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  #16  
Old 12-28-2015, 08:52 AM
nhw

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You are almost describing how to create a convex edge. Try not gluing the sandpaper and use a phonebook or mouse pad under the sandpaper. I usually start with 600 grit and then 1000, 1500, 2000, 2500 and finish with 3000 grit. The edge you get is tough and very durable. I also use a leather strop with black then green rouge. You can get edges that will cleanly cut phone book paper strips. However not every knife is a candidate for a convex edge. It depends on how it was constructed. All Scandinavian knives can usually have convex edges.
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  #17  
Old 12-28-2015, 09:43 AM
sweetmk
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My wife wanted the kitchen knives sharpened,,, a dozen or so knives,,,
no hand stone will do that in my lifetime,,,

so,, after a few forum searches,, this is our answer,,,



The results are ridiculously accurate,, and faster than fast!!
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  #18  
Old 12-29-2015, 06:10 PM
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A belt sander with a large assortment of grits is a cool set up.
I have used them for years and sharpen as a small business,Does a scary sharp edge.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptspof6CXOg This a random video there are hours to watch.

R
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  #19  
Old 12-29-2015, 09:39 PM
alro41
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Speedy Sharp. Best and cheapest sharpener I've found. About $12. About 4" x 3/4", i.e. pocket size. Out of some small town in NW Wyoming. Sharpens just about anything that had an edge to begin with.
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  #20  
Old 12-31-2015, 02:29 AM
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When I use to enjoy sharpening chores and did it by hand I used the wet/dry sand paper with HEAVY plate glass. Worked fantastic but alas I became old and wanted to spend time doing other things (like shooting 22.s again LOL) so I went for the power method and haven't looked back.
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  #21  
Old 12-31-2015, 08:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alro41 View Post
Speedy Sharp. Best and cheapest sharpener I've found. About $12. About 4" x 3/4", i.e. pocket size. Out of some small town in NW Wyoming. Sharpens just about anything that had an edge to begin with.
I have a Speedy Sharp for fast edges in the field. The downside is how aggressive the carbide is and how fast it can change the edge angle - if not ruin it. Cora WY is the place you mention. I cowboyed there back in the early 50's. Near the small town of Pinedale WY which is on most maps while Cora isn't!
Happy New Year
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  #22  
Old 12-31-2015, 08:14 AM
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For a flat surface, I discovered you can often get scrap flat pieces of granite from the local supplier of headstones at little or no cost. Wet the granite and wet or dry paper will stick to it like glue and yet easy to change it out for different grits.
I also use the granite flat for leatherwork. Have 2-3 pieces for different needs. Most of the time you can get a piece of 12" scrap for nothing except digging through the scrap pile! A polite asking at the front desk is all it takes for me.
Happy New Year
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  #23  
Old 12-31-2015, 09:00 AM
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Not in the same league as these guys, but i use a vibrating multi tool. It does what i need
to sharpen a working knife
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  #24  
Old 02-23-2016, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by ferrarif1fan View Post
I use one of these. The Lansky sharpening system. It has different grit stones. The thing I like is that if you're careful, you sharpen at the same angle EVERY time. That means when you need to put a new edge on, you're not removing a lot of material. Just enough to get it back to a fine edge. One thing I'll mention about a polished edge...it is my opinion that this type of edge, while easy to shave with, will not last long on a pocket knife. I actually finish my edges with a medium-fine stone. This leaves the edge with a little "tooth" to it, which helps it cut a bit easier. I'd only use the fine stone for the final edge if I was sharpening a razor.

Do you need to know the angle to sharpen at from a website or is it kind of a guess?
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  #25  
Old 02-23-2016, 09:11 AM
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I use a medium sharpie marker to draw a thin line down the current cutting edge (also known as the "bright edge") then adjust my sharpening angle by watching where the sharpening material is removing the sharpie coating.

I use a fine grit stone in this initial step so the incorrect test-angles don't remove too much material in the wrong places, such as the rear of the bevel.

When your sharpening media is removing all the sharpie ink evenly across the bright edge, there's your original angle. It should only take a few light passes to find your original grind angle.
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  #26  
Old 04-03-2016, 10:30 AM
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I am a huge fan of both the Edge Pro and the Wicked Edge .Prior to owning them I was never very good at sharpening knives. These systems take most of the guesswork out of sharpening and with a little practice you get very professional results and more importantly you can get hair whittling edges. For some people these systems may seem a little expensive but you won't ruin your blades and the learning curve is very quick. Both systems are very versatile to boot
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  #27  
Old 04-03-2016, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by supersharp View Post
I am a huge fan of both the Edge Pro and the Wicked Edge .Prior to owning them I was never very good at sharpening knives. These systems take most of the guesswork out of sharpening and with a little practice you get very professional results and more importantly you can get hair whittling edges. For some people these systems may seem a little expensive but you won't ruin your blades and the learning curve is very quick. Both systems are very versatile to boot

Buddy from a board ( in another state) has that wicked edge. It seems real nice, but **** are they expensive.
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  #28  
Old 04-03-2016, 02:35 PM
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Speaking of convex edges:

An article many years ago in "Popular Science" described knife sharpening. Their contention was that when creating the edge, you should remove enough material to achieve something like a 22.5 degree angle. Then, for the final edge, you should make that "tip of the edge" be double that first angle.

In other words, the final polish, at the tip of the edge, should be a more blunt angle.

That makes the edge stronger and less likely to fold over, and also causes the material being cut to push out away from the rest of the edge, sort of like the wake of a boat, so that there is little or no sliding friction from the material being cut rubbing against the edge.

In preparing a metal cutting tool, that is sometimes called "relief".

I should try to find that article. But it really was sort of a "stepped convex" kind of system.

Tabbed in.

Edit to add:

I found a "sort of" reprint of that article!

http://sharpeningmadeeasy.com/Juranitch1977Feb.htm

Last edited by Jim_WY; 04-03-2016 at 04:47 PM.
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  #29  
Old 04-07-2016, 07:32 AM
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I use paper wheels on a bench grinder,
Look them up very fast
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  #30  
Old 04-07-2016, 06:18 PM
supersharp
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This is the wicked Edge and I agree it's expensive ,but if you're serious about sharpening knives and you're looking for something repeatable for retouches I think this is the best sharpener on the market .For people looking for hair whittling edges , polished edges, sharpening expensive knives or possibly sharpening knives to make money you can't go wrong with this system!20160407_190752.jpg
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