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Old 03-08-2015, 11:39 PM
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Ruger Bolt Install- the DrGunner Card Trick



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Hey Folks- first off, let me say that I have a full set of Gunsmither 10-22 tools, and I absolutely LOVE them.
If you work on these rifles and you don't have a set, I strongly suggest you take a look at Joe's website and pick up a set. Joe's a great guy, a longstanding, loyal RFC sponsor and has produced some of the most ingenious innovations for working on and building these rifles. His Bolt Bar is THE BEST WAY to install the bolt and charging assembly if you're not experienced with doing so. I and I'm sure many reading this can pop a bolt and CH in and out of a 10-22 in our sleep. That said, it isn't all that easy when you're starting out, and use of the proper tool for the job not only makes it easier, but helps AVOID MARRING OR DAMAGING your rifle. Gunsmither's Safety Tool is indispensable if you ever need to service the safety on a Ruger trigger group. The Gunsmither Barrel Block and new design featuring a beddable recoil lug are proof that Joe is always thinking of new innovations for the platform.

The purpose of this thread is to share a trick I developed when teaching my kids how to install the bolt in a 10-22 receiver.

The DrGunner Credit Card Trick

First off, you need an old credit card or gift card. They're made from different thicknesses, you want one firm enough to do the job but not too heavy or it will get wedged between the bolt and receiver- this will make sense when you actually try this trick.
With a sharp knife like a Utility knife, mark a 90 degree line about 1/4" from the end of the card. Cut the end off of an old credit card or gift card to remove the *rounded corners* and create nice 90 degree corners.

It turns out the height of a credit card is THE PERFECT LENGTH to hold a 10-22 charging assembly fully open.

This trick works with factory and aftermarket charging assembly's, factory and aftermarket bolts, and factory and aftermarket receivers- with only one issue-

When using it on a matched aftermarket receiver with CNC bolt, such as Kidd/Kidd, tolerances are very tight. It works, but requires use of as thin a card stock as you can that will still hold the charging handle back.

I have successfully used it with Ruger, Tactical Innovations, Rimfire Technologies, Heier Custom and several styles of Kidd charging handles.

I've also successfully tested it on Ruger, Tactical Innovations, Heier Custom, JWH Custom and Kidd bolts.

Finally, Ive successfully tested it on Ruger, Tactical Machining, Kidd, Tactical Machining and Razor receivers.

Below are a series of pics describing what I mean on a Kidd charging assy in a TM receiver.

First, cut off the card as described above.



Next, install the charging assembly in the receiver. Pull the charging handle all the way back. The act of grabbing and pulling the charging handle back without the bolt in the receiver places an eccentric load on the charging handle, causing it to lever and scrape along the charging rod. I've found it best to start with the barreled action upside down on the bench. First, I pull the charging handle back about 1/2", then place the tip of my RIGHT index finger on the leading edge of the charging handle at its center inside the receiver, and push it all the way back. At this point, I hook my LEFT index finger onto the charging handle outside the ejection port, with my thumb hooked around the back of the receiver. I'm able to hold the charging assembly with the spring fully compressed with my left hand only.

*It would be at THIS POINT that the credit card is installed.*

Then I install the bolt, rear first and pushing the front down onto the charging assembly.
Then, while hold gentle downward pressure on the front of the bolt, slowly release the charging handle. It will click into it's slot in the bolt, then maintain pressure to ensure that the bolt drops in above the ledge that defines the inferior margin of the ejection port.

*The only difference using the card is that you will need to hold downward pressure on the bolt while working the card free from between the bolt and receiver.*

Rocking the card front to back works best. As I said, in some applications there is little to no room for the card trick to work, and a Gunsmither Bolt Bar is best used.

Personally, I only use this trick to teach my kids, and they both use it to assemble thier 10-22s because their hands are too small and lack the strength needed to assemble the action without help.

The rest of the pics are self explanatory.











After you've removed and installed a 10-22 bolt enough times, you'll be able to pop it in and out quickly and consistently with your left hand on the charging assembly and right hand on the bolt with no problems.

Hope this helps-

DrGunner
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Last edited by DrGunner; 03-09-2015 at 01:24 PM.
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Old 03-09-2015, 07:04 AM
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Thanks for the excellent post, which should be a sticky.

The only thing I can add is what I teach about pulling the bolt handle back: Put the right thumb on the rear of the receiver and the right index finger on the center of the leading edge of the bolt handle. Pull the bolt handle back with the right hand while using the left thumb and index finger to put a slight forward pressure on the outside of the bolt handle - just enough to straighten the handle on the guide rod and prevent binding.
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Old 03-09-2015, 11:27 AM
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Call me crazy, but I've never found it that difficult to install the bolt, so I just haven't seen a need for the gunsmither tool. Not that it's not awesome, and I may want one in the future when my hands get a little less useful with age, but for now it's just seemed like a luxury. This, on the other hand, I can get behind. I've got plenty of old credit cards or gift cards available.
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Old 03-09-2015, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by farmertoo View Post
Call me crazy, but I've never found it that difficult to install the bolt, so I just haven't seen a need for the gunsmither tool. Not that it's not awesome, and I may want one in the future when my hands get a little less useful with age, but for now it's just seemed like a luxury. This, on the other hand, I can get behind. I've got plenty of old credit cards or gift cards available.
You're not crazy- I have not had trouble with it going back about 30 years.

That said, with all the aftermarket receivers and CNC bolts out there that are built to different tolerances and are longer, the room behind the ledge that supports the bolt is less than an OEM Ruger receiver and bolt. That makes it a darn site more difficult as you have to keep the charging handle compressed 100% to get the bolt in place with a very little wiggle room. I posted this to make it easier for newbies to the forum to get the job done, plus it certainly is a boon to young ones learning to assemble their rifles as their hands are so much smaller and lack the strength necessary to do what we take for granted.

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Old 03-09-2015, 12:02 PM
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Originally Posted by DrGunner View Post
You're not crazy- I have not had trouble with it going back about 30 years.

That said, with all the aftermarket receivers and CNC bolts out there that are built to different tolerances and are longer, the room behind the ledge that supports the bolt is less than an OEM Ruger receiver and bolt. That makes it a darn site more difficult as you have to keep the charging handle compressed 100% to get the bolt in place with a very little wiggle room. I posted this to make it easier for newbies to the forum to get the job done, plus it certainly is a boon to young ones learning to assemble their rifles as their hands are so much smaller and lack the strength necessary to do what we take for granted.

DrGunner
I've never owned an aftermarket receiver or bolt honestly, so that probably explains why I haven't had an issue. I do plan on slowly building a new KIDD rifle, part by part (vs buying all the parts at once, or a complete rifle from KIDD), so maybe I'll run into this challenge yet.

Either way, thank you for taking the time to share this with us all! It's what I love most about this place.
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Old 03-09-2015, 12:46 PM
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Originally Posted by farmertoo View Post

Either way, thank you for taking the time to share this with us all! It's what I love most about this place.
Me Too, Brother- in fact it's just that feeling that has inspired me to post my projects and share what I know and do and help out moderating here.

In fact, what I've given back to this community is far outweighed by what I have gained and learned here.



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Old 03-09-2015, 01:18 PM
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Now..if ya cut/trim the card to the height of the Rec. wall you can now turn the Rec upright and thump in on padded but firm surface to drop the bolt right out.
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Old 03-09-2015, 01:20 PM
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Now..if ya cut/trim the card to the height of the Rec. wall you can now turn the Rec upright and thump in on padded but firm surface to drop the bolt right out.
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Old 03-09-2015, 02:36 PM
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Now..if ya cut/trim the card to the height of the Rec. wall you can now turn the Rec upright and thump in on padded but firm surface to drop the bolt right out.
Brilliant! I'll pass that on to one of my shootin' buddies who was apparently born with ten thumbs!
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Old 03-11-2015, 10:51 PM
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great idea gunner !!!
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Old 05-28-2015, 06:04 PM
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All receivers are not created equal

While I never had a problem with my 25 year old sporter with 10's of thousands of rounds through it, I just pulled apart a new out of the box 50 anniversary model and it was a bear to get back together. Between the tight[er] tolerances or lack of wear, I could have used this trick last night. Also contributing were the abundant and awful mill marks in both the receiver and bolt. This is going to need some work.

Side note question, I pulled it apart to install a Kidd guide rod and 10% lighter spring and could not get the bolt back far enough with the factory bead between the spring and the charging handle so I left it out. Also, I did not crimp the guide rod to keep the charging handle on the rod when disassembled. I would appreciate your thoughts on the bead and crimping the guide rod,
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Old 05-28-2015, 06:44 PM
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Originally Posted by dunnjp2000 View Post
While I never had a problem with my 25 year old sporter with 10's of thousands of rounds through it, I just pulled apart a new out of the box 50 anniversary model and it was a bear to get back together. Between the tight[er] tolerances or lack of wear, I could have used this trick last night. Also contributing were the abundant and awful mill marks in both the receiver and bolt. This is going to need some work.

Side note question, I pulled it apart to install a Kidd guide rod and 10% lighter spring and could not get the bolt back far enough with the factory bead between the spring and the charging handle so I left it out. Also, I did not crimp the guide rod to keep the charging handle on the rod when disassembled. I would appreciate your thoughts on the bead and crimping the guide rod,
I don't use the bead with Kidd rods, and the crimp is not necessary. Easier to clean the components when you can disassemble them.

Even if you wanted to, I doubt you COULD put a crimp in the Kidd rod. It's tool steel with 70c Rockwell hardness... It would damage most punches to even try.

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Old 05-29-2015, 06:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrGunner View Post
I don't use the bead with Kidd rods, and the crimp is not necessary. Easier to clean the components when you can disassemble them.

Even if you wanted to, I doubt you COULD put a crimp in the Kidd rod. It's tool steel with 70c Rockwell hardness... It would damage most punches to even try.

DrGunner
Thank you Dr.
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Old 05-31-2015, 11:31 AM
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Thanks for sharing this tip.

I had no trouble with a stock Ruger bolt & receiver but I recently acquired a Tactical Innovations receiver & bolt which has ridiculously tight tolerances. I'm certain that the card trick will help make reassembly a lot easier.

Last edited by Rod Blackburn; 10-20-2015 at 09:27 PM.
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Old 10-20-2015, 07:45 PM
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Both my 10/22 rifles rejected my credit card.
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