're thinking of. I had a log that came from my grandpas farm sawn at a sawmill. Sealed the ends & dried it in my shed for two years & sent it to Richards Microfit. It came back nicely inletted but the outside was very rough & required lost of sanding & finish work. I was ok with that. I can sand but I can't inlet. Turned out great. Now I have a beautiful & sentimental stock. By the way, the crotch part of a tree(where it forks) is where the prettiest swirly grain is at. Hope this helps.
Excellent info. Thank you.

What did you seal it with, by the way?
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Old 03-02-2019, 08:19 PM
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I can't remember what the professional stuff you're supposed to use is, but I think I just used pruning sealer because that's what I had. It worked fine. I think you can use paint also.
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Old 03-03-2019, 08:04 AM
GH41

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This article answers most of the questions raised here>>> https://www.wood-database.com/wood-a...-wood-at-home/
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Old 03-09-2019, 02:40 PM
azguy
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When you cut your wood blanks from the green tree, be sure to cut blanks 3 to 4” thick. I tend to cut 4” thick pieces that the actual blanks will be cut from. Coat the open grain the ends with paraffin wax. Let air dry for a couple years at least. The thick “first” cut is in case of surface checking and cracks. After getting to say 15 % moisture, trim closer to your desired blank thickness. Also the best blanks almost always come from 2-4 feet under the ground to a couple feet above the ground. Take your time and hopefully you’ll get a couple decent blanks. Good luck!
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Old 03-09-2019, 04:15 PM
profsrgary

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donnie Powell View Post
Take it to a kiln.
Yes, Yes, Yes! And quarter slice it instead of plain slice. This will make your wood more stable. Radial sawing produces the most stable cut but takes away form the appearance.

Last edited by profsrgary; 03-09-2019 at 04:18 PM.
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Old 03-09-2019, 07:06 PM
azguy
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Beg to differ in opinion. Rift, or flat sawn, on a decently figured stock blanks exposes more of the grain lines to being opened up. While quarter sawn is inherently more stable, due to a more consistent grain structure from side to side, it can be somewhat plain in appearance. It really depends on the blank and grain structure, as well as degree of mineralization in the grain. Spalt and burl can also play into what is “best” in a given situation. If the log is laid out correctly you’ll get a bit of both, when you cut it up. As for stability? As long as the wood is dry and not kiln dried too hot, which can lead to internal stresses, any way you cut it, have fun!
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