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Old 11-15-2020, 09:48 AM
Signmaster
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Ejector play



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I've had a few stovepipes in the Mark lately, and had first thought it was the crappy ammo I've been burning up in it.

But cleaning it yesterday, I found there was a little play in the ejector. Not a great deal, but it moves, and enough to hear the metal "ting" of the side to side if you are rotating the barrel.


I guess it's time to get a new one and get it pinned. I don't have a good vice or many gunsmithing tools, so I'll probably drop it off and have them to the new part and rivet.


But I'm also thinking if the pistol is out of service for a little while, maybe time to do the trigger. For now I'm happy with how it breaks and the sear, but think I'd like to do the VQ trigger and get rid of the pre travel and have some adjustment. Does anyone have any good links to the complete trigger (or complete lower) disassembly/reassembly? It's just much easier to do if someone else has found the areas that will test you..... like when that little spring wants to launch.

I doubt I'll mess with the sear or hammer, but other than clean up is there anything worth tackling while it's apart? Considering I've never stripped the lower I'm sure there is plenty to clean, but nothing has given me any indication of wear or problems.
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Old 11-15-2020, 10:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Signmaster View Post
...Does anyone have any good links to the complete trigger (or complete lower) disassembly/reassembly? It's just much easier to do if someone else has found the areas that will test you..... like when that little spring wants to launch.

I doubt I'll mess with the sear or hammer, but other than clean up is there anything worth tackling while it's apart? Considering I've never stripped the lower I'm sure there is plenty to clean, but nothing has given me any indication of wear or problems.
MkII:

Ruger Dis and Re Assembly Video HERE!


MkIV:

VQ Action Dis and Re Assembly Video HERE!

VQ Action Dis and Re Assembly Paper HERE!

VQ Trigger PT/OT Setting Video HERE!

Ted
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Last edited by Theo98; 11-15-2020 at 10:32 AM.
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Old 11-15-2020, 10:51 AM
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The pics I've seen of ejector rivets tightened up by Ruger were less than pretty.

The common option is to replace with an aftermarket ejector that's threaded and is screwed on. I've read that they work okay and don't tend to loosen up like you might think.

The ejector on my MKII was installed crooked. This caused a lot of wear on it, and slowed the cycling - causing stovepipes and such. So I gently turned it straight with a screwdriver. Then it was loose. OOPS!

Squashing the rivet again wouldn't be easy to do, but I found an easy fix. Using a center punch to peen the receiver cutout into the space beside the ejector tab was the plan. First whack was a little to far away to drift metal into the gap. Second whack was PERFECT!. It's nice and tight and straight. Problem solved.

Pic of the fix:

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Old 11-15-2020, 03:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Signmaster View Post
I doubt I'll mess with the sear or hammer, but other than clean up is there anything worth tackling while it's apart? Considering I've never stripped the lower I'm sure there is plenty to clean, but nothing has given me any indication of wear or problems.
You don't have to take the lower apart for fixing the ejector, but a VQ sear improved my shooting fun factor by at least 5X. While you're at it, you might as well buy the VQ trigger, which will further increase the fun factor and change the feel of the gun completely. The parts are not that expensive, can be found on ebay, and are easy to install if you're halfway coordinated.

Good luck!
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Old 11-15-2020, 06:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Theo98 View Post
MkII:

Ruger Dis and Re Assembly Video HERE!


MkIV:

VQ Action Dis and Re Assembly Video HERE!

VQ Action Dis and Re Assembly Paper HERE!

VQ Trigger PT/OT Setting Video HERE!

Ted

Awesome and many thanks. Saves me some searching.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Test_Engineer View Post
The pics I've seen of ejector rivets tightened up by Ruger were less than pretty.

The common option is to replace with an aftermarket ejector that's threaded and is screwed on. I've read that they work okay and don't tend to loosen up like you might think.

The ejector on my MKII was installed crooked. This caused a lot of wear on it, and slowed the cycling - causing stovepipes and such. So I gently turned it straight with a screwdriver. Then it was loose. OOPS!

Squashing the rivet again wouldn't be easy to do, but I found an easy fix. Using a center punch to peen the receiver cutout into the space beside the ejector tab was the plan. First whack was a little to far away to drift metal into the gap. Second whack was PERFECT!. It's nice and tight and straight. Problem solved.

Pic of the fix:

Now you have me wishing I could use your fix. I suspect that play I found might be causing some drag and the stovepipes. If I decide to do a new ejector and rivet, I might get someone locally to do it vs using Ruger, or just investigate the threaded fix.



Quote:
Originally Posted by MG-70 View Post
You don't have to take the lower apart for fixing the ejector, but a VQ sear improved my shooting fun factor by at least 5X. While you're at it, you might as well buy the VQ trigger, which will further increase the fun factor and change the feel of the gun completely. The parts are not that expensive, can be found on ebay, and are easy to install if you're halfway coordinated.

Good luck!
Understood on the ejector, but the disassembly comment was for the VQ trigger. I'm happy with the stock sear, but then again I was happy with the stock trigger until I noticed the travel more. I might end up doing both.





So glad I found this forum. I think the only way it would be better is if I was to post of a potential problem and have forum members come over and fix it! Awesome input guys, much appreciated.
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  #6  
Old 11-16-2020, 09:07 PM
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I think tactical solutions sells a replacement ejector that has a screw instead of a rivet very easy to install
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Old 11-18-2020, 06:18 PM
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I would play it safe and start with a call to Volquartsen. They may repair it for you.
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  #8  
Old 11-19-2020, 11:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turtle1903 View Post
I think tactical solutions sells a replacement ejector that has a screw instead of a rivet very easy to install
Yessir, here it is; *note that it's for Mark I, II, III & 22/45 pistols only:



One just needs to be careful when drilling out the original rivet.

Available here at Brownells...
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Old 11-22-2020, 09:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Test_Engineer View Post

Pic of the fix:

Wouldn't it have been much more proper to have motivated the tab on the back of your ejector, and thus the ejector itself, into it's proper orientation (the tab is what locates and maintains the ejector's proper position in the receiver) using the appropriate non marring means/tools, than going all cave man on your receiver haphazardly with of all things, a centerpunch??

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Old 11-22-2020, 11:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrewBone
Wouldn't it have been much more proper to have motivated the tab on the back of your ejector, and thus the ejector itself, into it's proper orientation (the tab is what locates and maintains the ejector's proper position in the receiver) using the appropriate non marring means/tools, than going all cave man on your receiver haphazardly with of all things, a centerpunch??

The opening in the receiver is larger than the width of the tab. That allows the ejector to wiggle a fairly large amount side-to-side if the rivet isn't completely tight. Unfortunately, Ruger didn't have my ejector installed straight when they tightened the rivet. At least in my case, the ejector is straight when the tab is completely against the right side of the cutout.

When a casing would hit the loose ejector, the tab would bounce off the right side and end up in a somewhat random position for the next shot - resulting in stovepipes.

Retightening the rivet would have been the most desirable fix, but requires a long, thin anvil designed specifically for this purpose. I don't have one and it wouldn't make sense to make one for tightening a single rivet.

Since the correct position for the ejector tab was all the way to the right side (not somewhat centered), there was nothing "haphazard" about targeting receiver material near the left side to drift into the gap. And considering Ruger was know for "going caveman" (with hammers) on 22/45 receivers to tighten them on the frame lugs, I see the tiny deformation of my fix to be a non issue. The center punch was just the best tool for the job.
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Old 11-22-2020, 11:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Test_Engineer View Post
The opening in the receiver is larger than the width of the tab. That allows the ejector to wiggle a fairly large amount side-to-side if the rivet isn't completely tight. Unfortunately, Ruger didn't have my ejector installed straight when they tightened the rivet. At least in my case, the ejector is straight when the tab is completely against the right side of the cutout.

When a casing would hit the loose ejector, the tab would bounce off the right side and end up in a somewhat random position for the next shot - resulting in stovepipes.

Retightening the rivet would have been the most desirable fix, but requires a long, thin anvil designed specifically for this purpose. I don't have one and it wouldn't make sense to make one for tightening a single rivet.

Since the correct position for the ejector tab was all the way to the right side (not somewhat centered), there was nothing "haphazard" about targeting receiver material near the left side to drift into the gap. And considering Ruger was know for "going caveman" (with hammers) on 22/45 receivers to tighten them on the frame lugs, I see the tiny deformation of my fix to be a non issue. The center punch was just the best tool for the job.

I think that play is what is giving me the stovepipes as well.

I think I'll go with the Tactical Solutions fix. Though I'm not opposed to using your fix, I'm not sure if it applies to my pistol with a single punch being able to do it. With the screw in ejector, hopefully I can get everything centered and in the right position with no risk of punching in the wrong spot.

And note taken on drilling out the old rivet. I'll file it flat enough to get a centerpunch starting point on it to be safe.



Once again, thanks for the great feedback everyone.
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Old 11-22-2020, 02:09 PM
DrewBone

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Test_Engineer View Post
The opening in the receiver is larger than the width of the tab. That allows the ejector to wiggle a fairly large amount side-to-side if the rivet isn't completely tight. Unfortunately, Ruger didn't have my ejector installed straight when they tightened the rivet. At least in my case, the ejector is straight when the tab is completely against the right side of the cutout.

When a casing would hit the loose ejector, the tab would bounce off the right side and end up in a somewhat random position for the next shot - resulting in stovepipes.

Retightening the rivet would have been the most desirable fix, but requires a long, thin anvil designed specifically for this purpose. I don't have one and it wouldn't make sense to make one for tightening a single rivet.

Since the correct position for the ejector tab was all the way to the right side (not somewhat centered), there was nothing "haphazard" about targeting receiver material near the left side to drift into the gap. And considering Ruger was know for "going caveman" (with hammers) on 22/45 receivers to tighten them on the frame lugs, I see the tiny deformation of my fix to be a non issue. The center punch was just the best tool for the job.
We apparently come from different trains of thought regarding correct procedures, non issues, and the choice of tools we consider/use to accomplish "the job".

I'd remove that offending ejector & rivet and purchase the proper replacements, then fabricate a proper dolly to use as a back up and use either impact or spin riveting methods to attach the new ejector properly before I'd ever centerpunch my receiver. Geez, just the thought gives me the chills...
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Old 11-22-2020, 11:17 PM
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Originally Posted by DrewBone View Post
We apparently come from different trains of thought regarding correct procedures, non issues, and the choice of tools we consider/use to accomplish "the job".

I'd remove that offending ejector & rivet and purchase the proper replacements, then fabricate a proper dolly to use as a back up and use either impact or spin riveting methods to attach the new ejector properly before I'd ever centerpunch my receiver. Geez, just the thought gives me the chills...
I just used a couple pieces of key stock for back up, a vise and a little ingenuity to peen the rivet to tighten up my ejector. Took about 10 min., NO center punching the receiver! %%%%
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