The Colt Woodsman pistol - a retrospective - Page 4 - RimfireCentral.com Forums

Go Back   RimfireCentral.com Forums > >

Notices

Join Team RFC to remove these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #46  
Old 01-31-2017, 05:18 PM
Chubbo
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Mar 2002
Location: 
Ohio
Posts: 
157
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)


Log in to see fewer ads
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedrin View Post
First gun I ever bought with my own money was a Huntsman. My grandfather had one new in box and it had never been fired. When it came to divvying up his things, I took the S&W K22 revolver and another relative took the Huntsman. I think we both felt we got the better end of the deal. Recently he passed away and his daughter sent me the gun. She hadn't known grandpa so it had no sentimental value to her and she knew grandpa and I had been shooting buddies. I opened the package and found it had been stored in a very moist place and the gun is COVERED in rust. A project for when I can find the time.

This is the Huntsman I bought. I love this gun.



Hedrin:
I have a "1958" Colt Huntsman, that came with black plastic grips. I've been trying to find a pair of wood grips to use in place of the plastic ones. Your post showing one side only, of your Huntsman with wood grips, look like what I would like to find, but, I would like to see a picture of the other side of your Huntsman, to see how the right grip is configured. Could I get you to post a picture of the right side of your Huntsman? I'm guessing that the right grip will have the same, unneeded round cutout for a slide release button that the black plastic grips on my Huntsman has. Thanks.
Chubbo
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 01-31-2017, 05:48 PM
Blaze
US Army Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
May 2008
Location: 
vermont
Posts: 
241
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Chubbo. FYI I have a 1961 Colt Huntsman with walnut grips (Have had a 1956 Huntsman with plastic grips with the cutout). The right side walnut grip does not have a cutout for the magazine release (not needed for the 3rd series ) and has the same checkering design as the left side. Hope this helps.
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 01-31-2017, 07:44 PM
Hedrin

Join Date: 
Feb 2016
Posts: 
24
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chubbo View Post
Hedrin:
I have a "1958" Colt Huntsman, that came with black plastic grips. I've been trying to find a pair of wood grips to use in place of the plastic ones. Your post showing one side only, of your Huntsman with wood grips, look like what I would like to find, but, I would like to see a picture of the other side of your Huntsman, to see how the right grip is configured. Could I get you to post a picture of the right side of your Huntsman? I'm guessing that the right grip will have the same, unneeded round cutout for a slide release button that the black plastic grips on my Huntsman has. Thanks.n
Chubbo
The "good" Huntsman is down in the safe, but the rusty Huntsman is handy and is basically the same gun. I think around 1974. Hopes this helps.

Reply With Quote
  #49  
Old 02-02-2017, 12:01 PM
Chubbo
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Mar 2002
Location: 
Ohio
Posts: 
157
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedrin View Post
The "good" Huntsman is down in the safe, but the rusty Huntsman is handy and is basically the same gun. I think around 1974. Hopes this helps.

Hedrin:

Thanks so much for taking the time to post pictures of both sides of your 6" "1974 Huntsman. It shows me what I would really like to find for my older 4.5 "1955" Huntsman, but, probably never will find.
Chubbo
Reply With Quote
  #50  
Old 02-02-2017, 12:39 PM
Hedrin

Join Date: 
Feb 2016
Posts: 
24
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chubbo View Post
Thanks so much for taking the time to post pictures of both sides of your 6" "1974 Huntsman. It shows me what I would really like to find for my older 4.5 "1955" Huntsman, but, probably never will find.
Chubbo
Glad it helped! Cheers.
Reply With Quote
  #51  
Old 02-02-2017, 06:48 PM
Hedrin

Join Date: 
Feb 2016
Posts: 
24
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chubbo View Post
Hedrin:

Thanks so much for taking the time to post pictures of both sides of your 6" "1974 Huntsman. It shows me what I would really like to find for my older 4.5 "1955" Huntsman, but, probably never will find.
Chubbo
Try one of these...

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/618292740

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/618095451

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/617932141

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/618095357

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/605507865

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/614033639
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 05-10-2017, 03:13 PM
MountainMinstrel

Join Date: 
Jan 2012
Posts: 
2
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Talking filed serial #

I just inherited my Fathers 1924 Huntsman. problem is that the serial # on the frame has been filed off. However the #'s on the slide and the housing are there and match. The gun is not in very good shape so I'm not that concerned with resale value, but I am concerned about the legality of this gun in the wonderful gun friendly state of California.

Any help, even a point in the right direction would be very helpful.

Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 06-20-2017, 11:02 PM
snofrog

Join Date: 
Jun 2016
Posts: 
3
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
My Woodsman
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 1911 and woodsman.jpg (197.9 KB, 304 views)
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 07-01-2017, 12:17 PM
NorthwetChooter's Avatar
NorthwetChooter

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
Olympia, Washington
Posts: 
849
TPC Rating: 
100% (5)
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofrog View Post
My Woodsman
Nice looking Colts snofrog! Thanks for sharing
__________________
🔫 Buy em, and choot em!! 😎
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 07-01-2017, 12:22 PM
NorthwetChooter's Avatar
NorthwetChooter

Join Date: 
Feb 2015
Location: 
Olympia, Washington
Posts: 
849
TPC Rating: 
100% (5)
Here's my 1948 second series sport I picked up a few weeks ago.



And the sport with my 1977 third series target model. I love these old woodsman pistols and half the fun is learning about the different models and the many nuances that exist. I'm actually waffling on a Match Target right now. I might have three of these soon

__________________
🔫 Buy em, and choot em!! 😎

Last edited by NorthwetChooter; 07-08-2017 at 09:19 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 12-22-2017, 08:07 PM
Snigley
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2017
Location: 
Texas Gulf Coast
Posts: 
48
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
I'm envious! I picked up a 1948 Woodsman Sport recently in Tulsa and got home before noticing it was built before they started putting adjustable sights on them. Now I've got to go buy another Woodsman.
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 12-22-2017, 10:31 PM
huntsman22

Join Date: 
Apr 2007
Location: 
Deer Trail, CO.
Posts: 
1,672
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MountainMinstrel View Post
I just inherited my Fathers 1924 Huntsman.
Huntsman production didn't start until 1955........
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 04-30-2018, 12:49 PM
doubs43
US Air Force Veteran NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2008
Location: 
Middle GA, USA
Posts: 
5,090
TPC Rating: 
100% (2)
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofrog View Post
My Woodsman
I don't see "Woodsman" on your pistol. I suspect that it's a pre-Woodsman made before 1927. It also has replacement grips as the pre-Woodsman all had walnut grips... the earliest with a diamond and later all checkered.

The pre-Woodsman pistols are beautifully made and yours looks to be a very nice example.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 08-21-2018, 09:42 AM
Snigley
NRA Member - Click Here To Join!

Join Date: 
Apr 2017
Location: 
Texas Gulf Coast
Posts: 
48
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
My first Handgun

Here's a photo of my first baby. It's one of the first things I purchased when I started working 1972. At the time I felt like I was paying a fortune for it as it was nearly a full week's pay. It was so nice that I had a hard time shooting it so I usually still took my Dad's out when I went shooting.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Woodsman Post.jpg (207.0 KB, 5 views)
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 02-20-2019, 08:56 AM
noelekal

Join Date: 
Feb 2011
Posts: 
77
TPC Rating: 
0% (0)
Some may have seen this before as it was shared elsewhere. Was originally penned to talk more about the Heiser holster, but the Woodsman I have here is featured too.







When my friend Cres Lawson began to rapidly loose his vision due to macular degeneration he asked me if there were a few of his guns that I'd like to have. I'd long admired his Colt Woodsman which had provided him with such enjoyment and was the basis for some of his stories. He'd given it a lifetime of careful use and loving care. He'd purchased the Woodsman in the summer of 1928 while working at the William Crites gun shop in downtown San Antonio, Texas.

Cres worked at Mr. Crites shop several years, always in the summer between semesters of attending a military school in Kerrvile, Texas and latter when attending the University of Texas (where he studied under and came to personally know J. Frank Dobie of Texas literature fame). Of course Cres spent a lot of his earnings in the shop. I have the honor of owning several of these purchases.

Cres wanted a good quality .22 pistol to compliment the Colt New Service Model 1909 .45 Colt his father purchased for him from the San Antonio Arsenal in 1920. The family had a huge ranch deep in Mexico and spent a couple of months down there each winter hunting deer, collecting the rents and crop payments from the Mexican tenants. A young man could have a time with a .22 pistol while roaming the ranch.

Mr. Crites didn't have a Woodsman in stock but told Cres he'd order one. By and by it arrived and Cress was excited to see it. Mr. Crites told Cres that he''d have to charge him full retail price on this particular purchase. Cres had been used to the generous discount that Mr. Crites had always provided but didn't quibble and respectfully paid the $32 price for the pistol. He though it a bit strange but said no more about it. He dedicated himself to shooting only ammunition featuring noncorrosive priming (recall that Clean-Bore priming had only come out the year before) in the gun and cleaning it with Winchester Crystal Cleaner. He purchased a Heiser holster and a Boyt leather, fleece-lined, zippered pistol case for his new .22 pistol. He and the pistol went on to have many adventures in Mexico and on their ranch in Kerrvile.

Fast forward to 1994 when he offered to sell his treasured Colt to me. It was in excellent used condition. I offered him $600 for the pistol and he said "no, I only paid $32 for it brand new. You can have it for $200." I said "no, that isn't fair to you. It's an outstanding example of a Woodsman and you've kept it so well that you should receive a fair price. I'll give you $500 for it. "Naw" he said. "It's only shooter and I want you to have it. I'll take $300 for it." "Now Cres, that's not right" I said. "That gun in that condition is worth every bit of $600 on the present market. Would you at least take $450 for it. I'd be honered to have it to remember all your tales and you know it'd be going to a good home." He replied "you're the only other person I've ever seen that was as fastidious about his gun maintenance as I am. I want you to have it and I won't take more than $400 for the gun". The deal was done. We were to go through this same pattern of "reverse bargaining" several more times on his fine firearms.

I queried him in detail about the history of the Woodsman, the purchase and some of the tales he'd told, writing them down. Some 66 years later he was still puzzeled why Mr. Crites had made him purchase the pistol for full list price.

A year or two later I got around to ordering a factory letter from Colt. The day it arrived I excitedly took the envelope to Cres's house so we could share its contents. The letter cleared up the matter of the retail price for Cres when I read it aloud to him. He chuckled satisfyingly. The letter said the Woodsman was shipped to the Topperwein Hardware Company, San Antonio, Texas in June of 1928. Cres explained.

"Back then Ad Topperwein of Winchester exhibition shooting fame ran a gun shop around the corner from Mr. Crites' establishment in downtown San Antonio. They were friendly competitors and frequented each other's shops almost daily when Topperwein wasn't out of town with his shows. A back alley connected the two shops. Many times on slow days we three would sit around talking business, politics, guns and hunting. It is obvious that Mr. Crites only went around the corner to Topperweins to get me that Woodsman. Topperwein must have charged him full price so he charged me."

Cres got a big kick out of finding out why the Woodsman was so costly.

He passed away in November of 2001 at 95 years of age. He was my best gun crony. I've got the Woodsman and some great memories and stories to go with it. The opportunity to share a factory letter from a firearm from the "classic"days of firearms manufacturing with the original owner was almost unique and was an event that I wouldn't take for.





Cres originally purchased a Brill holster to fit the Woodsman, purchased from A.W. Brill's shop in Austin, Texas. Both Cres and his father had traded there on occasion plus Cres was in Austin from 1927 to 1932 attending the University of Texas. The Brill, a holster which Cres waxed enthusiastic about, was later left in Mexico on one of the Lawson family visits to their ranch west of Cuidad Victoria. There the holster got away from him. So, he ordered this Heiser sometime later on.



The Hermann H. Heiser Saddlery Company almost lasted a hundred years, from 1858 to 1955, turning out very well-respected leather goods of all kinds. Hermann H. Heiser was born in Saxony the year of Texas' hard won independence from Mexico. He immigrated to America and by 1858 had opened a saddlery and harness business. He apparently made quality leather goods and he had a good head for business as well for the company prospered. He brought his sons into the business and when he died in 1904, they continued operating it for many years afterward. A better history than I can offer is provided in this link: Hermann H. Heiser Saddlery Company History and Maker Marks - www.vintagegunleather.com California

No man ever lived long enough to wear out a Heiser Holster

Cres always spoke of the Heiser holster line as being the premium line of gun leather back in the day. He did reserve a special place of top honor for the comparatively scarce Brill holsters. Perhaps this was because he traded in their shop and he and his dad knew the Brills personally. The Heiser holsters I've examined are very good holsters, made of high quality leather, near as thick as saddle skirting. No scrimpy thin wallet leather here. They are well-formed and ruggedly stitched. Though the newest Heiser is now over 70 years old now, the leather is generally found to be supple, is not found to be rotten, and the holsters remain serviceable. Any holster leather can break down when used and abused but Heiser holsters are generally found to be remaining in better condition than many more modern makers from the 1950s forward that one may see in collections of used holsters offered for sale.

Cres' Heiser holster has seen a good bit of use. I don't know its exact age but am guessing late 1930s/early 1940s. Heiser changed their maker's mark in the early 1920s and this holster features the later mark. Heiser snaps were of brass, amply large and decorated with the Heiser logo, all art deco in style, up until the late 1920s or early 1930s. It's possible to have a Heiser holster with the later style maker's mark but having the large brass Heiser-adorned snaps so there was overlap of these features for a few years in the 1920s. Later, the snaps became smaller, were of stamped steel construction, dark brown enamel painted and more simply marked "Heiser." Even later, the Heiser marking on the snaps was deleted which is the style seen here. Last style of snaps appear to be bright metal.

Heiser gun leather - Life is too short to take chances!



Cres never scrimped on what he termed "cheap-jon guns" or on accessories. The Colt Woodsman came to me in a vintage Boyt fleece-lined leather zippered pistol case. I don't know its age but am guessing it to be from the 1930 to 1950 time period. The Woodsman always lived in this case when Cres had it, the pistol carefully preserved in a coat of RIG so that's the way the Woodsman lives in my safe.












Old pamphlet advertising the Toepperwein's (spelled Topperwein in the text) Winchester shooting exhibition.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:09 AM.

Privacy Policy

DMCA Notice

Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Optimisation provided by DragonByte SEO (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2000-2018 RimfireCentral.com
x