Gun stock out of Dogwood? - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > >

Notices

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-28-2010, 06:37 PM
BobforBass

Join Date: 
Nov 2005
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
23
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Gun stock out of Dogwood?



Log in to see fewer ads
I've read much about making your own gun stock. I love the different woods people use. I would like to try my hand at making my own stock. My question is: Can I use dogwood for the wood of the stock? My Dad's farm in Arkansas has a dogwood tree that died a couple years ago. The tree is very large for a dogwood. The trunk is just over 24" in diameter and from ground to first branch is just over 6'. The tree is still standing and I plan to dig it out and hopefully be able to save the root ball and maybe get some neat wood out of it. I have never worked w/ wood to carve so this is will be totally new. Any words of advice would be greatly appreciated. I also wouldn't be opposed to sending a stock blank to have a duplicator make a fingergoove if that would be possible.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-28-2010, 07:14 PM
Passinby's Avatar
Passinby

Join Date: 
Apr 2005
Location: 
Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 
7,612
TPC Rating: 
99% (69)
Send a message via Yahoo to Passinby
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobforBass View Post
I've read much about making your own gun stock. I love the different woods people use. I would like to try my hand at making my own stock. My question is: Can I use dogwood for the wood of the stock? My Dad's farm in Arkansas has a dogwood tree that died a couple years ago. The tree is very large for a dogwood. The trunk is just over 24" in diameter and from ground to first branch is just over 6'. The tree is still standing and I plan to dig it out and hopefully be able to save the root ball and maybe get some neat wood out of it. I have never worked w/ wood to carve so this is will be totally new. Any words of advice would be greatly appreciated. I also wouldn't be opposed to sending a stock blank to have a duplicator make a fingergoove if that would be possible.
Any blank you cut out would have to be dried before it could be worked. Air-dry takes 3-4 years depending on the climate.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-28-2010, 07:27 PM
duhast's Avatar
duhast
US Navy Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Aug 2010
Location: 
SoCal
Posts: 
700
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I'm no expert on wood, but I did a quick image search (there's not much) and it looks like it might be nice, some spalted, some with noticable figure to it.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #4  
Old 08-28-2010, 08:18 PM
Motor7
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jun 2009
Location: 
East Tennessee
Posts: 
1,876
TPC Rating: 
100% (2)
I have a portable sawmill & cut several different species of trees. Cut several blanks out and immediatly seal the ends with Anchorseal-
http://www.amazon.com/Anchorseal-Gre.../dp/B0013J1FYW

This stops the drying process from the cut ends which lessens the possibility of splitting/cracking. Some blanks will crack no matter what you do, so having a few to choose from is a good thing. Kiln drying first might be too fast for a stock blank and may promote cracking. A slow drying process is better, stack them inside your house this winter away from a direct heat source up on sticks(slats) spaced every 6-8", then put some weight on the top slab to keep the warping to a minimum.

After the winter is over I would then stick it in a Kiln. Check around the local lumber yards for one & most likely they will let you stick the blanks in there for free. The kiln owner will have a moisture meter & can tell you when you can turn those blanks into a stock. The further into the roots you go the better the "fiddle" grain texture will be.

RD
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-29-2010, 01:34 AM
drifterfisher
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Dec 2009
Location: 
close to the worlds whitest beaches
Posts: 
599
TPC Rating: 
100% (7)
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-29-2010, 06:04 AM
Keith55's Avatar
Keith55

Join Date: 
Nov 2003
Location: 
South Texas
Posts: 
1,337
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Wow, Motor7 !!!

That was a very informative post.
Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-29-2010, 07:10 AM
dbr65's Avatar
dbr65
US Navy Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Moderator
Join Date: 
Feb 2008
Location: 
Far Eastern PA
Posts: 
6,157
TPC Rating: 
100% (273)
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobforBass View Post
I've read much about making your own gun stock. I love the different woods people use. I would like to try my hand at making my own stock. My question is: Can I use dogwood for the wood of the stock? My Dad's farm in Arkansas has a dogwood tree that died a couple years ago. The tree is very large for a dogwood. The trunk is just over 24" in diameter and from ground to first branch is just over 6'. The tree is still standing and I plan to dig it out and hopefully be able to save the root ball and maybe get some neat wood out of it. I have never worked w/ wood to carve so this is will be totally new. Any words of advice would be greatly appreciated. I also wouldn't be opposed to sending a stock blank to have a duplicator make a fingergoove if that would be possible.
You just have to be very careful with dogwood in a stock. You don't want to leave any bark in it!

Doug
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-29-2010, 07:31 AM
varmit hunter67
US Army Veteran Law Enforcement Officer NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Feb 2008
Location: 
Lilburn, GA, near Stone Mtn.
Posts: 
4,393
TPC Rating: 
100% (1)
Dogwood has been used for the faces of golf clubs for years. it is a very hard durable wood. Not sure how it will work for a stock as it seems to check pretty bad. Been to many years since wood technology... if I can find my text book, I will see what else it said about the wood. Good luck! VH
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-29-2010, 08:14 AM
knightd

Join Date: 
May 2010
Posts: 
400
TPC Rating: 
100% (11)
We use dogwood for billets to flint knap with and it does check and split alot!! when it dries. But if you could get a clean piece for a stock it would be fairly light and hard as a rock..
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-29-2010, 05:03 PM
BobforBass

Join Date: 
Nov 2005
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
23
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Thanks for all the replies. I don't want the tree to go to waste. If I don't get the tree my Dad will just burn it in a brush pile.

I realize the wood must dry for an extended period of time. Again, the tree is still standing but died at least two years ago. How does that affect the drying time. I'm sure the drying time is longer since it is not a small piece of wood. Also, the weather has been very hot and very dry this summer in Arkansas.

The stock making will be new to me if I attemt to do it myself. As it is right now I don't have all the tools to do the inletting. I've searche quite a bit for items made of dogwood but most have been ink pens. I was hopeing I could find larger items showing some neat grain or spalting. If anyone has any pictures or links of such I would appreciate it. When I dig the tree up and bring it to my home I will take pics and ask more pointed questions.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-29-2010, 05:36 PM
Motor7
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jun 2009
Location: 
East Tennessee
Posts: 
1,876
TPC Rating: 
100% (2)
Standing dead for two years may mean it is bug infested & dry rotted. Go ahead and cut it up an see how the heartwood looks. The outer rings may be pulpy, but the center may still be good & that is what you want to cut the slabs out of. I have never used dogwood except for walking sticks, but it's worth a shot.
If not it's good once you cut it up use it for a bonfire....bring copious amounts of beer.

RD
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 09-04-2010, 01:35 PM
turmite
National Guard

Join Date: 
Jul 2010
Location: 
In the Foothills of the Ouachita Mtns
Posts: 
1,536
TPC Rating: 
100% (3)
Bob what part of Arkansas is the tree? I know people! Pm me your email address as I have a son in law in the business of timber work, a friend with a mill and another with a dry kiln.

The only time I have ever had experience with Dogwood was when one partially died at my mom's house. I cut the dead part off after about 3-4 years. All I got from it was some pencil and pen blanks due to my having waited too long to harvest and the wood seems to be prone to splitting during the drying process.

Let me know if I can help.

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 09-07-2010, 09:17 AM
BobforBass

Join Date: 
Nov 2005
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
23
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Dogwood

PM sent
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 09-07-2010, 09:43 PM
Ol' Harry
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Jul 2008
Location: 
Round Top, Texas
Posts: 
298
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
From the book Home Gunsmithing by John E. Traister, Chapter 18 "Stock Work", p. 243:

"Miscellaneous Woods: The common dogwood makes an excellent gunstock, but generally works badly due to the smallness of the tree."
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 09-08-2010, 10:17 AM
BobforBass

Join Date: 
Nov 2005
Location: 
Arkansas
Posts: 
23
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Generally

Thanks Ol'Harry!

However, in my case, the tree trunk is much larger than any other dogwoods I've seen. I'll be at my Dad's farm next weekend and will inspect the tree more closely to see if it is rotten, hollow or solid. I'll take pictures and post them so I can get more expert feedback. It's been a couple years since I've been up close so my measurements may be off a little but I don't think by much.

Bobforbass
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:29 PM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2021 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x