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Old 09-20-2019, 11:45 AM
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How important is parallax for your rimfire



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When you are looking for a new scope for your rimfire, do you take into consideration whether it has a fixed or adjustable parallax setting? A lot of guys are using centerfire scopes with a fixed parallax at 100 yards, would you rather have a parallax you can dial down to 25 yards or lower? What other features would you like to see on an adjustable parallax scope? How big of an objective would you want, 42,44,50 or 56mm?
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:05 PM
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None of my shooting requires the light-gathering of a large objective, so on that account I have maxed out at 42. Personally, I would opt for AO long before a large objective.
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:05 PM
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AO is always best. But under 7 x not critical . Depends on what Iím shooting at, paper targets at 50 yards AO 14 x + magnification and at least 44 objective. Cans and crap in a field 7 x 32 objective and parallax fixed at 50 yards. On the little scopes I hate the big ocular boxes on modern scopes, ugly and get in the way. Also if the magnification ring has a nub on it , like a certain Nikon I have the fact that at full magnification it interferes with the bolt knob and my thumb thereon is enraging! It know sits on a semi auto . 1/4 MOA clicks just donít cut it on any scope , want 1/8th. Just my opinion.
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bman940 View Post
When you are looking for a new scope for your rimfire, do you take into consideration whether it has a fixed or adjustable parallax setting? A lot of guys are using centerfire scopes with a fixed parallax at 100 yards, would you rather have a parallax you can dial down to 25 yards or lower? What other features would you like to see on an adjustable parallax scope? How big of an objective would you want, 42,44,50 or 56mm?
Yes I want one that has either a side focus or A/O because my eye sight is changing I am not 30 years old any more. I have scopes that I can't use at the top of their range...and they are not that high in magnification either. (2-10X) I like scopes that can adjust down as low as I need...my V-16s can go down to 30 FEET not yards like other brands of scopes.

The size of the scope and the objective size has a lot to do on how the scope fits the rifle...I don't care of 30mm scopes on my rimfires...some of them are so large you can use them for a carry handle for your rimfire rifle ...and they add a lot of weight for a hunting rifle and they make a small rimfire rifle big and bulky. The largest scope's objective I have on any rimfire is 44mm which today is small compared to all the 50s and larger that are out there. I won't put a 50mm on any of my rimfire hunting rifles...for the bench hubble will work.

for me being a magnum guy (17hmr and 22mag) I want more magnification for those longer shots those calibers can give me...for a 22lr hunting rifle then 2-7x or 3-9x is more than enough...if your on the bench shooting paper then the higher you go the better.

Like I said it all depends what your doing with this rifle. The only thing I tell people is to find a reticle that works for you not one you have to make work...I have bought a lot of scopes over the last 40 years and they are only a few reticles today I really like. I have had reticles that were so thick you could only use them for elephant hunting (not really) but they are better for big game and other so thin they would disappear in certain back grounds.

So when your looking for a new scope choose the reticle first, then magnification and last brand...they is no short cut for good glass that is a given and make sure it has a side focus or A/O...it will save you money ten years from now.

So good luck on your quest.

Signalman
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:26 PM
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For my rimfire scopes I want the parallax to be adjustable for the most part. If I still squirrel hunted a fixed parallax 3-9 would be fine for that rifle. Here in KY a fixed parallax is fine on most deer rifles, mine at least where I hunt. I have a 22-250 and have shot ground hogs out to 500 yards and a adjustable parallax is a must on that rifle. Personally 40mm is big enough on the objective, I see no need for something as big as my arm on the end of my scope. Even the scope on the 22-250 is a 40mm objective and is plenty bright.

For me the bottom line for scopes no matter rimfire or centerfire depends on the use of the rifle. No one scope model works for it all.

Last edited by justinp61; 09-20-2019 at 12:30 PM.
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bman940 View Post
When you are looking for a new scope for your rimfire, do you take into consideration whether it has a fixed or adjustable parallax setting? A lot of guys are using centerfire scopes with a fixed parallax at 100 yards, would you rather have a parallax you can dial down to 25 yards or lower? What other features would you like to see on an adjustable parallax scope? How big of an objective would you want, 42,44,50 or 56mm?
Some reading below but to answer your questions:

The importance of being able to adjust parallax depends on the degree of precision you require. If you're shooting with low mag at decent sized targets at "normal" ranges it's not very important if you can make sure you get your head in exactly the same place each time. You probably don't need the ability to adjust parallax.

If you are shooting at very small targets (or want to hit a precise spot on a larger target), are using lots of mag, and are shooting at targets that are very near or very far it is very important to be able to adjust for parallax.

Bear in mind the "normal" range for rimfire scopes and centerfire scopes. A rimfire scope is going to be focused somewhere around 50m while a centerfire scope is going to be focused somewhere around 100m. The view of targets in that range (actually an envelope depending on depth of field) is going to be parallax free. Get much outside that envelope and that's when the view (focused or not) and parallax error becomes an issue. So, if you want a fixed-focus scope make sure it is focused at the ranges you will normally be shooting -- 50m or so for rimfire. If you get an adjustable scope (Adjustable Objective or Side Focus) make sure it will go down to the shortest distance you intend to shoot. Many adjustable scopes made for CF rifles bottom out at 50m. You want down to 25m or even 10m on a rimfire.

Objective lens size is related to mag level. It's about delivering an image of a certain size to your eyeball. The more mag the scope has the larger that lens needs to be to present the eyeball with an image large enough to appear bright and clear and to give a better eye relief.

Take a look at this pic. Rifle never moved but the camera did, simulating the effect of not getting your head down in the same spot each time. Because of parallax error, the crosshairs appear to move because of the eyeball's location. So, with parallax error you can't really be sure of the exact point you are actually aiming at. The ability to adjust out that error puts the crosshair in the same spot every time, regardless of where your eyeball is.



Czech out these threads:

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum....php?p=1522944

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forum...d.php?t=364832
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Last edited by Sophia; 09-20-2019 at 01:47 PM.
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:34 PM
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It is not just the ability to compensate for parallax error. A scope with side correction for parallax or an adjustable objective will allow you much better target focus when shooting at ranges much less than or more than the range for which a fixed objective scope is set to be parallax free.

This is less a problem when shooting at longer ranges than 50 yards with a rimfire scope set to be parallax-free at 50 yards. I don't shoot rimfire rifles past 100 yards and at that range the target focus is acceptable.

But for shooting at 25 yards or less, I find that parallax compensation allows for much better focus of small targets.

For the type of shooting I do, I don't require magnification greater than 9X or an objective larger than 40 mm. A 40 mm objective at 9X magnification gives an exit pupil of nearly 4.5mm. Maximum pupil size for most humans is around 8 mm fully dialated and diminishes with age. Pupil would normally only be maximally dialated in very dark conditions in which I do not shoot so I really don't need a bigger objective on a larger, heavier scope for that degree of magnificaion.

Last edited by pblanc; 09-20-2019 at 12:39 PM.
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:34 PM
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My dream scope

Quote:
Originally Posted by bman940 View Post
When you are looking for a new scope for your rimfire, do you take into consideration whether it has a fixed or adjustable parallax setting? A lot of guys are using centerfire scopes with a fixed parallax at 100 yards, would you rather have a parallax you can dial down to 25 yards or lower? What other features would you like to see on an adjustable parallax scope? How big of an objective would you want, 42,44,50 or 56mm?
My scope requirements are 1. 44mm or under, 2. adjustable parallax that will adjust down to 25 yds or less and 3. a 5x25 magnification range with a reticle that isn't too "crowded" with lines or dots.
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by TripleC View Post
My scope requirements are 1. 44mm or under, 2. adjustable parallax that will adjust down to 25 yds or less and 3. a 5x25 magnification range with a reticle that isn't too "crowded" with lines or dots.
... and I wish I could find this reticle in a good fixed-mag scope.



Not on every rifle of course. Most have a simple duplex reticle but there are a couple with this reticle in a variable-mag scope. I would prefer fixed mag but that appears to be a unicorn hunt.
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Old 09-20-2019, 01:23 PM
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Scopes rated for springer air rifles work very well on 22s. The 1" tube, AO, variable power, target turret, with max 40mm obj. will adjust down to 10m and on out made shooting my 22s tighten up the poi's. I like variables just in case I want to dial down power; truth is I tend to use em on up top. For some reason I seem to never find myself wishing I had less power on my scope; power is a good thing (lol). I guess I could recommend you get a variable with the mid-power you think you want, that way you can go up or down?
It was not long ago I discovered on my home 50yd range that I cant shoot any closer than the parallax error of my scopes, even on low powers, in spite of trying/thinking I was getting a consistent head/eye position behind the gun. I set up each of my rigs and all my unmounted scopes and did a 50yd visual test for reticule 'movement' relative to my eye position. I had a few that were fine for only minute of deer, and the fact is they were centerfire scopes intended for hunting not precise target work.
I have also gone to higher rings thus a more erect head position with a light cheeking of the stock rather than the oft mentioned 'cheek weld'. The less contact and influence I have on the gun the betters things seem to get. It is also hard to maintain a down hard and firm cheeking over a long course of fire session, fatigue becomes a factor, thus inconsistent technique.

Last edited by gcrank1; 09-20-2019 at 04:23 PM.
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Old 09-20-2019, 02:15 PM
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For me personally I won't buy a scope for one of my rimfire's that doesn't have AO. But I also do most of my shooting off the bench. If I were using them for small varmint or plinking a fixed AO would be fine. My idea of the perfect rimfire scope would be something like the Night Force BR 12-42◊ but with a low power of around 3◊ with the same body as a Weaver GS and the Varmint EBX reticle. Nothing crazy 😄
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Old 09-20-2019, 03:28 PM
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Parallax doesn't seem to be a problem unless you are shooting tiny targets or tiny groupn . I have a 2-7 VX-1 rimfire scope on an air rifle and can shoot ragged hole groups at 30 feet even tho it doesn't have an adjustable objective. I have one on a .22 that's as good at 25 yards. It becomes a larger problem at high magnification.
As for large objectives, I'd rather have a smaller scope with better optics. The lenses are more important that the objective size.
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Old 09-20-2019, 04:54 PM
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Smile

I have nothing to add except my preferences.

On any scope, I like compact size. I don't care what brand the scope is, if it is longer than 13" (I prefer 11-12) I'm not interested. That weight preference usually takes care of the weight issue.

I much prefer AO and even more so, side-focus. I want the AO to go below 25 yards. I prefer 10 yards. I won't even consider an objective lense greater than 42mm.

I find it quite difficult to find all these characteristics:
- A couple of older Leupolds that sell used for very high prices
- 3x9 Weaver R9
- Burris Timberline 4.5x14
- Nikon EFR 3x9x40

For years I used centerfire scopes on rimfire and didn't know squat about AO. Never knew I had a problem until I started "hanging-out" with folks who know more than me. (Like here for instance

I like those Weaver Grand Slams (never seen one except in pictures) but I found out about them too late; short, light, cool looking design, and AO.
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Old 09-20-2019, 07:40 PM
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As an avid air gun shooter, its no coincidence that air gun shooter shooting at typical airgun ranges from 10 meters to 25 yards invariably use an AO scope or side focus. At these close ranges, parallax is a serious issue. Even out to 50 yards, dialing in the perfect focus with an AO or SF, can be used as a range finder which is a benefit with the loopy trajectory can be used as a range finder which helps with the relative loopy trajectory of pellets. An AO or SF scope is almost standard equipment for an air rifle, now.
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Old 09-20-2019, 07:47 PM
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Do I wish my Leupold 3.5-10x50 had side focus?, you betcha! However it does have a fantastically adjustable illuminated + for night hunting, parallax adjusted to approx. 40 yds by me, and makes a great handle for carrying.
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