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  #1  
Old 05-09-2021, 08:12 PM
MikeMyers

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High Standard Lubrication



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I cleaned and lubed (minimal) my X-Series gun several days ago, and shot perhaps 100 round through it since then.

While looking for magazine information, I came across this page:
http://ashevillerifleandpistolclub.o...2-107-PTS1.pdf

The very first step was to lock open the slide, and clean/lightly lube the rail just in front of the slide. I tested my gun, and while it didn't feel especially dirty, it certainly didn't feel like it was rubbing on an oiled surface. So, I pulled the slide back, and put a drop of oil on each rail, ran the slide back and forth, then locked the slide open again and put a drop of oil on each side of back of the slide. Now it feels like it's running over butter!

The article I read long ago about maintaining a HS gun was to use minimal oil. Now I suspect I should repeat what I did, any time the slide stops feeling so smooth as it opens and closes.

One of my better friends tells me not to clean it too often, to let it get good and dirty before I do so.

Are there other places where you guys add any oil or grease? How frequently do you tear your guns down for cleaning?
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  #2  
Old 05-09-2021, 09:43 PM
1911
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Lube

sounds like you're on a good path. I confess I don't break my target pistols down and scrub like I should, but I don't compete formally. I have begun the routine of using compressed air and an acid brush on key surfaces like breech face, chamber, fed lips on mags, mag well, etc. Just knock off the big stuff, dry. Doesn't replace a tear-down/scrub, but You'd be amazed how clean a dirty gun comes using this method. I also run all my guns a little wetter than I probably should, (in fact I run my Victor's rails very wet)but none are the worse for wear and run fine. All moving surfaces get some lubrication. After driving myself crazy with different types of lubes, a few years ago I switched to plain old Mobil1 synthetic motor oil for every gun I own. Easy cleaning and never had an issue. Purchased anywhere, and a single quart has lasted me literally years. Only grease I use is on AR and Garand trigger groups.

Last edited by 1911; 05-09-2021 at 09:58 PM.
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  #3  
Old 05-10-2021, 08:25 AM
LDBennett
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No gun of mine is put back nto the safe without cleaning, no matter how many rounds I just fired!

There is no reason not to field strip the gun during cleaning. That means pull the barrel, remove the grips, remove the slid lock lever and spring, and remove the slide from the frame. Good old Hoppes cleans all metal surfaces. Be sure to clean out the cavity in the frame that houses the trigger group, Compressed air can blow out any powder particles caught there. I use an Otis bore cleaning system with their bore cleaner for the gun's bore. It is a plastic coated wire pulling a special patch through the bore from the breech to the barrel crown

Guns are machines with pretty tight clearances and as such need oil to avoid wear. Now, that does not mean drowning the gun in oil. But rather oiling surface that run against each other with a film of oil. Using a needle oiler with Hoppes gun oil, I put oil on the slide rails of the slide front to back. I put a drop of oil on the engagement surfaces of the sear/hammer and a drop on each pivot in all the gun's many rotating surfaces. I also rub a drop of oil on the part of the underside of the slide that cocks the hammer and rub it on. The bore gets a lightly oiled patch through it. The outside of the gun gets wiped down with a silicon cloth to remove any and all finger prints. After assembly the gun is wrapped in a silicon cloth and put back in its storage box.

I have many guns all get this kind of cleaning if possible. Hi Std's are easy to field strip and it should be done after every shooting session, in my opinion.

What is the trick to remove the barrel? Grip the gun normally and lay the barrel on a table top. Use your body to push the button against the edge of the table. Once the button breaks free then hold the gun by the barre with one hand (gripping it normally with the other hand), pushing the button with the thumb and lift the barrel off the frame. Lever take down guns are as easy as moving the lever and sliding the barrel off the frame. Allen screw takedown guns are simpler yet. Remove the Allen screw and lift the barrel off. In all cases it helps to lock the slide to rear during the barrel removal.

I never subscribed to the "shoot the gun until it is so dirty it fails to operate reliably" school. But I don't compete and value my many guns. I apply variation of the above process to all my many guns and have over the last 30+ years.

All this is my opinion and yours may vary.

LDBennett
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Old 05-11-2021, 12:53 AM
hamden
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"Are there other places where you guys add any oil or grease? How frequently do you tear your guns down for cleaning?"


The rails, yes
The hammer-sear surfaces with moly or the TW GREASE
The hammer pivot pins
The hammer front surface where the slide pushes back
The trigger pins especially in sear bar
Lightly under the sear bar
The rail bearing on the disconnector
Very very lightly inside the mags and all over the gun for protection
The sear pivot pin (very important)
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  #5  
Old 05-11-2021, 12:15 PM
mr alexander
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High Standard Lubrication

MikeMyers,

I started shooting Bullseye in a local league, way back in 1979. Between matches, I also practiced when time permitted. I continue shooting this discipline today on my own, as our league ended several years ago. My pistol always receives some cursory attention after coming home.

Back in the old days, a length of heavy monofilament fishing line was used to run patches through the bore. I now use a "Patchworm" to pull 3 patches through the barrel after every session. The first one is moistened with Breakfree CLP. The second, dry patch removes the now loosened fouling. A third, wet patch anoints the chamber and bore. This last application of CLP is left in the barrel so that it can continue to work on any remaining shooting residue that may still be present. Next, I moisten a Q-Tip with a little Breakfree and use it to wipe the feed ramp in the frame in addition to the breechfaces of the slide and barrel, leaving all of these surfaces wet. To prevent rust, the outside of the pistol receives a quick wipe down with a lightly oiled rag before it is stored.

Before the next shooting session, I use a wooden toothpick to clean out the corners of the "cartridge rim recess" in the breechface of the slide. This feature resembles an upside down letter "U". If a heavy amount of fouling is permitted to accumulate here, misfires may occur. The slide and barrel breechfaces get mopped up with a clean Q-Tip. Three clean patches are run through the bore to dry it out. I use a cotton swab to quickly clean the inside surfaces of my magazines. Brownells offers them with long, wooden handles which makes the job a snap. Search their website for this part number:885-861-500WB. If needed, some gun oil is placed on the frame rails, but only if they look dry.

Some people use bronze brushes to clean their chambers and bores. I have never had a need to use them in my barrel. The chemical action of the Breakfree CLP does all of the work for me when it comes to cleaning these areas. Some gunsmiths have said that rimfire barrels are made out of softer steels than their centerfire counterparts. This makes sense, as our ammunition is strictly loaded with lead bullets. If you feel that scrubbing really is required, a brush with nylon bristles would probably be the best way to go.

I like the "Patchworm" because it is made out of nylon. Its design does not incorporate metal components of any kind, making it very safe to use in a rimfire barrel. With the pistol's slide locked open, you can quickly and easily run patches into the chamber and out the muzzle. In this manner, the crud is pushed out and away from the slide and frame. If a cleaning rod is used on an assembled pistol, then the crud is pushed toward those parts. Bore snakes are okay, but must be regularly washed to remove the contaminants that can collect on them over time. That's why I prefer patches; use once and toss.

Some will say that a pistol's bore should be left dirty as doing so keeps it "seasoned", thus preserving the "0" that has been previously established. This has not been my experience. My zero remains the same week after week.

When first starting out in the league back in 1979, I would always fully field strip my pistols for cleaning after each and every use. The more experienced shooters informed me that this was totally unnecessary and only serves to accelerate the wear between the mating parts of a target-grade pistol. I will do a full field strip and deep cleaning, but only when the pistol really needs it. For me, that comes to about once a year or after every 5,000 rounds fired. The methods described above have served me very well for decades.

Regarding lubrication, I follow the procedures that "hamden" does.

Last edited by mr alexander; 05-11-2021 at 12:32 PM. Reason: Added information
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Old 05-11-2021, 12:47 PM
MikeMyers

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LDBennet
I agree - but if I have no time right then, the gun goes in the safe and I make a note that it needs cleaning. I don't always have time to clean right after shooting - but I know I should.

"I put a drop of oil on the engagement surfaces of the sear/hammer and a drop on each pivot in all the gun's many rotating surfaces.". Is there a drawing someplace that shows what you mean? I don't know the gun well enough to know where to rub.

I coated the end of the round "plug" with Wilson grease last time I removed the barrel. Today it came right off, with no effort.


Hamden: Well, I know where the rails are, and the hammer front surface, but I don't have a clue where the points are you noted for everything else. I guess I need to watch some videos again.


Mr Alexander:
I know most of what you mention, and am doing so. I haven't been using "Break Free CLP" - I think I bought it, and should try using it. I will order the Brownell's 885-861-500WB. As to "field stripping", I remove the barrel and slide, and do all my cleaning, then re-assemble. I don't go beyond that, as I don't know what to do (yet).
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Old 05-12-2021, 08:54 PM
frisky-maddog
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Don't forget to disassemble your magazines and clean them out as if you go to long it will effect feeding also. The 1st time I took one of mine apart I think I ended up with a complete bullet worth of debris, probably wasn't but there was alot of debris in there.
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Old 05-13-2021, 04:36 AM
hamden
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Here ya go Mike.
A layout of the internals with pins next to the pivot holes.


At one time HS had the hole in the front of the sear no doubt for that important lube
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Old 05-13-2021, 05:45 AM
MikeMyers

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Hamden, are these parts accessible for lubrication without having fully disassembled the gun?

I remove the barrel, then remove the slide, then start cleaning what I can see, and oiling the places that I think need it. I have never removed all those small parts from one of my High Standards.

Thank you for the photo - that's a start.

(Maybe I should look around for a worn-out High Standard that I can buy inexpensively, for the sole purpose of learning how it works, how to disassemble, and then re-assemble.)
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Old 05-13-2021, 07:32 PM
MikeMyers

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Before I re-assemble the gun for (hopefully) tomorrow's range trip, I was looking everything over. Both breech faces are spotless. I ran my finger over the rails in front of the slide, but not only were they totally dry, neither felt as smooth as I expected.

Last time I put a drop of oil on each rail in front of the slide, and a drop behind the slide, then ran the slide back and forth. I was rewarded for this effort by seeing loose oil on various parts of the gun the next day - so obviously I over-did it.

Since those surfaces need to be as free as possible, my current plan is to put a TINY drop of oil in front of and behind the slide, for each rail. I got to wondering what time of oil you guys use, and does it matter. Choices include Hoppe's gun oil, and "Break Free CLP" which is supposed to leave an oily residue when it dries.
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Old 05-15-2021, 01:46 PM
mr alexander
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High Standard Lubrication

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMyers View Post

I got to wondering what time of oil you guys use, and does it matter.
MikeMyers,

For lubing the rails, I use plain old gun "earl". The Hoppe's brand is a very fine

choice. When applying it to those rails, keep the tagline from the Brylcreem TV

Commercials in mind: "A Little Dab'll Do Ya!"
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Old 05-15-2021, 01:56 PM
MikeMyers

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Thanks - last time. I used Hoppe's in the small bottle with a metal tube, so I can better control how much is used. I did this on the rails, and behind the slide. After lubrication, everything feels so free, but a day or two later, it's not the same. Should this be done for every shooting session?
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Old 05-18-2021, 12:59 PM
mr alexander
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeMyers View Post
Thanks - last time. I used Hoppe's in the small bottle with a metal tube, so I can better control how much is used. I did this on the rails, and behind the slide. After lubrication, everything feels so free, but a day or two later, it's not the same. Should this be done for every shooting session?
MikeMyers,

Please see the last sentence in the third paragraph of Posting #5 above. Try to

manually cycle the slide a few times before heading out to the range. If "it feels

like it's running over butter!", you are good to go. If not, lube lightly. Oil is a

great lubricant to use. However, it tends to drain off and needs replacement

every so often.
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Old 05-18-2021, 04:43 PM
MikeMyers

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Victor: That's pretty much what I did: "If needed, some gun oil is placed on the frame rails, but only if they look dry." They certainly felt "dry", and with the tiny metal tube in the small bottle of Hoppe's, I put one drop on each rail, front and back.

One day later, today, the slide felt like it was supported by "butter", smooth as can be, so I left it as-is. I was rewarded with a perfect shooting session, 100% good feeding, and holes going into the target in a group the size of the 10-ring in a B-8 target at 25 yards. I need to adjust the sights one click upwards.

People came over to look at the Victor, and one of them called Alan while at the range, to place an order for a new X-Series gun. It was a very pleasurable day in every way.


Next time I take my X-Series, I'll do the same thing for lubrication, the evening before going to the range.

(I haven't yet learned how to lubricate the internal lube points pointed out earlier - not brave enough yet to take the gun that far apart. I will practice first on my 103.)
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Old 05-28-2021, 03:22 PM
MikeMyers

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A quick follow-up question.

Some friends of mine told me I should never take apart my gun for cleaning right before I go to a match. If it's working fine, maybe add a tiny amount more oil where needed, but that's it.

I used to think that before a match, I should go over it, making sure everything is clean.

I think the best advice was posted up above - any time I use the gun, when I get home I should clean it. But one of my best friends who is also a gunsmith disagrees - it's working fine, don't mess with it.


My next match is this coming Sunday. I took both my High Standards to the range today, to make sure everything was working. The Victor had one magazine that always worked, and for the other magazines, they usually worked. My X-Series was pretty much the same. I bought mineral spirits to clean out any gunk in the magazines, and got some Marvel Mystery Oil which Alan says is great for magazine lube. That might be a good project for tomorrow. I also got a tongue depressor, so I can more easily disassemble the magazines.

If nobody changes my mind about cleaning, I'll just do a routine cleaning like what I think I should do any day I take a gun out for shooting.
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