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Old 04-29-2019, 06:13 PM
cladd
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Wind Flag Placement



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In shooting rimfire ARA 50 yard competition what is the ideal placement for wind flags - I have 3 flags I will be using. The most important flag is the one closest to the bench or the target?

For a 25 yard target is one flag enough?

Thanks much!
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:48 PM
swo1
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I also shot ARA, PSL, and IR50 comps. For me it depends on the range. I have five flags and two wind probes. Mostly I set one flag at around 5-7 yards out, one at 15, one at 20 one at 30 and one at 40. The two probes go at 20 and 30. Some ranges I only use 4 flags and the two probes. Each rifle/ammo seems to react a little different than others. At larger shots with 20+ shooters I think you will notice flags at all different postitions. Get to know your flags and what has the most bearing on you, your rifle and ammo. Biggest factor is not paying attention to other flags around you, lanes to the left and right. All brands react different in the same wind. Get to know your flags and dont pay attention to others. Its hard to do at meets with what I call flag clutter.

Bottom line is shoot over yours for all practice and trust them, oh and by the way they LIE. Good Luck
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Old 04-29-2019, 07:10 PM
Rick H.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swo1 View Post
I also shot ARA, PSL, and IR50 comps. For me it depends on the range. I have five flags and two wind probes. Mostly I set one flag at around 5-7 yards out, one at 15, one at 20 one at 30 and one at 40. The two probes go at 20 and 30. Some ranges I only use 4 flags and the two probes. Each rifle/ammo seems to react a little different than others. At larger shots with 20+ shooters I think you will notice flags at all different postitions. Get to know your flags and what has the most bearing on you, your rifle and ammo. Biggest factor is not paying attention to other flags around you, lanes to the left and right. All brands react different in the same wind. Get to know your flags and dont pay attention to others. Its hard to do at meets with what I call flag clutter.

Bottom line is shoot over yours for all practice and trust them, oh and by the way they LIE. Good Luck
Boy if that isn't the absolute truth! Sometimes I have to wonder how guys can tell which flags are theirs or someone else's. It can even get to looking like a carnival at times.

Rick H.
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Old 04-30-2019, 06:21 AM
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Originally Posted by cladd View Post
In shooting rimfire ARA 50 yard competition what is the ideal placement for wind flags - I have 3 flags I will be using. The most important flag is the one closest to the bench or the target?

For a 25 yard target is one flag enough?

Thanks much!
In a broad answer they are all important but depending on the day and range you are shooting, even down to the bench draw, you may notice that one flag or section of flags have more bearing on what's going on than another flag or other flags. I don't know about 25 yard shooting but at 50 yards three flags are a good starting point on learning how to read them. When you start feeling confidence in reading those add 2 more to your spread and you will fill in the majority of the gaps that you feel are left out with just 3 flags. If it were me, I would say place the first flag at about 5 yards, the second at about 15-20 yards and then the third flag somewhere between 35-50 yards out. I would just judge the last flag placement based on where most of the other competitors are placing theirs in the biggest concentration of that range of distance that day or if you notice some sort of unique feature to the range place it in front of that in your lane. What I mean by unique feature is something like if the range has a row of trees up one side but there is an access road through the trees creating a tunnel for wind to come through. Most ranges have some sort of feature like this and it can create havoc if you can't tell why or what is going on. A lot of times it still creates havoc when you think you can see what's going on and it just takes shooting at that range to figure it out. Good luck with you shooting.

Tad
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Old 04-30-2019, 09:30 AM
wmrike

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The most critical flag is the one closest to the firing line. Wind near the firing line impacts the bullet's entire flight. In the simplest scenario, where the wind is steady and there are no berms, trees, and bushes to disrupt the wind, an astute shooter could get by with that one flag. We are rarely so lucky.

A variable or gusty wind asks for more flags, as do any obstacles to the wind's path. My home range has berms and plays havoc with even the slightest cross currents.

Reading the wind is a very high art. Until you acquire a passing knowledge of how to deal with wind, I would suggest not using more than two or three. Without the acquired skillset to deal with wind, too many flags can just lead to confusion.

Good shooting and have fun!
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Old 04-30-2019, 10:03 AM
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We tend to have a short firing line with all of us in the same conditions so I tend to use the flags of others if they are put out.
I like 3, one close, one about 1/3 out and the other near the targets.
As well as the sound of the wind through the trees, the touch of breeze on my face or neck, watching the leaves, etc. If you get the idea we are in a valley boxed in by trees with switchy winds and thermals along with mirage, you've got it.
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Old 04-30-2019, 10:44 AM
cladd
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Thanks for all the tips!
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Old 04-30-2019, 11:21 AM
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For sure the close wind has the greatest effect. Starting out I would set all three in the first 20-25 yds. If you nail your condition 100% what happens on past that isn't going to hurt you. Later on you might want more flags or stretch them out.
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Old 04-30-2019, 03:36 PM
HAWKEYE WIZARD
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You might find it interesting to read the stickie above titled THE ENEMY OF MY ENEMY IS MY FRIEND.
Hawkeye Wizard
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Old 05-02-2019, 06:26 AM
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Flag Placement

You will do just fine with your three flags. Place your closest flag five paces from your bench. The second flag will be placed at 25 yards. And the third flag will be placed placed approximately three paces nearest the target. Stand at the target facing your bench and eye a line from where you are standing to approximately two feet of either side of your bench. (If you are left handed it will be to the left of the bench, if you are right handed it will be to the right of the bench). The 'target flag' should be offset from the target depending on being right handed or left handed. Place it to the left if you are left handed, same for right handed.

Your flags will be 'stacked' in a straight line starting from the closest to the farthest. Your non aiming eye will be able to see all of them in action at any time. There are some ranges that will have elevation changes from the bench to the target. You can adjust your stand to accommodate for those variances.

You will become very adept at setting your flags once you get the hang of it.
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Old 05-02-2019, 07:09 AM
David Valdina
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Which side of the bench ?

Maybe I did it wrong, but I am right handed and put my flags out to the left of the bench, ever so slightly angled into the target, so my left eye could pick up the motion of all the flags at the same time I was seeing the target with my right eye. I would often shoot with both eyes open. Then again, I was only a contender, never a champion at the sport.
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Old 05-02-2019, 07:58 AM
Hi-NV Shooter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Valdina View Post
Maybe I did it wrong, but I am right handed and put my flags out to the left of the bench, ever so slightly angled into the target, so my left eye could pick up the motion of all the flags at the same time I was seeing the target with my right eye. I would often shoot with both eyes open. Then again, I was only a contender, never a champion at the sport.
I do the same(both eyes open), but have been trying more and more to not be looking thru the scope when I shoot, rather I am looking at my flags and wind indicator. so my head is up, seems to make it easier to read what is going on.

I also place my flags so they are just below the bullets flight path, my belief I am getting a much more true reading of the condition. and not a before or after effect.

I adjust the height of my flags so they are about 10-12" below the bore centerline.
haven't shot any of my flags yet

Lee
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Old 05-02-2019, 10:30 AM
kseatm
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Originally Posted by Hi-NV Shooter View Post
I do the same(both eyes open), but have been trying more and more to not be looking thru the scope when I shoot, rather I am looking at my flags and wind indicator. so my head is up, seems to make it easier to read what is going on.

I also place my flags so they are just below the bullets flight path, my belief I am getting a much more true reading of the condition. and not a before or after effect.

I adjust the height of my flags so they are about 10-12" below the bore centerline.
haven't shot any of my flags yet

Lee
I agree with this.

Kenny
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Old 05-08-2019, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Hi-NV Shooter View Post
I do the same(both eyes open), but have been trying more and more to not be looking thru the scope when I shoot, rather I am looking at my flags and wind indicator. so my head is up, seems to make it easier to read what is going on.

I also place my flags so they are just below the bullets flight path, my belief I am getting a much more true reading of the condition. and not a before or after effect.

I adjust the height of my flags so they are about 10-12" below the bore centerline.
haven't shot any of my flags yet

Lee
Lee I set a wind indicator up once thinking it was just below where I could see it in the scope
It was close to my bench, problem was I was shooting right through it when it was swinging into the position the bullets were going
Couldn't for the life of me work out why the gun was shooting so poorly
The top of the wind indicator was a four inch foam ball painted bright red

I shot that sucker 24 times and then got onto my gunsmith on the phone and told him that there was something really wrong with my gun

My mates could see what was going on and just said nothing and laughed and laughed they were actually crying they were laughing so much, especially when I rang my gunsmith.

Who doesn't need mates like that?

For years I looked through that scope at every shot but like many here I just look at the flags and probes now and its way better
Lee I had a mate line me up at a night shoot and he had me put the front flag to high so I tried to shot at the bottom line of targets even though I could see the flag swapping quicky
Yeah I hit that sucker twice

Last edited by Thejet; 05-08-2019 at 04:43 PM.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:57 PM
kseatm
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Ben, you crack me up.

Here's a tip for anyone just getting into this. When you go to a match, especially a big match, nobody really cares about you. Some will put their windflags where they want them. They may be in your way, they may be in your firing line.

If they are in your way, tell them to move them. Don't be intimidated as they will leave them there if you let them. And if they are in your firing lane, get them to move the things.

This goes back to something posted earlier. Use your flags. You will know them better than by going by some else's flags. Of course you should look upstream to see what's coming, but rely on what your flags tell you.

An example of what I'm talking about. Me and a buddy were at what most might consider a huge match. A very very big name shooter was on the bench next to us. He had his flags set out and they were in our firing line. My friend and I agreed that if he didn't mind, we'd just use his flags as he was on a different relay than us. He said it was fine with him. Unfortunately, we didn't realize that when he was finished his relay, he picked his flags up and moved them.

Not only were we not using the flags we were comfortable with, we then didn't have any flags at all to go by when our relay came up.

If you're going to get into this, buy good flags. The good ones are expensive. Put them where you are comfortable with. This might be to the right, to the left or down the center of your firing line. Wherever you put them, make sure you don't shoot them! Then get to know what they are saying. Don't go by what the guy next to you has out. You should know what your flags say, so go by that. But, do look upstream so that you can see what's coming.

Also, if you're looking through the scope when you pull the trigger, you may end up cursing yourself sometimes. But then, I know some very good shooters who do it that way. I prefer to be looking at the conditions when I touch the trigger. Gave away two very big matches because I got too focused on looking through the scope when I touched the trigger. Wanted to see the glory of my abilities and only saw a wind switch as I touched the trigger. Wind switches don't lead to glory.

JMO Do as you wish.

Kenny
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