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  #1  
Old 06-20-2019, 08:21 PM
flangster

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How often do you update your reloading manuals?



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I just got an e-mail from Midsouth saying that the new Sierra manual is out -- Edition VI, I guess. I have their last edition, which I have used hard. Been through two binders for it, duct tape, ring-hole reinforcers, Scotch tape, you name it.

But out of interest, how often do you update your manuals? I have several, including Sierra, Lyman, Hornady . . . usually, I get a different one if it has references to powders than another lacks. And most recently, it was useful that the Hornady manual listed a variety of loads for .17 Hornday, which were missing from the other manufacturers' volumes.

But how do the rest of you do it? Skip an edition? Don't fix it if it isn't broke? Hope to inherit from your brother-in-law? Just curious. In my case, I might do it just to get the new binding. Dang, I'm hard on that book.
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Old 06-20-2019, 09:04 PM
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Reasons I get a new manual is if I want to use a new powder, a new bullet, or a new cartridge that wasn't included in the previous manual. If I'm happy with what I'm using, I think twice about upgrading manuals. Usually the current load data is just carried over into the new edition, it is seldom that I'll find a change to long standing powder and bullet data. Sierra is different because they don't release new manuals too often, so I'll probably get the new edition. I often skip other manuals that are updated every few years.

Tip: with the Sierra manual using perforated pages, you can move pages from the 5th edition binder to the new 6th edition; for example to preserve cartridge data that was in the 5th edition but deleted from the 6th edition.

Last edited by LeverGunFan; 06-20-2019 at 09:13 PM.
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Old 06-20-2019, 10:22 PM
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depends on what im doing.

If im just prepping brass, then no.

If im going to reload, then yes, but it will depend on what caliber/powder too.
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Old 06-20-2019, 10:52 PM
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Have you seen these?
http://www.loadbooks.com/index.html
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  #5  
Old 07-02-2019, 01:23 AM
Steve Newman

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Speaking of different versions/eras of loading manuals, have you noticed that the most modern/latest editions are slightly more conservative in their max loadings listed of identical cartridges using the same powder, than others from say, 20 or more years ago? Lawyer proofing?
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Old 07-02-2019, 08:23 AM
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Every 30 yrs I guess as my newest manual is about that old. I don't need a new manual to load the same load in a 222 or 308. Lol

Actually I have bought a few of the individual load manuals like aztarget suggested.
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Old 07-02-2019, 08:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Newman View Post
Speaking of different versions/eras of loading manuals, have you noticed that the most modern/latest editions are slightly more conservative in their max loadings listed of identical cartridges using the same powder, than others from say, 20 or more years ago? Lawyer proofing?
Yes. I have three editions of the Speer loading manual. Each newer edition is more conservative than the preceding. Are powders changing over time?
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Old 07-02-2019, 09:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Newman View Post
Speaking of different versions/eras of loading manuals, have you noticed that the most modern/latest editions are slightly more conservative in their max loadings listed of identical cartridges using the same powder, than others from say, 20 or more years ago? Lawyer proofing?
Yes, I have seen many loads are more conservative. I like that. On another total different line, I would like to see more safe reduced loads listed. I dont mean conservative, but good safe loads below that. You see that covered very well with the 45/70. For those new to this, (IMHO) the big risk in reloading is dangerous reduced loading. There was a recent exploded rifle incident at camp perry, that appears to be a detonation event from a reduced load. Well, case that is unsure. It does happen.

I also found there is information on line from some of the powder manufacturers.

I never thought about how often I feel the need for a new book. If this is a survey, my latest manual is Hornady 9th.
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Old 07-03-2019, 10:17 AM
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Can't beat having a real paper manual to open and lay out while reloading...but It's also hard to fault accessing all the manuals now on line.

I have 4 books on the shelf (latest is Barnes #4). Living in Ca (by wife's choice...she's worth it) I'm trapped into lead-free bullets for other than target time, so those manuals listing those bullets are more important to me. Every 4-5 years a new cover finds its way onto the shelf.
I also keep a 3 ring binder of printed on-line stuff and my loading records. I mean if you're on this forum you know the internet well enough to access all that and more.

The Hodgdon, Alliant and Ramshot websites appear to have their entire line of powders open to view and downloadable via PDF, plus the bullet specific sites like Barnes, Berger, Nosler, Speer and Hornady (to name but a few)... you're getting 'approved' factory tested load info same as buying the book, and updated info as well!

It still amazes me how far apart some manuals show same caliber/bullet combinations using the same powder...other than barrel length or altitude differences what is up with that?
Love to hear thoughts from better educated people than myself!

In my opinion a manual without pressure listings is not as complete as it should be just cause it's another way to compare like velocity with different powders and gun stress, If accuracy does not suffer why load to max pressure if a powder change would reduce that significantly?

I sure agree with fourbore...reduced loads can be fun, and a great way to introduce larger calibers to new shooters. I have a .223 load that uses a 30gr bullet at velocities just above 2000 fps for under 100 yard critter shots, why waste powder if you know your target's home is not a 400 yard open field?
Would love to see something published that just barely squeaks out the barrel and then 1-2 grain increased loads all the way up to the minimum loads normally published. I understand very reduced loads may produce weird pressure readings so I'd rather have the big boys do the testing.
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Old 07-03-2019, 11:24 AM
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If/when they fall apart, and Magic Mending Tape won't work any more!
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Old 07-03-2019, 12:02 PM
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Definitely if I'm using a bullet or powder not listed in an old manual, it's time for me to upgrade.

As powders do change over time, I'd be extra observant if you were using a load from a 20 year old manual but with new powder.

But with all loads, it pays to inspect every case for signs of over pressure - flat/cratered primers, stiff extraction, ejector marks on the case head. On loads you think might be "high pressure" you can measure case expansion after firing on new cases (measure before and after, and label on the storage box) to monitor.

Always better to safe than sorry.
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  #12  
Old 07-03-2019, 02:42 PM
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"How often do you update your reloading manuals?"

As often as I purchase new powders or new powder lots. That's often enough that I usually end up with each revision.

Less often it's to get data for a "new" cartridge - most recent eg. .375 Ruger.

New bullets are not so much a reason, except for monometals. Barnes has data online.
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Old 07-03-2019, 07:36 PM
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I use the online catalogs from the manufactures. I do own and keep current Hornady and the Lyman books. I compare the bullets lists to the powder lists to keep safe loads. I am a former "hot-rodder" and have some paperweights laying around from formerly good parts.

The reason for different charge weights from different sources is the difference in the bearing surface of different projectiles. As to difference over the years in powder has to do with 1- slight differences in the powders tested 2 - changes in how pressure tests are done.

Last edited by JDWinCO; 07-03-2019 at 07:37 PM. Reason: fat fingers and light strikes make poor readability.
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Old 07-04-2019, 06:11 AM
Samuel_Hoggson
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There was nothing slight about the burn rate variations I've seen with IMR-4831.

3300 fps+ for a 180 gr .300 Win (24") at well below "book" max charge. It should have given about 2900 and change. Next increment gave sticky bolt lift which led to the chrono tests.

Bearing surface variations (which also affects load density) do matter. But you don't need a new edition manual for that unless the design is new.
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Old 07-04-2019, 09:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fourbore View Post
Yes, I have seen many loads are more conservative. I like that. On another total different line, I would like to see more safe reduced loads listed. I dont mean conservative, but good safe loads below that. You see that covered very well with the 45/70. For those new to this, (IMHO) the big risk in reloading is dangerous reduced loading. There was a recent exploded rifle incident at camp perry, that appears to be a detonation event from a reduced load. Well, case that is unsure. It does happen.

I also found there is information on line from some of the powder manufacturers.

I never thought about how often I feel the need for a new book. If this is a survey, my latest manual is Hornady 9th.
Hodgdon says that you can down load H4895 to 60% of the listed max load for a given cartridge/bullet and be safe. I use that on all my calibers except 223 which recoil is not an issue.

I only have Hornady and Berger manuals and both are the latest. I get the Hodgdon magazine style every other year or so.

David
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