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Old 01-20-2018, 10:12 AM
nicezielklein

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Is There A Golden Era Of 10/22 Production ?



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Hi,
Was there a golden era of 10/22 production ? Were the materials and quality control better on the earlier examples.

Cheers
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Old 01-20-2018, 12:34 PM
rawhp
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Originally Posted by nicezielklein View Post
Hi,
Was there a golden era of 10/22 production ? Were the materials and quality control better on the earlier examples.

Cheers
I don't think there's a hard date, like with a Winchester model 70 (pre-64), since 10/22's seem to transition, and sometimes back and forth, overlapping years. But if I saw a pre-68 10/22 in good shape and a good price, I'd probably snap it up. Anodized receiver, walnut stock, and if it were a finger groove, I'd have my credit card out in less than a second, maybe faster if it were checkered.
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Old 01-20-2018, 12:52 PM
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yup, anything built after they quit making the fingergroove stock is, in varying degrees, less desirable in my opinion,...with some years being worse than others
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Old 01-20-2018, 04:37 PM
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I don't think there's a hard date, like with a Winchester model 70 (pre-64), since 10/22's seem to transition, and sometimes back and forth, overlapping years. But if I saw a pre-68 10/22 in good shape and a good price, I'd probably snap it up. Anodized receiver, walnut stock, and if it were a finger groove, I'd have my credit card out in less than a second, maybe faster if it were checkered.
rawhp, How long ago were the receivers anodized? How do they look? It is my understanding aluminum alloys formulated to cast are difficult to anodize with acceptable results. Ruger's bean counters probably figured out painting a cheaper alloy made the company more $$$ than anodizing a more expensive alloy.
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Old 01-20-2018, 05:40 PM
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Barrels got better around 2008 or so. Machining and receiver finish seems better on the older guns.
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Old 01-20-2018, 06:20 PM
rawhp
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rawhp, How long ago were the receivers anodized? How do they look? It is my understanding aluminum alloys formulated to cast are difficult to anodize with acceptable results. Ruger's bean counters probably figured out painting a cheaper alloy made the company more $$$ than anodizing a more expensive alloy.
There are certainly more knowledgeable Ruger historians on the forum, but I recall '70s vintage and before were anodized, with the transition occurring during the '80s with a few early '90s serial numbered receivers still showing up anodized if you were lucky. Things went down hill starting in the late '70s and early '80s when they switched from walnut to birch, and metal to plastic butt plates.

My receiver is from 1981, by serial number, and anodized (plastic butt plate, metal barrel band, birch stock). I think Ruger only applied regular anodizing, and not hard anodizing (higher voltage, thicker oxide layer), so it isn't that durable. Mine's worn through on the lower part of the receiver, but the metal finish is very smooth. This pic is taken with pretty bad lighting (used a flashlight to try to show the finish), but basically it looks like a fine brushed finish with a dark black coloring.

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Old 01-21-2018, 04:35 AM
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Early 10/22

My International built in 1966 or 1967 was a very good example of the breed. Trigger from the factory was quite reasonable. Fit and finish were solid. Accuracy was about all one can expect from a semi auto. Wish I still had it.
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Old 01-21-2018, 08:36 AM
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rawhp, How long ago were the receivers anodized? How do they look? It is my understanding aluminum alloys formulated to cast are difficult to anodize with acceptable results. Ruger's bean counters probably figured out painting a cheaper alloy made the company more $$$ than anodizing a more expensive alloy.
I think Sturm and Ruger both set out to manufacture as cheap as possible from the get go. Just look at their casting side gig, been casting and plastic injecting for long time.
I think the period between late 60s maybe into the very early 80s where maybe the peak. The wood and metal finish always looks better? But hey what do you want for -$250 rifle.
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Old 01-21-2018, 08:38 AM
sormi
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Find a AMT rifle. Looks like a Ruger but made of Stainless Steel.
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Old 01-21-2018, 09:06 AM
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I have a 1974 vintage 10-22. It has the walnut stock and steel butt-plate. No warning on the barrel either. It was a gun show find, sat on the table all Saturday and half of Sunday before I saw it. Got it for $100, vendor said nobody really was interested in it.
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Old 01-21-2018, 09:20 AM
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My 1974 10-22 has a walnut stock and aluminum buttplate. It did not shoot accurately in factory trim but by adding an aftermarket Volquartsen barrel and trigger it is my ‘no excuses’ squirrel rifle now.
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Old 01-21-2018, 09:35 AM
jon p
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Wink i had a 1976 200th anniv

I believe it was a walnut stock, and checkered if I remember correctly. cant remember the butt plate. LGS in stone mountain GA had a big pile of them new in boxes, on special for around 50.00. I never fired it, traded it off in the 1980s. kinda wish I had kept it !
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Old 01-21-2018, 10:19 AM
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I have rifles from the 70's, 80's, 90's, 2000s and post 2010s. Other than the plastic versus metal stuff and the walnut stock on the 70's rifles they are all about the same in quality. There was period in the 90s when Ruger was in financial trouble and they really cheaped out with their finishes (remember the crinkle paint?) and QC but my 90's rifle is pretty decent.
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Old 01-21-2018, 11:17 AM
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My 10/22 was made in 1997 & has the anodized receiver, it was originally the Target model.

It now has a GM 20" bull bbl. Kidd two stage trigger, JWH bolt & custom stock. I believe the only Ruger parts that are left are the receiver & magazine.
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Old 01-21-2018, 01:30 PM
Lee Sherman
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Ruger 10/22 Int. model.

I picked up a 1969 Ruger International model rifle several years ago. Anodized aluminum trigger group, steel Schnabel, perfect in every respect. Shoots and runs like a champ. It shoots far straighter than my 2008 Ruger carbine. The Mannlicher stock has a certain appeal to me that makes me cherish it even more. Life is good.
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