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Old 01-09-2018, 08:43 PM
tfrank
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Smile Another 1915 Favorite...



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Another 1915 Favorite brought back to shooting condition!!! Ya'll are going to have to wait for pictures, which I will add later, but for the time being I am just going to describe what was done to bring this rifle back to shooting condition, Oh and some of the interesting issues encountered along the way!!! About the only thing left to do is to remark the caliber designation to 22 LONG RIFLE, then I can call up the owner and tell him to stop on by and collect his Favorite!!!
Problems with the rifle as I received it...
1.) Frosted and mildly pitted bore over its entire length, kind of shoots a pattern like a shotgun, not a group like a rifle. The obvious solution... reline it. Oh but wait there are a few other things!!!
2.) The 12-36tpi screw that supports the breech block, well the threaded hole in the receiver that it goes into... its stripped out. Ok, I've repaired issues like that before, I think I can handle it.
3.) It's kind of able to cock, but it's weird. Oh and there is no half cock. I'll have to evaluate that one. Not sure what's going on with that issue.
4.) And its chambered in .25-Stevens, which means there may be FP issues to resolve.
5.) It has a case of "lever droop". Well that's ok, my 1894 had the same condition!!! I think I can handle that also!!!
The issue that worried me the most was the stripped out screw hole in the receiver. On my 1894 that was relatively easy to resolve. Run a 12-32 tap through the stripped out hole and viola it's repaired. AND I can now install a larger screw to support the breech block instead the dinky little 10-30 screw that Stevens put in it as original equipment. Well Stevens was listening to its customers and their complaints about the 10-30 screws bending and shooting loose. This late model 1915 had the upgraded breech block screw, and of course it's also an oddball thread pitch... 36 threads per inch. No problem, my lathe can cut that!!! Started to look for a 12-36 tap. Guess what??? I couldn't find one ANYWHERE. I got mad at first, but then I thought about it for a while and I decided that I was looking at it all wrong. This was an OPPORTUNITY to try my hand at making my very own custom 12-36 tap. I got over confident on the first tap as things just seemed to be going so well. I didn't check often enough and I made it about .003' under size. That's a big deal on a small tap, so I set it aside and started another one. I went slower on this one, and I was able to turn it down to the exact diameter that I wanted. Then the fun part of cutting the flutes on those taps. Small needle files and a dremel did a passable job at fluting the two taps. Next step case harden them. Tested the hardening with a file and the file just slid off of those taps like they were glass!!! Perfect. I hoped. Drilled a piece of scrap steel and tried out my taps. They worked!!! The smaller, undersized tap was used first, but the 12-36 screw acted like it wanted to go in but it wouldn't. Tried the slightly larger tap and the screw went in perfectly. A bit snug but I liked that as it ought to prevent it from ever working loose as it was being shot!!!

So once I was sure that my home made taps would work it was on to fabricating a "threaded bushing" as a means to restore the original scew size and pitch. As I said in the picture... I don't remember the diameter or the thread pitch that I used for the outside of the bushing, but as you can see it worked!!! And of course I had to add an inset to show off my beautiful home made tap. Beautiful because it cut great threads... at least twice!!!
God Bless, Frank.

Last edited by tfrank; 01-09-2018 at 09:17 PM. Reason: added picture!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 01-09-2018, 10:42 PM
tfrank
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Smile So to continue this!!!

So to continue this!!! The picture below shows part of what I found when I got into the receiver. From the looks of things the rifle had been dropped at some point in the past. At least this is my guess based on the damage to the internal parts, then it looked like someone tried to fix it without understanding what had actually happened, that the top of the trigger had been snapped off. But this is all supposition on my part. This unknown person also did a bit of file work on the hammer, but luckily no real damage!!!

So after I figured out what the problem was, I talked to the owner and he decided to get some good used parts. Only problem with that was the parts that he sent me were in worse condition than his original parts so we decided to work out a deal. I agreed to rebuild his original parts as they were the ones in better condition. The picture below shows his original trigger after I had repaired it. Left it a little beefier than my original unaltered trigger. It even has a nicer, lighter trigger pull, and I suspect that it is stronger also!!!

The picture below is a comparison of the hammer that was original to this rifle, next to the hammer from my 1915 Favorite. My hammer is on the right. You can see the extra notch that our unknown tinkerer of the past filed in the original hammer. Because of the fact that the trigger was short due to being broken it could not engage either the original half cock notch or the full cock notch, the trigger was just too short. But it could engage the newly filed notch. The only problem with this new trigger/hammer geometry was that when you loaded the rifle and closed the lever the hammer would SNAP closed against the breech block. I can see a real possibility that several rounds were accidentally fired because of this "repair". This "fix" allowed the hammer to rest on the back of the breech block, actually the firing pin in the breech block, which of course would have been resting directly on the rim of the rimfire cartridge. Rebuilding the original trigger restored the original trigger/hammer geometry and function, and the only thing I had to do was smooth out and polish the full cock notch. This unknown tinkerer of the past did reduce the depth of the full cock notch, slightly but other than that the hammer was fine!!! In fact the slightly reduced depth of the full cock notch is, I believe, partly responsible for the nice crisp trigger that this rifle now has!!!

Both the hammer and the trigger were re case hardened since metal had been removed and added back and I wanted nice hard wear resistant surfaces on all sear surfaces!!!
Ok time for me to get to bed, I will continue this later!!!
God Bless, Frank.

Last edited by tfrank; 01-10-2018 at 06:20 PM.
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Old 01-11-2018, 11:19 PM
tfrank
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Next step is the...

Next step is the lever bushing. The original bushing was loose. Don't know if it was the original bushing or a replacement from some point in the past, but whatever it was it was loose. If you turned the lever over and gave it a light tap on a wooden table the bushing would fall out. So another part to fabricate and install. In the picture below the original bushing is sitting on top of the lever and the newly fabricated bushing is installed in the lever. I was also able to tighten things up a bit as I made the hole in that bushing a bit closer to the diameter of the lever screw, so a bit of slop or clearance was eliminated!!!

As the captions say... that is a new breech block with a new Firing Pin. The link was also a new part but I reused the original link pins as they were a nice snug fit with very little play or slop in them. Between ALL new screws, a new breech block and a new link quite a bit of the slop or looseness that was in the action was eliminated. So the action locks up nice and snug now!!! As an added bonus the new breech block was for a 22 caliber rimfire, instead of a 25 caliber rimfire which was the original caliber. That saved quite a bit of worry on my part, and possibly work, particularly if the firing pin location had to be moved which I had to do on a different Favorite.
God Bless, Frank.

Last edited by tfrank; 01-11-2018 at 11:22 PM.
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:13 AM
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Very nice work Frank! You do a good job at keeping some of these old guns in the system.
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Old 01-12-2018, 05:18 PM
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Always interesting Sir.
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Old 01-12-2018, 07:09 PM
tfrank
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Well it would be a shame...

Quote:
Originally Posted by grg View Post
Very nice work Frank! You do a good job at keeping some of these old guns in the system.
Well it would be a shame not to save these old rifles. I think the design is classic even though it is not as strong as a true falling block action, these actions are certainly more than adequate for 22 LR, 17 Mach2 and apparently the 22 WRF!!! I don't know why but since tbjr posted pics of his Favorite in 22 WRF I have suddenly developed a hankering for a Favorite in 22 WRF!!! Just what I need... another project. I already have about a dozen unfinished rifle projects.
God Bless, Frank.

Last edited by tfrank; 01-12-2018 at 08:44 PM. Reason: punctuation!!!
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Old 01-12-2018, 07:43 PM
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Very nice Frank, thanks for the step by step descriptions and pictures!

Frank
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:43 PM
tfrank
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Relining the barrel...

Relining the barrel provided some interesting problems to solve. Thank goodness they weren't difficult, just time and attention to detail!!! So the left side of the picture below shows the barrel after it was drilled out for the liner. The problem was that there was still a bit of the cartridge rim cut-out or counter bore still there. This wasn't a surprise as I had this same issue with a 32 rimfire barrel that I relined. And I dealt with it in the same way. The MIG welder!!! Ran the liner drill back through the barrel then put the barrel in the lathe and got rid of the excess weld metal.

So this is what the chamber end of the barrel looked like after I chambered it and refiled the extractor/ejector cut. Cut a "Bentz" chamber as I am always looking to maximize accuracy, but with the Favorite's not so robust extractor/ejector design I didn't want a Match chamber as they will typically engrave the front driving bands of the bullet into the rifling making it difficult to extract an unfired round. The Bentz chamber is a Match chamber designed for semi-auto and typically the bullets driving bands are not being forced into the rifling so extraction of an unfired round is much easier!!!

Fitting the extractor/ejector was somewhat of a pain but that was partially my own fault. I measured the original extractor/ejector and I was surprised at the fact that the ejector/extractor was about .050" thinner than the extractor/ejector notch in the barrel face was deep. That is why I filled in the extractor/ejector notch with the MIG welder. Turns out I should have measured the NEW extractor/ejector before I chose to fill in the extractor/ejector notch, because I had to file every bit of it back out. Took a bit over an hour of filing aided by some very judicious use of my dremel at the beginning. After the extractor/ejector was properly fitted to the width and depth of the cut-out in the barrel its height had to be reduced as it was cut long so that it could be fitted to any Favorite. And of course I filed a tad bit too much which allowed the part of the case supported by the extractor/ejector to bulge slightly. Well obviously that's no good... MIG welder to the rescue!!! More filing and fitting, disassembling and reassembling and more filing and fitting... well you get the idea. Sometimes SLOWER is better. Second time around was a charm!!!
The picture below are the 10 test fires. Four after the 1st fitting and six more after I fitted the extractor/ejector for the 2nd time. The bulging is visible in 3 of the first 4 test fires. I think that might have had something to do with the play that was between the mounting hole of the ejector/extractor and the screw that supports the extractor/ejector, but that is just a guess on my part. The 2nd group of test fires show no bulging, in fact it looks like the ejector/extractor might be a frog hair too tall still. Well that is a whole lot better than too short.

God Bless, Frank.
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Old 01-14-2018, 06:39 PM
tfrank
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Crowned the muzzle, but...

Crowned the muzzle, but I didn't like the way it looked. The left half is the first crown and if you look closely you will notice that the bore is not concentric with the outside diameter of the barrel. And of course my dial caliper verified this. It's not unusual for the bore and OD to not be concentric, but to me the crown seemed to make it more noticeable, and that is the reason that I re-crowned a perfectly good crown.

When I use a flat target crown I typically inset it with a raised rim to better protect the crown. I could have done an 11 degree target crown but that would have required me to use the 4-jaw chuck and center it with a dial indicator. Using a flat crown eliminated the need for the 4-jaw chuck and centering the barrel. The original crown that Stevens used was a flat crown but there was no raised rim to protect the crown from dings and dents.
Next step was to fit the last two replacement screws that the owner sent me. The trigger and hammer screws. The small inset shows the original trigger and hammer screws next to the new trigger and hammer screw. The greater head thickness of the new screws necessitated that I deepen the recess in the receiver that they went in as they stood proud by quite a bit. Also the new screws were just a hair shorter than the original screws but deepening their recess allowed them to sit deeper in the receiver so thread engagement was the same. Otherwise I would have lost about half a thread of thread engagement.

Gotta get back to this rifle as I still need to re-mark the caliber designation on the barrel. Besides I was hungry and needed to get something to eat as well as a small break!!!
God Bless, Frank.
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Old 01-15-2018, 07:58 PM
tfrank
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Metamorphosis of a roll mark!!!

Metamorphosis of a roll mark!!! Since the rifle is no longer chambered in 25 Stevens the correct caliber needs to be marked on the barrel. Step 1, make some copper sleeves to protect that part of the roll mark that I don't want to alter. 3/4" copper pipe comes in kind of handy and steel doesn't stick to the copper!!!

The old caliber designation ground off and the copper sleeves in place. Ready for the MIG welder.

The ugly looking weld and the weld filed down to restore barrel contour.

And the new caliber designation!!!

So ends the saga of "Another 1915 Favorite"!!!
God Bless, Frank.
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Old 01-15-2018, 11:00 PM
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Terrific write up! Thanks for the photos and the inspiration.
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Old 01-16-2018, 10:35 AM
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Very nice work, thanks for posting it
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Old 01-20-2018, 06:36 PM
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I have a 1915 that was given to me, it was a ball of rust. The barrel was like a sewer pipe. I took a chance on one from ebay. The bore was great but the rim depth was over .080 so trimed the barrel and set it back. It turns out to be a real shooter. I found an old Lyman tang sight that fit. Boy, does that make a difference. Now I'M considering relining the old barrel to M2. Now I just need a butt plate.
Tfrank, you should have restamped it to 45-70

Last edited by lizardtrack; 01-20-2018 at 06:39 PM.
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Old 01-20-2018, 07:14 PM
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Wonderful write up and pictures. It will help, if I ever get my act together, on an old bag of parts I have that can be returned to service. Thanks for the time and effort. Randy
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Old 01-20-2018, 11:02 PM
tfrank
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Thumbs up If you do that I suspect...

Quote:
Originally Posted by lizardtrack View Post
I have a 1915 that was given to me, it was a ball of rust. The barrel was like a sewer pipe. I took a chance on one from ebay. The bore was great but the rim depth was over .080 so trimed the barrel and set it back. It turns out to be a real shooter. I found an old Lyman tang sight that fit. Boy, does that make a difference. Now I'M considering relining the old barrel to M2. Now I just need a butt plate.
Tfrank, you should have restamped it to 45-70
If you do that I suspect that your 22 caliber barrel will see much less use. I have an 1894 Favorite that I did "a little work on" and it is now a 17 Mach 2 rifle. I have an extra 22 caliber barrel that is being relined to 22 LR that will get done someday!!!
God Bless, Frank.
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