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Old 08-11-2007, 10:32 AM
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Exclamation Scope help needed



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Hey yall. I have a H&R Sportster .22WMR that I am interested in scoping. However, I have little experience with scopes, with the exception of using one or 2 scoped rifles that were already sighted in. I have no clue how exactly to work with a scope, as far as sighting it in is concerned. I understand that one adjustment knob is used to windage and the other for elevation, but know little about about scopes, there power, etc. If someone could run me through the basics and recommend a good scope I would appreciate it.
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Old 08-11-2007, 11:03 AM
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Yep, scopes are their own arcane science. First the nomenclature...

Scopes are typically described with something like 2-7x28mm. The numbers in front of the "x" show the magnification level of the scope. If there is only one number it is a fixed power scope. If there are two numbers in front of the "x" separated by a dash it is a variable power scope with the numbers giving the lowest and highest magnification levels. So 2-7x28mm is a 2 to 7 power scope with a 28mm objective lens. The ring that adjusts from one magnification level to another is usually at the end of the scope nearest to your eye.

The number to the right of the "x" is the diameter of the objective lens. As a general rule, bigger lenses give you brighter, clearer images. There is a break even point where the extra size adds little. That break even point is about 44mm so you don't need anything wider than that. How much smaller than 44mm it can be is related to the magnification level of the scope because of a factor called "exit pupil."

Exit pupil is what makes a scope "bright" and is a factor in how close you have to get your eye to the scope to see through it. Bigger is better. To figure out how big the exit pupil is, divide the size of the objective lens by the magnifcation level, so a 40mm lens at a mag level of 12 would have an exit pupil of 3.3mm. If your max mag level is only 9 then you can get the same brightness out of a 32mm lens (32 / 9 = 3.56) as the 12 power scope gets out of a 40mm lens. So, by extension, if you want lots of magnification you need a 44mm lens; if you want, say, 9x or less you can happily use a 32mm lens.

The next factor to consider is "parallax." A scope is focused to be parallax free at a given range. For discussion, let's say it is 100 yards. What that means is that the reticle (crosshairs) and a target at 100 yards are both on exactly the same visual plane. If you put the center of the reticle right on the "x" in the center of the target at 100 yards and then move your head around without moving the scope the reticle will stay right on the "x" --. there is no parallax. But if you now put the reticle on the "x" of a target at 50 yards and try the same trick you will see a slight movement in the reticle as you move your head around. If your eye is left of perfect center the reticle will look like it is to the right of the "x," and so on; there is parallax or, more properly, there is a parallax error. If you have parallax error you can't be sure your reticle is in the right place unless you get your head in exactly the same place each and every time you put your eye behind the scope. Obviously, you want to eliminate parallax error. How do we fix this? Two answers.

The first is to get a scope that is focused (parallax free) at the mid-point of the ranges we shoot most often. For a rimfire, say, we shoot at 25 yards to 100 yards so we want the scope focused at about 50 - 75 yards, and that is where rimfire and air rifle scopes are focused to be parallax free. You will still have a very small parallax error but it will be at the extremes of your ranges and not in the middle. Depending on the type of shooting you do this may be perfectly acceptable. Most "big bore" scopes are focused to be parallax free at about 125 yards and will have significant parallax error at the ranges typically used by rimfire shooters.

The other solution is to have a scope that you can focus to the exact range you are shooting at that moment; this is what an "adjustable objective lens" does for you. It is usually just called "adjustable objective" or "AO." Most often, scopes with AO have that designation added to the end of their description, such as 3-9x40mmAO. Most AO scopes use a focusing ring right on the objective lens. If the scope is a fixed power scope the focusing ring is sometimes at the end of the scope nearest the eye. Sometimes it is on the side of the scope.

Big bore scopes with AO usually focus down to 50 yards. Rimfire scopes have to get to much shorter ranges than that; how short a range they focus to is one measure of their quality so you always want to ask what their minimum focus range is. You certainly don't want one that stops at 50 yards if you plan to shoot at 25 yard targets. Most I have seen get down to 10 yards but it is something you have to check.

The next consideration is just how much magnification you need. If you are doing what I call "precision target shooting" at 100 yards you want lots of magnification. What I mean by "precision target" is that you are trying to get five shots into an area smaller than a 1" square or circle. To do this you need enough magnification to know for certain your reticle is precisely on the same aimpoint each and every time you pull the trigger. For this kind of work I would say 12x is a miniumum; 16x is better. I use 24x on my rifle that I use for this kind of shooting and think that is about as high as I need to go.

If you are doing that kind of shooting at 50 yards, with even smaller targets, I would say 9x is the absolute minimum and 12x would be better.

At the other end of the magnification level discussion we have hunting and plinking. Here, too much magnification is a hindrance because of the smaller field of view. High mag levels--> small field of view --> trying to find Mr. Rat while looking at the world through a soda straw. On the other hand, low mag levels--> wide field of view--> using a paper towel roll.

Again, range comes into play. If your hunting targets show up at 50 yards you can probably get by with a 4x scope. If they pop up at 25 yards you probably want a 2x, a "red-dot" scope, or no scope at all. If they are fast movers (rabbits) you need a wide field of view--> low power or red-dot or no scope, whereas stationary targets (squirrels hanging out near the top of a tree, rabbits lounging under bushes at longer distances) can get by with slightly less field of view--> more power.

Next up is the type of reticle. Duplex reticles have a wide crosshair that narrows down to a skinnier crosshair where they cross. But there is skinny and then there is skinny. The standard duplex crosshair will completely hide the X on most targets at 50 and 100 yards, so you don't know if you are aiming at the top of the "x," the middle of it, or at the bottom.

For super precise aiming you want "target crosshairs" or "fine crosshairs" that show you exactly where on the X you are aiming. These hairs look smaller than a pencil line at 100 yards, allowing you to dot the "i" on the fine print at the bottom of the target. But, as usual, there is a tradeoff -- fine crosshairs can disappear in dim light when you are trying to aim at Mr. Rabbit when he is standing against a dark background. Even in good light they are sometimes hard to find in a hurry, and almost impossible to keep sight of when following a moving target through the scope.

Most (but not all) mil-dot reticles use fine crosshairs, as do "target dot" reticles.

Even though it is not the best for precise target shooting, I prefer the standard duplex reticle. Sometimes it frustrates me when I'm going for small groups at 100 yards, but I see it is a good "general purpose" reticle suited to the type of shooting I usually do.

And lastly is the type of adjustment knob you want. Target style knobs are taller, can be turned by hand instead of requiring a coin or screwdriver, and are made to be adjusted frequently. If you move from a 25 yard target to a 100 yard target you just crank the knob the proper amount in the proper direction, put your crosshairs on the center of the target and shoot.

Hunter style knobs are made to be set and forgotten about. You sight in at your most frequent or desired range and if your target changes range you just aim over or under as needed to get the bullet where you want it.

Okay, where does that leave us? Maybe here:

Plinking at the occasional soda can, informal bull's eye matches or "small group" competition at 50 yards now and then, with the occasional long shot at that can 100 yards away? Then 2-7x or 3-9x or 4-12x will do for a variable magnification scope; and 4x or 6x will do if you want a fixed power scope. An objective lens of 28mm - 33mm will do just fine, but 40mm might be better if you go with 4-12x.

Regularly target shooting at ranges out to 100 yards or beyond? Then you'll want 16x or better along with a larger objective lens (40mm or more) to make up for the high mag level.

Shooting mostly at one range in one session? Hunter knobs.

Shooting at many different and very different ranges during one session? Target knobs.
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Last edited by Sophia; 08-23-2017 at 09:57 AM.
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Old 08-11-2007, 11:11 AM
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I have no clue how exactly to work with a scope, as far as sighting it in is concerned. I understand that one adjustment knob is used to windage and the other for elevation...
To mount the scope, first separate your rings. Some rings are made as matched sets so you don't want to get the top of one matched with the bottom of the other. You also want to keep the "front" aligned, so that one side of the top always stays lined up with that side on the bottom ring, etc. So, before beginning, mark each ring half with a bit of masking tape in such a way that you can keep them matched properly.

Next, mount the lower half of the rings to the spots on the rail or dovetail where you think they will end up. Put your scope in the lower half of the rings then loosely attach the upper half of the rings. You want the scope to move back and forth in the rings fairly easily but you want the rings clamped well enough on the rifle and to the scope that you don't drop the scope off and onto the floor while you're moving the rifle around.

Now set the scope to its highest magnification level and hold the rifle as though you are shooting it. If you will do most of your shooting from a standing position, do this standing up. If you expect to do most of your shooting from a bench, sit down at the bench. Now move the scope back and forth until the eye-relief is just right. When you have it "just right," the image you see through the scope will completely fill the eyepiece. If you see a dark shadow around the rim of the eyepiece or if it looks like you are looking down a long tunnel you are not "just right." Gently lift the scope up a hair and push it fore or aft until you get the image to completely fill the eyepiece. When you get that done, snug the top half of the rings just a little, to keep the scope from shifting, then put the rifle down and pick it back up, get your cheek weld, and recheck to make sure the eye-relief is just right. Do this until you are satisfied the scope is properly positioned fore-and-aft.

Right now, the scope is positioned where you want it when it is turned up to max magnification level. You have more room to play with in terms of eye-relief and position of the eye when the scope is turned down to lower mag levels but you want to make sure that you will still be able to get your head in a comfortable position when dialed down to the low magnification. Set the scope to its lowest magnification level and see if you can get a comfortable cheek weld while getting a proper view through the scope. If not, move the scope as necessary. Hopefully you can get the scope in a position where the eye-relief works for both high and low magnification. If you have to choose one over the other, choose the one you think you will use most often.

You might find you have to move the rings from the spots where you originally put them while you are doing your adjusting. If so, tighten down the halves of the ring you are not moving so that it will trap the scope where you want it while you adjust the other ring. Don't forget to loosen that ring back up before you start sliding the scope back and forth again.

Once you have the scope where you want it, tighten the rings to the rail or dovetail. But before moving on to tighten the ring halves together, make sure your crosshairs are perfectly aligned on the horizontal and vertical planes. They make a special gizmo to help with this, a sort of level that is used by the gun shop when you pay them to boresight a scope. I've learned to do it myself by aiming the scope at a line I know to be level, or the vertical wall of distant building (which should be more-or-less plumb), lining up the crosshairs on the line, and then twisting the rifle while holding the scope level so that the vertical crosshair perfectly bisects the bore. It will take some trial and error, but you can do it. Later, at the range, you can shoot a "vertical line test" to fine tune if necessary.

Once you have that done, tighten the upper half of the rings to the lower half. When tightening the ring halves, do them little bit at at time (like the lug nuts on a car) and try to end up with an equal amount of gap between the ring halves all the way around. Watch to make sure the scope does not twist itself out of level while you are tightening things down and check to make sure the crosshairs are still level and plumb when you finish.
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Last edited by Sophia; 07-02-2014 at 10:55 PM.
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Old 08-11-2007, 11:19 AM
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To sight in the scope, you want as stable a firing position as possible and, generally, fairly accurate (consistent) ammo. You want at least some kind of front rest. Set up a target about 25 yards out to get started. Ideally your target should have some vertical and horizontal lines on it; a grid pattern is perfect. Use a small level to make sure the lines on the target are level and plumb when you staple the target to its holder. Of course, you want to do that downrange; you don't staple the target and then carry it down range!

Now that you are sure your target lines are plumb and level, you can be sure your rifle is plumb and level when you line the crosshairs of your scope up on the grid lines. Among other things, this makes sure a "left" adjustment on your scope really moves things left, and not left and up, for example.

If you have a bolt-action rifle, start by pulling out the bolt and getting the rifle situated in the rest so it is pointed at the middle of the target. Peer down the bore (from the chamber end!) and try to get the center of the target lined up in the center of the bore. It doesn't have to be exact but the closer the better. Once that is done, look through the scope to see where it is pointing. If it is not pointed at the middle of the target, use the adjusting knobs on the scope to steer the reticle to the the center of the target. Note that things are going to appear to work backwards -- if you want to steer the crosshairs to the left, you will have to turn the dial in the direction labeled "right;" if you want to steer the crosshairs up you will have to turn the dial in the direction labeled "down." Depending on how much wiggling around the rifle does while you are fiddling with the scope, you might have to do this more than once.

Once you have the scope adjusted so it is pointing the same place the bore is pointing, install the bolt, get in a good firing position, and take a shot at the intersection of two lines on the target. After the shot, get the scope lined up back where you had it aimed. Now, without moving the rifle, look through the scope as you move the crosshairs by using your adjustment knobs. You want to move the crosshairs from where you were aiming to where the bullet actually hit.

Now shoot three or five shots at an intersection of lines. Find the center of this group of shots and, using the same technique as above, adjust your scope from your aiming point until it is centered at the center of the group you just fired.

Now move your target out to the range you want your scope sighted in and shoot a 3 shot group. Again, make sure your target is plumb and level and, again, adjust your crosshairs to the center of the group. By now you should be close enough that you're just fine tuning by figuring out how many clicks on the knob you need to move and doing it that way instead of steering the crosshairs while looking through the scope. That is to say, use the markings on your knobs in the "normal" way -- if you want to move the point of impact to the right, turn the knob in the direction labeled "right." Etc.

Good luck
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Old 08-11-2007, 03:03 PM
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Wow..........

I vote to make this a sticky, good job Sophia.
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Old 08-11-2007, 04:27 PM
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Thanks, I really appreciate the help. I am probably going to end up going with a Simmons .22 MAG scope.
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Old 08-11-2007, 07:29 PM
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Wow..........

I vote to make this a sticky, good job Sophia.
That gal is da bomb when it comes to explaining things!, I agree sticky time!
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Old 08-11-2007, 08:18 PM
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That gal is da bomb when it comes to explaining things!, I agree sticky time!

Before I finished reading the posts I was thinking this should be a "Sticky"

I have been shooting (for fun and food) for more than 50 years and that is the best bunch of information on scopes I have ever read..

Thank you Sophia!
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Old 08-12-2007, 01:04 AM
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I just signed up to this forum and I have to agree that this was exactly the kind of information I was looking for whenever I came here. This offers great information in easy to read and understand format for newbies like me.
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Old 08-12-2007, 10:54 AM
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Thanks for the kind words, guys. I'm glad you found it helpful.

Quote:
...easy to read and understand format for newbies...
That's because I'm so new I still still see things through a newbie's eyes
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Old 08-01-2008, 11:57 PM
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STICKY STICKY STICKY STICKY STICKY!!!!!!!
i searched for hours and didnt find this anywhere and believe me this is exactly was what i was looking for as for the one that is stickied it doesnt even come close to what a new to shooting person needs to know
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Old 10-10-2008, 10:26 PM
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New Scope Bible

I'm buying my first variable scope for a new CZ tomorrow and I have to say I found this post just in time to save me from my own ignorance of scopes. This post is now printed out so I can study it in detail tonight. I am going to splurge on a variable Leupold and now I feel I have a better understanding of what kind of scope to get.
I have stapled the print out pages together and until something better comes along, this is the Bible on scopes for me. Thank you RFC and special thanks to you Sophia.
Tomorrow I will shop with confidence.
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Old 02-08-2009, 11:44 PM
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Thanks for these informative posts...... way to go Sophia...... very helpful


What! No Sticky Yet? Come on guys, help a newbie out.


STICKY! STICKY! STICKY! STICKY! STICKY!
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Old 11-11-2009, 09:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
Yep, scopes are their own arcane science. First the nomenclature...

Scopes are typically described with something like 2-7x28mm. The numbers in front of the "x" show the magnification level of the scope. If there is only one number it is a fixed power scope. If there are two numbers in front of the "x" separated by a dash it is a variable power scope with the numbers giving the lowest and highest magnification levels. So 2-7x28mm is a 2 to 7 power scope with a 28mm objective lens. The ring that adjusts from one magnification level to another is usually at the end of the scope nearest to your eye.

The number to the right of the "x" is the diameter of the objective lens. As a general rule, bigger lenses give you brighter, clearer images. There is a break even point where the extra size adds little. That break even point is about 44mm so you don't need anything wider than that. How much smaller than 44mm it can be is related to the magnification level of the scope because of a factor called "exit pupil."

Exit pupil is what makes a scope "bright," and is a factor in how close you have to get your eye to the scope to see through it. Bigger is better. To figure out how big the exit pupil is, divide the size of the objective lens by the magnifcation level... so a 40mm lens at a mag level of 12 would have an exit pupil of 3.3mm. If your max mag level is only 9, then you can get the same brightness out of a 32mm lens (32 / 9 = 3.56) as the 12 power scope gets out of a 40mm lens. So, by extension, if you want lots of magnification you need a 44mm lens; if you want, say, 9x or less, you can happily use a 32mm lens.

The next factor to consider is "parallax." A scope is focused to be parallax free at a given range. For discussion, let's say it is 100 yards. What that means is that the reticle (crosshairs) and a target at 100 yards are both on exactly the same visual plane. If you put the center of the reticle right on the "x" in the center of the target at 100 yards and then move your head around without moving the scope, the reticle will stay right on the "x"... there is no parallax. But if you now put the reticle on the "x" of a target at 50 yards and try the same trick, you will see a slight movement in the reticle as you move your head around. If your eye is left of perfect center, the reticle will look like it is to the right of the "x," and so on... there is parallax or, more properly, there is a parallax error. If you have parallax error, you can't be sure your reticle is in the right place unless you get your head in exactly the same place each and every time you put your eye behind the scope. Obviously, you want to eliminate parallax error. How do we fix this? Two answers.

The first is to get a scope that is focused (parallax free) at the mid-point of the ranges we shoot most often. For a rimfire, say, we shoot at 25 yards to 100 yards, so we want the scope focused at about 50 - 75 yards... and that is where rimfire and air rifle scopes are focused to be parallax free. You will still have a very small parallax error, but it will be at the extremes of your ranges and not in the middle. Most "big bore" scopes are focused to be parallax free at about 125 yards and will have significant parallax error at the ranges typically used by rimfire shooters.

The other solution is to have a scope that you can focus to the exact range you are shooting at that moment... this is what an "adjustable objective lens" does for you. It is usually called just "adjustable objective," or "AO." Most often, scopes with AO have that designation added to the end of their description, such as 3-9x40mmAO. Most AO scopes use a focusing ring right on the objective lens. If the scope is a fixed power scope, the focusing ring is sometimes at the end of the scope nearest the eye. And sometimes it is on the side of the scope.

Big bore scopes with AO usually focus down to 50 yards. Rimfire scopes have to get to much shorter ranges than that -- how short a range they focus to is one measure of their quality so you always want to ask what their minimum focus range is. You certainly don't want one that stops at 50 yards if you plan to shoot at 25 yard targets. Most I have seen get down to 10 yards but it is something you have to check.

The next consideration is just how much magnification you need. If you are doing what I call "precision target shooting" at 100 yards you want lots of magnification. What I mean by "precision target" is that you are trying to get five shots into an area smaller than a 1" square or circle. To do this you need enough magnification to know for certain your reticle is precisely on the same aimpoint each and every time you pull the trigger. For this kind of work, I would say 12x is a miniumum, 16x is better. I use 24x on my rifle that I use for this kind of shooting and think that is about as high as I need to go.

If you are doing that kind of shooting at 50 yards I would say 9x is the absolute minimum and 12x would be better.

At the other end of the magnification level discussion we have hunting and plinking. Here, too much magnification is a hinderence. It goes back to the discussion of "exit pupil"... high mag levels--> small exit pupil --> trying to find Mr. Rat while looking at the world through a soda straw. On the other hand, low mag levels--> big exit pupil--> using a paper towel roll.

Again, range comes into play. If your hunting targets show up at 50 yards, you can probably get by with a 4x scope. If they pop up at 25 yards you probably want a 2x, a "red-dot" scope, or no scope at all. And if they are fast movers (rabbits) you need a wide field of view--> low power or red-dot or no scope, whereas stationary targets (squirrels hanging out near the top of a tree) can get by with slightly less field of view--> more power.

Next up is the type of reticle. Duplex reticles have a wide crosshair that narrows down to a skinnier crosshair where they cross. But there is skinny, and then there is skinny. The standard duplex crosshair will completely hide the "x" on most targets at 50 and 100 yards, so you don't know if you are aiming at the top of the "x," the middle of it, or at the bottom.

For super precise aiming you want "target crosshairs" or "fine crosshairs" that show you exactly where on the "x" you are aiming. These hairs look smaller than a pencil line at 100 yards, allowing you to dot the "i" on the fine print at the bottom of the target. But, as usual, there is a tradeoff -- fine crosshairs can disappear in dim light when you are trying to aim at Mr. Rabbit when he is standing against a dark background. And even in good light they are sometimes hard to find in a hurry, and almost impossible to keep sight of when following a moving target through the scope.

Most (but not all) mil-dot reticles use fine crosshairs, as do "target dot" reticles.

Even though it is not the best for precise target shooting, I prefer the standard duplex reticle. Sometimes it frustrates me when I'm going for small groups at 100 yards, but I see it is a good "general purpose" reticle suited to the type of shooting I usually do.

And lastly is the type of adjustment knob you want. Target style knobs are taller, can be turned by hand instead of requiring a coin or screwdriver, and are made to be adjusted frequently. If you move from a 25 yard target to a 100 yard target you just crank the knob the proper amount in the proper direction, put your crosshairs on the center of the target and shoot.

Hunter style knobs are made to be set and forgotten about... you sight in at your most frequent or desired range and if your target changes range you just aim over or under as needed to get the bullet where you want it.

Okay, where does that leave us? Maybe here:

Plinking at the occasional soda can, informal bull's eye matches or "small group" competition at 50 yards now and then, with the occasional long shot at that can 100 yards away? Then 2-7x or 3-9x or 4-12x will do for a variable magnification scope; and 4x or 6x will do if you want a fixed power scope. An objective lens of 28mm - 33mm will do just fine, but 40mm might be better if you go with 4-12x.

Regularly target shooting at ranges out to 100 yards or beyond? Then you'll want 16x or better along with a larger objective lens (40mm or more) to make up for the high mag level.

Shooting mostly at one range in one session? Hunter knobs.

Shooting at many different and very different ranges during one session? Target knobs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
To mount the scope, first separate your rings. Some rings are made as matched sets, so you don't want to get the top of one matched with the bottom of the other. You also want to keep the "front" aligned, so that one side of the top always stays lined up with that side on the bottom ring, etc. So, before beginning, separate your rings (or mark them with a bit of masking tape) in such a way that you can keep them matched properly.

Next Loosely mount the lower half of the rings to the spots on the rail or dovetail where you think they will end up. Put your scope in the lower half of the rings then loosely attach the upper half of the rings. You want the scope to move back and forth in the rings fairly easily but you want the rings clamped well enough on the rifle that you don't drop the scope off and onto the floor while you're moving the rifle around.

Now set the scope to its lowest magnification level and hold the rifle as though you are shooting it. Move the scope back and forth until the eye-relief is just right. (if you see a dark shadow around the rim of the eyepiece, you are not "just right"). Put the rifle down (without doing anything to the scope) then pick it back up, get your cheek weld, and recheck to make sure the eye-relief is just right. Do this until you are satisfied the scope is properly positioned fore-and-aft.

Now set the scope to its highest magnification level and do it all over again. Hopefully you can get the scope in a position where the eye-relief works for both high and low magnification. If you have to choose one over the other, choose the one you think you will use most often.

You might find you have to move the rings from the spots where you originally put them while you are doing your adjusting. Tighten down the halves of the ring you are not moving so that it will trap the scope where you want it while you adjust the other ring. Don't forget to loosen that ring back up before you start sliding the scope back and forth again.

Once you have the scope where you want it, tighten the rings to the rail or dovetail. But before moving on to tighten the ring halves together, make sure your crosshairs are perfectly aligned on the horizontal and vertical planes.

They make a special gizmo to help with this, a sort of level that is used by the gun shop when you pay them to boresight a scope. I've learned to do it myself by aiming the scope at a line I know to be level, or the vertical wall of distant building (which should be more-or-less plumb), and lining up the crosshairs on the line, and then twisting the rifle while holding the scope level so that the vertical crosshair perfectly bisects the bore. It will take some trial and error, but you can do it.

Once you have that done, tighten the upper half of the rings to the lower half. When tightening the ring halves, do them little bit at at time (like the lug nuts on a car) and try to end up with an equal amount of gap between the ring halves all the way around. Watch to make sure the scope does not twist itself out of level, and check to make sure the crosshairs are still level and plumb when you finish.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
To sight in the scope, you want as stable a firing position as possible and, generally, fairly accurate (consistent) ammo. You want at least some kind of front rest. Set up a target about 25 yards out to get started. Ideally your target should have some vertical and horizontal lines on it.... a grid pattern is perfect. Use a small level to make sure the lines on the target are level and plumb when you staple the target to its holder. Of course, you want to do that downrange... you don't staple the target and then carry it down range!

Now that you are sure your target lines are plumb and level, you can be sure your rifle is plumb and level when you line the crosshairs of your scope up on the grid lines. Among other things, this makes sure a "left" adjustment on your scope really moves things left, and not left and up, for example.

Get in a good firing position and take a shot at the intersection of two lines on the target. After the shot, get the scope lined up back where you had it aimed. Now, without moving the rifle, move the crosshairs by using your adjustment knob. You want to move them from where they are to where the bullet actually hit.

Now shoot three or five shots at an intersection of lines. Find the center of this group of shots and adjust your scope until it is centered at the center of the group.

Now move your target out to the range you want your scope sighted in and shoot a 3 shot group. Again, make sure your target is plumb and level. And, again, adjust your crosshairs to the center of the group. By now you should be able to say, "I need to go 1/2" left, so that is two clicks on the adjusting knob."

As for adjustments, if the shot went left of where you were aiming you move the adjuster towards "right"... the arrows on the scope are marked as though you are steering the bullet hole towards the aimpoint.

Good luck
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Originally Posted by Sophia View Post
Thanks for the kind words, guys. I'm glad you found it helpful.



That's because I'm so new I still still see things through a newbie's eyes
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Old 11-18-2009, 10:54 PM
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Sophia

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Thanks for these informative posts...... way to go Sophia...... very helpful
Thanks again, guys, for the kind words. I'm glad you're still finding them and finding them useful. Just an FYI, clicking on that icon in my signature line will get you back here as well as other places you may find interesting.
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Last edited by Sophia; 08-14-2017 at 05:58 PM.
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