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  #1  
Old 07-28-2011, 10:06 AM
ss1
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52 Bolt Disassembly tool



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Where do one get the 52 Bolt Disassembly tool, the one that no longer on ebay, but can be made from a phi screwdriver? Does anyone have the dimensions to make this tool??? Your help will be appreciated. thanks
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  #2  
Old 07-28-2011, 10:23 AM
Seewin
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For a quickly made tool, use a 1/4" dia shank Phillips screwdriver. Cut the business end off square. Cut a 1/8" wide slot in the end that is approximately 1/4" deep. These shanks are normally fairly hard, so you will likely need to use an abrasive cut-off blade in a die grinder or such to cut the slot. Dimensions of slot are not critical, you are just making a clearance slot to straddle firing pin guide pin.That's all there is to it.
Here is a set of instructions that I put together this morning that should help. Hope they are clear enough and that I have not left anything out.
Steve

WINCHESTER MODEL 52 BOLT DISASSEMBLY

Disassembly For “A” Models And Prior:
1. Secure bolt vertically in padded jaws of your vise, with the handle approximately ¾” above the top of vise jaws to allow removal of Bolt Handle Locking Plate Pin.
2. Using a 3/32” drive pin punch, remove the plate retaining pin, by driving it downward.
3. Slide the Bolt Handle Locking Plate from the bolt handle
4. Now, secure bolt body horizontally in your vise, leaving the handle end protruding from the end of vise jaws, and flats on bolt body front end pointing down, as it would be located in the receiver. This orientates the Firing Pin Guide Pin horizontally, which will be important when you remove it in the later steps.
5. Remove Firing Pin Plug Screw, being careful not to damage the screw slot. This requires a screwdriver with a maximum .035” thick blade. (screw slot measures .035” wide)
6. Pull back on bolt handle as far as it will go, and insert your bolt handle spacer between bolt body shoulder and bolt handle shoulder. This will expose the .120” dia. Firing Pin Guide Pin in bolt body.
7. Compress firing pin spring using compression tool.
8. Using a 3/32” dia. drive pin punch, and while compressing Firing Pin Spring, drive the Firing Pin Guide Pin down through and out of the bolt body.
9. Now slowly release tension on the Firing Pin Spring.
10. The balance of the bolt can now be disassembled by pulling firing pin with spring from bolt body, and sliding the bolt handle off bolt body.
11. I do not normally remove the extractors unless there is a definite need. They can usually be cleaned thoroughly with spray solvents, toothbrush and compressed air w/o removing them. If you decide to remove them, make sure you note which extractor and spring goes on each side of bolt body. There are RH & LH extractors and springs! The extractor retaining pin is approximately .080” dia., so it will require a relatively short 1/16” drive pin punch. I usually drive these out from the bottom because of the flat surface to start the punch.
12. Reassembly is just the reverse of the above steps. I use a good grade of bolt grease on the handle stub of bolt body prior to assembly. Use only a small amount. This will lubricate the thrust and rotation surfaces of bolt handle when assembled. I wipe the components down with light oil prior to assembling just to prevent rust. Pay particular attention to not getting any grease inside bolt body or firing pin assembly. This will slow down firing pin, especially in cold weather and have a detrimental effect on ignition. I also put a very small amount of bolt grease on the camming surfaces of body/firing pin.

Disassembly for “B” models and later:
This is exactly the same as above procedure except for the removal of the Bolt Handle Retaining Plate, which is not used on these later models.

Steve
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Old 07-28-2011, 10:46 AM
ss1
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Thanks Steve, just what I needed.
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  #4  
Old 07-28-2011, 10:59 AM
Seewin
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Here are some pictures of the bolt tools I have made for myself. My compression tool is a little more elaborate then the one I have described previously. Mine is heat treated and is designed to compress the firing pin spring with the threaded collar and holding it in the compressed position. This makes a 2-handed job out of what normally takes 3 hands. This tool is made for use on a B or later bolt. The prior models require a different collar because the firing pin threads/head design is somewhat different.
The spacer is just a piece of bronze milled to the correct thickness to hold bolt handle back while removing firing pin guide pin. Note it has an additional slot cut in bottom of radius to allow clearance for pin when it is pushed out. Nothing critical on this except for the width of spacer.







sembly/IMG_9569.jpg[/IMG]


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Old 07-28-2011, 05:30 PM
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Here is another thread with another tool:

https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums...ht=disassembly


Brer Rabbit
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Old 08-09-2011, 10:03 AM
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Winchester 52 bolt take down tool

http://www.barnesgunparts.com/winche...e-down-to.html
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  #7  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:18 PM
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Steve:

In step 4, it say to secure the bolt body horizontally in the vise.

What is the importance of having the bolt oriented like this ? I don't know of anyone that has a vise which is mounted so that the jaws move in a VERTICAL direction (up & down).

Most vices that I have seen around here are all mounted so that the jaws open up in a horizontal direction but NOT vertically.

Step - 4. Now, secure bolt body horizontally in your vise

Thanks.
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  #8  
Old 03-28-2013, 04:22 PM
Seewin
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I thought my instructions were to put bolt body horizontally in vise jaws as opposed to putting the bolt body vertically in vise. I'm not sure how you came up with "vertical vise jaws" . I also think there is a picture which show's the body in my vise.
Steve
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  #9  
Old 03-29-2013, 11:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seewin View Post
I thought my instructions were to put bolt body horizontally in vise jaws as opposed to putting the bolt body vertically in vise. I'm not sure how you came up with "vertical vise jaws" . I also think there is a picture which show's the body in my vise.
Steve
Steve:

In part step #4 says "and flats on bolt body front end pointing down".

Wouldn't the only way to accomplish this, be to have a vise mounted so that its jaws opened and closed vertically ? Thus making it possible for you to clamp the front downward FLAT part of the bolt in the jaws of the vise with the flat of the front of the bolt facing downward toward the ground/floor.

I don't seem to see a photo of the vise or at least enough to be able to tell how the vise is mounted.

Thanks.

Last edited by wpshooter; 03-29-2013 at 11:05 AM.
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  #10  
Old 03-29-2013, 02:38 PM
Seewin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wpshooter View Post
Steve:

In part step #4 says "and flats on bolt body front end pointing down".

Wouldn't the only way to accomplish this, be to have a vise mounted so that its jaws opened and closed vertically ? Thus making it possible for you to clamp the front downward FLAT part of the bolt in the jaws of the vise with the flat of the front of the bolt facing downward toward the ground/floor.

I don't seem to see a photo of the vise or at least enough to be able to tell how the vise is mounted.

Thanks.
Never thought taking apart a bolt would be so complicated. "Flats on bolt body front end pointing down" would be just as they are positioned in rifle with bolt closed. Nothing complicated, whatever works for you. It really does not matter which way the flats are pointing. The object of the process is to have easy access to the retaining pin in bolt, so it can be punched out with pin punch. I use a simple bench vise with padded jaws for this.
Steve
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  #11  
Old 12-30-2014, 09:11 AM
52DH&R12

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Turbo Tool

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Works great on the 52C, D, & E's that I tried it on. I would make the access hole a little bigger as it sits on an angle while in the tool. Bolt needs to be un-cocked to access the pin.

George
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  #12  
Old 01-05-2018, 02:58 PM
Mark4470

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Do any of you know if the 10x action bolt tool will work for a 52d-e bolt?
Thanks
Mark
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  #13  
Old 01-05-2018, 03:51 PM
vlnbyr

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10-X and turbo tool are the same.
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  #14  
Old 01-05-2018, 04:11 PM
Mark4470

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Quote:
Originally Posted by vlnbyr View Post
10-X and turbo tool are the same.
Thanks John. I’ve had a turbo that was in stock for three weeks, time to do something else!
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  #15  
Old 01-05-2018, 04:56 PM
vlnbyr

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Most all of us are using custom springs turbo and 10-X. Not sure it is all that necessary but that's how the BR world is.
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