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  #1  
Old 05-31-2018, 12:30 PM
Rick H.
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K-22 Striker Spring Replacement



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I know the subject of replacing a K-22 striker spring has come up before, but most of what I have read is pretty sketchy information wise and some of the info is pretty old. Has anyone here actually replaced a striker/firing pin spring on a K-22 and could you relate how you accomplished this task? Somewhere I read that the striker has an adjustment screw that must be properly adjusted, but no where have I read how to do this either. I should add that my K-22 is an early laminated stock SVT model with the two position safety made by Kimber of NY..

Thanks for any help in advance....

Rick H.

Last edited by Rick H.; 05-31-2018 at 12:34 PM.
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Old 05-31-2018, 09:30 PM
Shenandoah

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I have not taken a k22 bolt apart, so I can not give you first-hand knowledge. However, I recall reading here that the slot on the back end of the firing pin should be vertical for proper pin alignment regarding optimal head striking.
Here is a different thread posted by BobD that I found that may or may not be helpful.
https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...iring+pin+slot
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  #3  
Old 06-01-2018, 09:37 AM
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Phil in Alabama

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The striker/firing pin is threaded into the cocking piece. To remove is actually simple. Take the bolt out of the receiver, unscrew the cocking piece/striker assembly from from the bolt body. Loosen the tiny locking screw visible through the bottom of the striker so that the striker can be turned and unscrew the striker, which will be under some spring tension, so would require care to avoid loss or injury to eyes and such from the flying striker if you happened to let it loose. I would measure the length of the striker and spring assembly before taking it apart so that you can be sure to get it back right. Correct length should have the shoulder on the chamber end of the striker just touching the inside of the bolt body. I am not sure if it could be adjusted to protrude any further as I have not ever needed to do any adjustments on mine. It's just basic bolt action assembly, very much like most centerfire bolt actions, especially the Kimber 84M; the Kimber 22 is practically a rear locking centerfire action with the bolt bore offset from the barrel bore to enable correct location to strike the rim of the .22 rimfire cartridge.
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  #4  
Old 06-01-2018, 11:50 AM
Rick H.
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Thank you for the information guys. Phil, how should the firing pin be orientated in the bolt body? Should it be positioned in the typical vertical rimfire fashion or is it angled?

Rick H.
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Old 06-01-2018, 02:09 PM
Rick H.
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Well apparently there is a happy medium that must be obtained when adjusting the firing pin screw on a K-22. I took out of the bolt body and measured firing pin length and then proceeded to try adjusting the length of the pin and spring. When I turned it in all the way I ended up with a loud smack when I pulled the trigger, but no strike on the shell casing. When I went the other way or "out" the firing pin started making indentations on a shell case, but the further out I turned the screw the less of a mark was made on the casing. Of course this is all being done with the old firing pin or striker spring. Eventually I turned the screw back in until I got the best looking strike or hit on the shell casing. Ironically I am back to about where I started in my adjustment of the firing pin length.


Rick H.
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Old 06-01-2018, 04:43 PM
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What did you think about the strength of the spring? They look pretty strong, but not having actually disassembled one myself I don't have any sort of reference to gauge against.
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  #7  
Old 06-02-2018, 07:54 AM
Rick H.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil in Alabama View Post
What did you think about the strength of the spring? They look pretty strong, but not having actually disassembled one myself I don't have any sort of reference to gauge against.
Phil: Not having a K-22 with a "known" good striker spring in it makes it hard to answer your question. When then striker and spring are removed from the bolt body and the safety released the spring has a lot of give to it. When the striker and spring are still "cocked" after removal from the bolt body the spring seems relatively stiff. Obviously the spring is not stiff enough to give me good consistent hits on a shell though as I have a misfire every 20 to 25 rounds.

I called Kimber of NY yesterday and spoke to a very nice lady, Reni, who told me K-22 replacement parts are non-existent there. After explaining my situation she told me they have a somewhat "universal spring" for sale that may, or may not work. I decided to order the spring as it was only $5.00 and see if it works. Unfortunately for me I have to go out of town for three weeks so it will be a while before I can get to replacing the spring. I'll post some pics when I do the job and will report here how it works afterwards. The Kimber part number on the new spring is 1100322.

I did discover that when you take the striker and spring out of the bolt body and release the safety it goes into an "uncocked" position. I was worried that it would be difficult to re-cock the assembly to put it back in the bolt body, but as it turned out all you have to do is screw the striker and spring back into the bolt body and it automatically re-cocks it as you screw it in. Quite simple actually. How difficult it will be to actually disassemble the striker and spring is yet to be discovered.

Rick H.

Last edited by Rick H.; 06-02-2018 at 08:04 AM.
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  #8  
Old 06-10-2018, 05:48 PM
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Kimber K22 Firing Pin Spring Replacement

This is how I did it. Not saying it's the best way or the only way but it worked for me. YMMV

KIMBER FIRING PIN/SPRING REMOVAL METHOD


1) Check to be sure the gun is unloaded including the chamber.
2) Remove the Bolt Assembly from the receiver.
3) Put the safety in the "Middle" position.
4) Unscrew the Cocking Piece/Firing Pin Assembly from the Main
Bolt Body by turning it Counter Clockwise.
5) Move the safety from the "Middle" position to the "Fire"
position to Un-cock the Firing Pin/Cocking Piece Assembly.
6) Back out the 1/16" Hex Head set screw on the bottom of the
Cocking Piece several turns. (This set screw holds the
threaded Firing Pin in position during normal use.
9) Compress the Firing Pin Spring to take pressure off the
Shoulder of the Firing Pin. *(See note on this below)
10) Use the Small Slotted Screw in the back of the Firing Pin to
unscrew the Firing Pin from the Firing Pin/ Cocking Piece
Assembly by turning it Clockwise until the Firing Pin is
released.
11) Remove Firing Pin and Spring from the Cocking Piece.
12) The Firing Pin and Spring may now be separated.

* This is the tricky part if you do not have a tool specifically made to do this. I could not find one and did not want to buy one for a one time use even if it was available. The Firing Pin Spring is under a lot of compression stress so take care in this process. I felt it was important to release either all or at least part of the Firing Pin Spring compression stress prior to removing Firing Pin from the Cocking Piece. My hope was this would help prevent damage to the threads of the Firing Pin and/or Cocking Piece or any other damage to the Firing Pin itself. Perhaps most importantly this should help to keep the Firing Pin from flying across the room and injuring someone else or myself in the process. Below is how I compressed the spring for disassembly.



KIMBER FIRING PIN SPRING COMPRESSION METHOD

1) Get some small strong for diameter string. This string must have a relatively high tensile strength as wells as be able to slide easily on the Assembly. (I used Dental Floss as it is something I had readily available. There are likely better choices.)
2) Cut several pieces about 18” long, wind or braid together and tie an open loop in both ends.
3) Lie these strands of string along top of the Firing Pin/Cocking Piece Assembly extending the loops past both ends.
4) Cut several more pieces 8” long. Wind or braid these pieces together and then make a tight wrap overlapping the long strands that lie on top of the Assembly by wrapping it four for five times tightly in the grooves of the Spring and tie tightly.
5) Do the same thing on top of the long strands at the other end of the Assembly being sure again to wrap tightly and then tie tightly.
6) Take the long strands and run the loop on one end through the other loop end near the tip of the firing pin.
7) The long strands can now be pulled taught to compress or at least partially compress the Firing Pin Spring.*
8) When you have created some compression of the Firing Pin Spring wrap the long end of the strands tightly several times around the center of the Spring and tie tightly. (This should hold the Firing Pin Spring in a slightly compressed state and take pressure off the Firing Pin and allow for further disassembly.)
9) You should now be able to unscrew and remove the Firing Pin from the Cocking Piece by turning the small slotted screw in the back of the Firing Pin counter clockwise. (This is step 10 on page 1.)
* Alternately, if step (7) directly above does not quickly provide enough spring compression you can choose to tie the long pieces tightly together while being pulled taught to remove any slack. With this method a short rod of some type can then be inserted between the long string and the Firing Pin Spring. This rod can then be twisted and wound further to create some compression of the spring for Firing Pin Removal. (I used a piece of a chopstick for this.)

Good luck,

twofish


Shorter larger overall diameter Replacement Spring from Kimber top.

Longer smaller overall diameter Factory Spring below .






Last edited by twofish; 06-13-2018 at 04:11 PM. Reason: Added a couple pics.
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  #9  
Old 06-23-2018, 02:17 PM
Rick H.
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Thank you twofish for the detailed take down instructions. I wasn't sure just how much pressure would be on the firing pin spring but I elected to take it apart the old style way...by hand. As it turned out I didn't need to worry about too much pressure on the spring because it is almost out of pressure by the time it releases from the cocking piece. You just have to keep the cocking piece restrained when unscrewing the last couple of turns. When I reinstalled the firing pin and spring into the cocking piece I placed the assembly into a wood block with a hole in it that allowed the end of the firing pin to slip through to the outer shoulder. Then while pushing on the cocking piece from the rear I was able to start turning the cocking piece on. At that point I moved the firing pin assembly to a small vise that has padded jaws which held the front firing pin shoulder in place while I screwed the cocking piece to where I wanted it. All in all quite a simple process and much easier than many other such assemblies I have dealt with.


If possible I would appreciate a picture from someone of a fired cartridge head so I can compare the depth of the firing strike between one of my cases and the picture of one sent to me.


As a footnote to this project the new firing pin spring that Kimber sent me does seem to work quite well. However there is a little bit of drag from the outside diameter of it when inserting it into the bolt body.. I may correct this problem later on by sanding and polishing the outside of the firing pin spring should I run into problems down the road, but it is nice to know there is a source for these springs for the K-22 actions.


Rick H.
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  #10  
Old 06-24-2018, 10:24 PM
bobn
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quick question gents, are you leaving the gun cocked in storage? I always lower mine while closing the bolt. seems weird a gun made in the 90s needs a spring when there are tons of older cheaper ones not....thanks for your opinion....bob
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  #11  
Old 06-25-2018, 08:43 AM
Rick H.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobn View Post
quick question gents, are you leaving the gun cocked in storage? I always lower mine while closing the bolt. seems weird a gun made in the 90s needs a spring when there are tons of older cheaper ones not....thanks for your opinion....bob
Bob, regarding my SVT being cocked in storage is something I don't know. I do know the rifle sat in a collection for many years and was almost never shot based on the condition of the rifle when I bought it. So my guess and it's only a guess, was that it was probably left cocked for several years. I personally do not leave any of my rifles, bolt or semi-autos, cocked when in storage. I also don't leave any of my semi-auto pistols assembled when in storage. I disassemble them and place them in their respective boxes. Some will say with modern metal spring technology this isn't necessary, but I follow my gut feelings and take them apart to reduce the chance of recoil or mainsprings taking a set.


Rick H.
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Old 06-25-2018, 09:07 PM
bobn
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thanks for reply,,,,,bob
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  #13  
Old 06-27-2018, 09:36 AM
joet333 is online now
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[QUOTE=Rick H.;11072479]
If possible I would appreciate a picture from someone of a fired cartridge head so I can compare the depth of the firing strike between one of my cases and the picture of one sent to me.

Rick-Attached is a photo of a fired cartridge case from my K17 ProVarmint in .17 Mach2. The bolt, firing pin, and head space are similar between the K17 and K22.
I have since modified the firing pin tip from .090" to .070" to get the impact just inside of the rim, as per Calfee's suggestion. I've never had a FTF.
JoeT

Last edited by joet333; 06-28-2018 at 03:45 PM.
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  #14  
Old 06-27-2018, 09:46 AM
Rick H.
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Thank you for the pic Joe. My firing pin strike is exactly 90 degrees off from yours. The depression on my cases is also much shallower. I will have to turn my firing pin 90 degrees to match your strike. When you modified your firing pin what did you do to it? Thanks for the help…..


Rick H.
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Old 06-27-2018, 09:59 AM
joet333 is online now
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Rick- the photo may be misleading...the firing pin strike is vertical (top dead center).
I believe that Kimber designed the bolt centerline above the bore centerline to achieve the proper strike on the rim.
To modify the firing pin, I gently filed the top corner of the firing pin at a 45 degree angle to reduce the tip from .090 to .070".
JoeT
Also, I believe that you can increase the depth of the firing pin strike by adjusting the screw at the rear of the striker.

Last edited by joet333; 06-27-2018 at 10:01 AM.
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