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  #16  
Old 07-04-2020, 02:36 PM
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Iím 33... went from salary golf superintendent to work for the state.
Will never look back. Poor and happy.
I spent many hours and years making it to golf superintend for nothing but rape.

I love the outdoors too much to get raped on salary for 60+ hours a week.

Money doesnít buy freedom


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  #17  
Old 07-04-2020, 04:46 PM
Pat McCoy
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dlong said
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Your last 5 years of income before retirement really effects your SS dollars.
Actually SS retirement benefits are based on top 35 years of income. See this link: (https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10070.pdf).

Waiting for Medicare can be a big deal, unless you can qualify under a spouse's plan at work. Just an alternative for some folks.

Long a go my Dad told me that if you had a great job, but hated where you lived, you'd never be happy. Live where you are happy, and find a job you can live with. I followed that advice, and have no regrets.
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  #18  
Old 07-04-2020, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Vee3 View Post
For most of my career I had highly stressful jobs. Much of the time working long hours (salary, so no overtime pay) and/or working a 2nd job. I generally worked 60 - 75 hours per week.

Our Son is autistic, and my Wife stayed home to care for and homeschool him. He's 21 now and doing well; working part time and attending college.

In 2016 I was laid off from the highest stress job I'd ever had. It was bad for my health and sanity, but the pay and benefits were great. I was there for ten years, and the job provided well for us.

Later in 2016 I landed a better job. Best pay/benefits I'd ever had. Only a few miles from home, worked with great people and only had to go in three days a week. I was laid off (due to CV) in April.

I've been looking at job openings I'm qualified for that would pay near what I used to make. All appear to want someone willing to sell his soul to the company. Travel, overtime, weekends, on call, work any shift, etc. I know for a fact that most of these companies only hire people straight out of college.

Now that I'm older and have fewer financial commitments, I'm thinking of ditching the want of higher pay in favor of something that I might actually enjoy. I can get by okay with ~50% of what I used to make, as long as I have good medical insurance. I'm about maxed out on how much of my remaining free time on Earth I want to sell.

May have to buy CCI instead of the more spendy stuff, but that's okay.

What say you?
fwiw, ive been looking too but i get the feeling that most employers are still stuck in the "employers market" mindset and the perfect (no training needed)person will walk through the door.

But ive been there too with the stress/pay and so forth. So my last job i had the same pay, more time off and less stress. No calls after my shift was done and any issues left un resolved were passed onto the next shift. I tried no to do that, but you only have so many hours in a day to fix things.

If you can make it with less pay and less stress job, then its a no brainer. Since ive been paying my COBRA out of pocket it hurts. So if you can also find a place that will pay for your medical thats even better. My last job, i had to pay iirc, 45 USD out of my paycheck for my health. Some people were moaning and groaning about that, but having to pay 600 i was happy to pay the 45. It wasnt that way when i got hired, but i have observed through my life, so far, that healthcare cost only go up. not down.

dont forget there are many stresses too. If $$$ is an issue, that can be just a big a stressor as anything else since $$ issues is a 24/7/365 "job" to deal with.

you can also look for something "fun" too. whatever that is to you. And you never know what will happen where more $$ many find you.
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  #19  
Old 07-04-2020, 05:26 PM
Bradical
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The rub for so many in becoming more independent is "getting good and affordable" medical insurance. Although the Affordable Care Act (ACA) allowed for "guarantee issue" if one wasn't able to qualify for a federal subsidies the cost can be a deal breaker.

However, today, if you're predominantly healthy there are good alternatives to the ACA for heath insurance. The catch is they are underwritten (screened for pre-existing health conditions).

I was in a similar situation prior to 9/11. That event forced life and job changes that have turned out for a more independent and better life.

PM me if you want to learn if health insurance alternatives to the ACA are available in your State.

Last edited by Bradical; 07-04-2020 at 05:31 PM.
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  #20  
Old 07-05-2020, 01:27 AM
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PM me if you want to learn if health insurance alternatives to the ACA are available in your State.
I appreciate the offer Bradical, but after investigating health sharing plans and the like, I decided to go with a traditional company via the ACA. I was able to keep the same insurance company and doctors my family had when I was working, at a fraction of the cost of COBRA.

I just applied for a job with a DoD contractor that (if I'm hired, fingers crossed) should meet my wants/needs of a lower stress job with health insurance. Somewhat different field than I worked in for most of my career, but an interesting niche that my education and experience appear to check all of their boxes for. I hope...

Stinks being unemployed. I liked it for a month, but now I want to get back to work. I'm not so sure I'd like full on retirement, even if I had $10M in the bank.
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  #21  
Old 07-05-2020, 02:05 AM
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Originally Posted by j.r. guerra in s. texas View Post
Some of the most unhappiest people I know are people in high stress jobs. Long hours and demands of performing to their superiors ages them harshly.
Before I started the job just prior to my last one, the hiring manager asked if I was prepared to age two years for every one worked. I told him no problem; I was used to it. But it was a problem. I'd accepted it as normal.

Guy I worked with for many years is still at that company. Makes well into six figures. He's 60, divorced, overweight, drinks a lot, diabetic, has stents in his heart and has had two small strokes. I recently told him that they're gonna bury him with a pile of cash on his coffin soon.

Sadly, I was the one who took him alongside me down that path ~25 years ago, thinking I was doing him a big favor.
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  #22  
Old 07-05-2020, 02:20 AM
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Why not start your own consulting business ? Believe me its a lot less stressful than working for a Company. As a Consultant they pay you 5 times more than they do as an employee and dont subject you to all the Company BS. You go get the job done and get paid. Yes youll have to buy your own insurance, but thats not hard. Overtime you can partner up with others in your field . Its a good life if you do it right.
I did independent DFM (Design for Manufacturing) consulting on and off for a while. It was tough; the big players were kind of hard to compete with, even back then.
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  #23  
Old 07-05-2020, 02:36 AM
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Long a go my Dad told me that if you had a great job, but hated where you lived, you'd never be happy. Live where you are happy, and find a job you can live with. I followed that advice, and have no regrets.
I found that it's not just where you live, but where you have to go to work.

Two of my jobs I didn't have to drive more than 25 miles, but they might as well have been located in 3rd world countries.
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  #24  
Old 07-05-2020, 07:30 AM
Bradical
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I appreciate the offer Bradical, but after investigating health sharing plans and the like, I decided to go with a traditional company via the ACA. I was able to keep the same insurance company and doctors my family had when I was working, at a fraction of the cost of COBRA.

I just applied for a job with a DoD contractor that (if I'm hired, fingers crossed) should meet my wants/needs of a lower stress job with health insurance. Somewhat different field than I worked in for most of my career, but an interesting niche that my education and experience appear to check all of their boxes for. I hope...

Stinks being unemployed. I liked it for a month, but now I want to get back to work. I'm not so sure I'd like full on retirement, even if I had $10M in the bank.
I'm glad you found a solution that works for you and your family. Best of luck with the new opportunity. I really hope you land the job.
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  #25  
Old 07-05-2020, 07:47 AM
Bradical
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I appreciate the offer Bradical, but after investigating health sharing plans and the like, I decided to go with a traditional company via the ACA. I was able to keep the same insurance company and doctors my family had when I was working, at a fraction of the cost of COBRA.
FWIW, I wasn't referring to cost sharing (not insurance) "agreements." Some State Insurance Departments now allow "Short Term Medical" plans to be bought for up to 1 year periods. This is a game changer for people living in those States, since that length of time assures that a person will be able to get to the ACAs "Open Enrollment Period." The wild card in all these scanorios is the legal viability of the ACA itself. Which is highly dubious, but today remains the (1,000lb guerilla) law of the land.
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  #26  
Old 07-05-2020, 10:39 AM
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Was in the Army for 22+ years, with my (almost) last five years in the Pentagon.

Never wanted to go there, and it was the first (and last) assignment where I really didn't want to go. But I had no choice. I was a loggie, working in OPS, and it turned out to be absolutely wonderful! Long hours, long commute, and high stress - but only because I immersed myself in the job rather than "check the block" and move on. Rather than a one-or-two year assignment, I was able to stay in the same job for almost five years before I retired. A large part of that was because I wound up being the best at my job because I so enjoyed the work and understood the co-relationships of just about everything I did. In short, I was considered an "expert" in my field of work. Hours were typically 12 hours/day, plus a 1.5 - 3-hour commute, with sometimes calls in the middle of the night from high-ranking people (to me). I would also frequently log-in from home when I got home to do some more (mostly admin) work. I just enjoyed it, but it was high stress from my first day.

I was a bachelor when I started, but married when I retired. It helps the ego to be considered the "Shell Answer Man" in my field. Quite possibly one of the biggest stress-makers is finding a job when retiring from the Army. I had none, as I was offered a great job even before I dropped my inevitable retirement papers, doing pretty much the same thing but at a larger scale. Didn't even need to interview, and a resumť was but a formality for the contract. I was an "expert" on all the processes and was considered that by the customer - so I didn't have a learning curve and didn't have to "prove" myself. The biggest stress was figuring out what to wear each day...My wife helped me with that!

I stayed with the same contractor for over 14 years, until we were laid off because the contract expired and was not renewed. By then, I had been 100% telecommuting for well over a year, and a few years before that at 3-4 days a week. Was offered several jobs, but all with 100% on-site work in a commute that would have been horrific. So I retired, at the ripe old age of 59 in Dec 2011.

No pension from the company I worked for, but a hefty 401K, plenty of stock from an employee stock-purchase-plan, and my Army retirement. I toughed it out until age 62 and started drawing SS. An unexpected surprise was full MEDICARE for my wife and transferring some of my SS credits to her so she could also draw SS.

Stress went to zero, but I can't say I had much stress doing what I did at work - it had become a hobby! I found other hobbies, quite easily, with work around our farm.

Now, we're happy, both on MEDICARE and TRICARE-FOR-LIFE with relatively few medical bills (mostly for meds), and with a monthly income that generally exceeds our expenses (except for a few months with taxes, and insurance). And, some annuities we invested in years ago are starting to pay out each month.

I put less than 1,500 miles on my car this past year (mileage I would typically put on in 2-3 weeks when I was commuting)!

Life is good, with essentially no stress for the past several years. Don't even need to worry about what to wear!
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  #27  
Old 07-05-2020, 03:30 PM
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Stinks being unemployed. I liked it for a month, but now I want to get back to work. I'm not so sure I'd like full on retirement, even if I had $10M in the bank.
i liked it too, but i used the time to take a vacation before the COVID and get my brain back into order and to rethink on what i wanted to do.

Also, i still have several years of work left in me so to speak. Its just finding someone to pay and give me a chance.

i thought about retirement, but what scares me the most is what i will do with most of my time. I know others have plans/ideas and i have them too, but i need to have more concrete things in place.

good luck in your choice.
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  #28  
Old 07-05-2020, 03:44 PM
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I had enough of a high stress job in 2003. Took a new one at approx 1/2 the pay.
Have been much happier now and sleep well at night. Would probably be dead now if I stayed at the old job! Made lot's of new friend's in the process. Well worth it in my opinion.

Best of luck to you!
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  #29  
Old 07-05-2020, 04:05 PM
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A wife that never worked is entitled to SS equal to 50% of yours at her retirement age. Of coarse the sooner you start taking SS the less everyone gets. So if you go out at 62 and drop dead, the wife gets only your amount and loses hers. And at 62 your only getting 70% of your full retirement benefit. Lots of math involved. Benefits are the killer. Max FRA benefit is only around $3100 a month even if your making a million a year. Plus your going to get dinged for Medicare so that $3100 can go to $2800 real fast. Then there is supplemental which can run 8k a year for a couple. I’m forecasting supplemental to be close to $1000 a month for my wife and I when we retire. So by the time I retire at 65 I hope, between supplemental, dental, property taxes, income taxes, utilities, home and auto insurance and upkeep, entertainment, the monthly amount needed is to scary to mention. That’s why a little side gig is good. Stimulate the brain and extra fun money.
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  #30  
Old 07-06-2020, 11:43 AM
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A wife that never worked is entitled to SS equal to 50% of yours at her retirement age. Of coarse the sooner you start taking SS the less everyone gets. So if you go out at 62 and drop dead, the wife gets only your amount and loses hers. And at 62 your only getting 70% of your full retirement benefit. Lots of math involved. Benefits are the killer. Max FRA benefit is only around $3100 a month even if your making a million a year. Plus your going to get dinged for Medicare so that $3100 can go to $2800 real fast. Then there is supplemental which can run 8k a year for a couple. Iím forecasting supplemental to be close to $1000 a month for my wife and I when we retire. So by the time I retire at 65 I hope, between supplemental, dental, property taxes, income taxes, utilities, home and auto insurance and upkeep, entertainment, the monthly amount needed is to scary to mention. Thatís why a little side gig is good. Stimulate the brain and extra fun money.
Great point. dlong!
One of the factors that fed into my decision was diagnosis of prostate cancer, the unsuccessful removal of said gland (metastasized), and subsequent forecast of my survival. The memories of my deceased old brother from that same evil disease sort of helped cement my decision to take SS at the earliest opportunity, since my life expectancy at the time would have been less than what I am living.

Still have that nasty "Sword of Damocles" hanging over me, but it is not a sword controlled by government but, rather, controlled by my Savior.

Private insurance/providers rather than "gummint" providers gives me a small sense that, perhaps, I'm something more than a burden on the fiscal spreadsheet of national debt. MEDICARE and TRICARE aside from (both"gummint entities" that would profit from our demise), we both served our nation and think that - perhaps - there would be some sort of recognition of our service to this great nation.

I guess we'll see...
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